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Robert W Duemling

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NEWS
May 19, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Oliver L. North and other Reagan Administration aides deliberately used a 1986 program of "humanitarian aid" for Nicaraguan rebels to help support the secret effort to deliver military aid to the contras , U.S. officials said Monday.
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NEWS
May 19, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Oliver L. North and other Reagan Administration aides deliberately used a 1986 program of "humanitarian aid" for Nicaraguan rebels to help support the secret effort to deliver military aid to the contras , U.S. officials said Monday.
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NEWS
October 12, 1985 | Associated Press
The United States has sent Nicaraguan rebels the first shipment of non-lethal supplies--boots, clothing and medicines--from the $27 million aid package approved by Congress last summer, the head of a special State Department office said Friday. Robert W. Duemling, director of the Nicaraguan Humanitarian Assistance Office, said the first supplies were flown from New Orleans on Thursday to a location in Central America that he would not disclose. He said his office has so far spent $980,000.
NEWS
December 6, 1986 | Associated Press
More than half the $27 million in non-lethal aid given to Nicaraguan contras "could not be fully tracked" and at least $80,000 was spent on false receipts, with some money diverted to buy ammunition, congressional investigators said Friday. The General Accounting Office, Congress' investigative arm, criticized limited State Department control over use of the funds, which were earmarked by Congress only for the purchase of "humanitarian" items, such as food, medicine and clothing.
NEWS
April 10, 1986 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Democrats who oppose President Reagan's policy in Central America charged Wednesday that the Administration has failed to account for at least $7.1 million of the money that was appropriated last year for the Nicaraguan rebels. The charge was made as the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Latin American affairs voted to approve a resolution of inquiry authored by California Rep. Leon E. Panetta (D-Monterey) that would require the President to supply details of how the money was spent.
NEWS
December 8, 1985 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
In a growing embarrassment to the Reagan Administration, most U.S. aid to the rebels fighting Nicaragua's leftist regime has been blocked for two months by the government of Honduras, leaving tons of supplies languishing in warehouses in New Orleans, officials say. The Hondurans have held up the shipments in an apparent attempt to pressure the United States into increasing its financial aid to their government, the officials said.
NEWS
November 16, 1985 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
After a slow and sometimes rocky start, the Reagan Administration's aid to Nicaragua's anti-Sandinista rebels this year has reached $5.5 million, will soon hit $11.5 million and is quietly expanding the U.S. role in the jungle war, officials said Friday. A growing number of the rebels, known as contras , are wearing U.S.-made boots, belts and canteens supplied under a U.S. law that permits "humanitarian" aid.
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | From Times Staff Writers
Following are excerpts from testimony Tuesday of Robert W. Owen, Lt. Col. Oliver L. North's "courier," on how he mingled arms and intelligence information for the contras, which Congress had sought to ban, with then-legal humanitarian aid.
NEWS
December 9, 1986 | MAURA DOLAN and KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writers
The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee said Monday that the evidence the panel has accumulated so far on the Iran arms operation does not justify the "toppling" of President Reagan but noted that key questions will not be answered until the White House turns over secret National Security Council memoranda.
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