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Robert W Fogel

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BUSINESS
October 13, 1993 | Adam S. Bauman
Robert Fogel and Douglass North were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in economics Tuesday by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Both professors were singled out as leading figures within the field of new economic history. Robert W. Fogel Born July 1, 1926, New York City Ph.D Johns Hopkins University, 1963 Director of the Center for Population Economics at the University of Chicago Key accomplishments: Has argued that slavery was economically efficient, though admitting it was deeply immoral.
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BUSINESS
October 13, 1993 | Adam S. Bauman
Robert Fogel and Douglass North were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in economics Tuesday by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Both professors were singled out as leading figures within the field of new economic history. Robert W. Fogel Born July 1, 1926, New York City Ph.D Johns Hopkins University, 1963 Director of the Center for Population Economics at the University of Chicago Key accomplishments: Has argued that slavery was economically efficient, though admitting it was deeply immoral.
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BUSINESS
October 13, 1993 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the fourth year in a row, a professor from the University of Chicago has won the Nobel Prize for economics--this time as part of a joint award, announced Tuesday, that elevates the study of economic history to a new level of respectability. University of Chicago Prof. Robert W. Fogel, author of a controversial book about the economics of U.S. slavery, and Washington University economist Douglass C.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1993 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the fourth year in a row, a professor from the University of Chicago has won the Nobel Prize for economics--this time as part of a joint award, announced Tuesday, that elevates the study of economic history to a new level of respectability. University of Chicago Prof. Robert W. Fogel, author of a controversial book about the economics of U.S. slavery, and Washington University economist Douglass C.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1995
Robert E. Lucas Jr. joins a long line of University of Chicago economics professors to win the Nobel Memorial Prize. Lucas won for his theory on how ordinary people's expectations can influence economic policies. Lucas' Insights * Rational expectations: Consumers and businesses rely on experience and information about the future to make their own economic decisions.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Robert W. Fogel of the University of Chicago has won this year's Nobel Prize in economics for his work in economic history, most notably two books that held slavery to have been economically efficient, though immoral. Such theorizing explains why so many people have an instinctive--and well-justified--distrust of economics. In fact, slavery was not economically efficient. Slave-grown cotton in the South brought a high return on investment within a closed system.
NEWS
October 16, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela and white President Frederik W. de Klerk, former enemies who joined forces to end roughly three centuries of repressive white rule and bring democracy to this strife-torn land, were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. The Nobel Committee in Oslo lauded the leaders of South Africa's two largest political organizations for "their work for the peaceful termination of the apartheid regime, and for laying the foundations for a new democratic South Africa."
BOOKS
February 18, 1990 | Eugene D. Genovese, Genovese is a historian of the Old South who lives in Atlanta
Not until the last quarter of the 17th Century did the world begin to abandon its routine acceptance of slavery as a natural and proper component of the social order. Until then, slavery had remained virtually unchallenged in Christian as well as non-Christian societies, theologically sanctioned and legally enforced. But with the expansion of European power across the Atlantic, slavery took a decisive turn. An increasingly moribund socio-economic system that enslaved people of all races received new life on a racial basis, with black peoples cast as those legitimately to be enslaved.
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