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Robert W Cort

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BUSINESS
November 8, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Interscope Executives Sign Paramount Deal: Robert W. Cort, president of producer Interscope, and David Madden, a partner there, are forming Cort-Madden Co. to develop and produce films for Paramount Pictures. The two will set up shop at the studio lot in January.
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BUSINESS
November 8, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Interscope Executives Sign Paramount Deal: Robert W. Cort, president of producer Interscope, and David Madden, a partner there, are forming Cort-Madden Co. to develop and produce films for Paramount Pictures. The two will set up shop at the studio lot in January.
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BUSINESS
September 27, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert W. Cort is resigning as president of Interscope Communications, ending an 11-year partnership with music mogul and company founder Ted Field that led to the company's production of more than 40 movies. Since teaming up in 1984, the two have jointly produced such hits as "Three Men and a Baby," "Outrageous Fortune" and "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle." More recently they have also produced such box office flops as "Dumbo Drop," "Roommates" and "The Tie That Binds."
BUSINESS
September 27, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert W. Cort is resigning as president of Interscope Communications, ending an 11-year partnership with music mogul and company founder Ted Field that led to the company's production of more than 40 movies. Since teaming up in 1984, the two have jointly produced such hits as "Three Men and a Baby," "Outrageous Fortune" and "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle." More recently they have also produced such box office flops as "Dumbo Drop," "Roommates" and "The Tie That Binds."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992 | Andy Marx
Their shelf-life has been impressive, but two movies long held out of release have turned up: "Boris and Natasha," starring Dave Thomas and Sally Kellerman as the spy couple of Rocky & Bullwinkle fame, is coming to cable TV, Jay Leno's first starring vehicle, the 1987 "Collision Course," is coming out on home video.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1993
Robert W. Cort's proposal on theater ticket prices (Commentary, July 25, and Letters, Aug. 1), while both provocative and insightful, is not as new a concept as some may believe. The practice of charging more for certain movies existed as early as the 1930s with films like "The Wizard of Oz" and "Gone With the Wind." My father was a theater owner in a small town in Illinois for more than 50 years, and since he was a pack rat, saving most everything he acquired, I have many of his records, including what he paid to show various films as well as his cash register receipts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1993
Regarding "One Price Doesn't Fit All," in which producer Robert W. Cort suggests variable pricing of movie tickets (July 25): I can't imagine any studio or producer agreeing to their films being shown for 1 cent less than the top ticket price when they open. Would Mel Brooks and 20th Century Fox ("Robin Hood: Men in Tights") agree to a lesser ticket price than charged for Philip Kaufman and 20th's "Rising Sun"? Not! Would Cort have accepted a $7.50 ticket price for "Three Men and a Baby" but $4 for "Cocktail"?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1989 | David Pecchia \f7
Body Chemistry (Concorde). Shooting in L.A. Marc Singer and Mary Crosby are two university sexual behavior researchers who are soon drawn into an irreversible and violent passionate affair of their own. Executive producer Roger Corman. Producer Alida Camp. Director Kristine Peterson. Screenwriter Jackson Barr. Also stars Lisa Pescia. Class Action (Interscope). Shooting in San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Gun in Betty Lou's Handbag" (citywide) is too silly and improbable to accomplish anything except to show off lovely Penelope Anne Miller's considerable range and skill as a comedian. Had there been more work on the script, Miller just might have been able to make the film work. Miller's Betty Lou, an assistant librarian in a picturesque Missouri town, is one of life's human doormats, letting her dogmatic boss (Marian Seldes) and her policeman husband (Eric Thal) walk all over her.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1993
Robert W. Cort's proposal on theater ticket prices (Commentary, July 25, and Letters, Aug. 1), while both provocative and insightful, is not as new a concept as some may believe. The practice of charging more for certain movies existed as early as the 1930s with films like "The Wizard of Oz" and "Gone With the Wind." My father was a theater owner in a small town in Illinois for more than 50 years, and since he was a pack rat, saving most everything he acquired, I have many of his records, including what he paid to show various films as well as his cash register receipts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1993
Regarding "One Price Doesn't Fit All," in which producer Robert W. Cort suggests variable pricing of movie tickets (July 25): I can't imagine any studio or producer agreeing to their films being shown for 1 cent less than the top ticket price when they open. Would Mel Brooks and 20th Century Fox ("Robin Hood: Men in Tights") agree to a lesser ticket price than charged for Philip Kaufman and 20th's "Rising Sun"? Not! Would Cort have accepted a $7.50 ticket price for "Three Men and a Baby" but $4 for "Cocktail"?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992 | Andy Marx
Their shelf-life has been impressive, but two movies long held out of release have turned up: "Boris and Natasha," starring Dave Thomas and Sally Kellerman as the spy couple of Rocky & Bullwinkle fame, is coming to cable TV, Jay Leno's first starring vehicle, the 1987 "Collision Course," is coming out on home video.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a director, Robert Resnikoff, in his debut feature "The First Power" (citywide), reveals a dynamic flair for action. As a writer, he's hard put to justify all the extreme violence he works up. In this sleek but grisly and far-fetched thriller of the supernatural, he means to terrify us but winds up leaving us merely numb, the usual effect of contrived exploitation fare.
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