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Robert W Kearns

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BUSINESS
January 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A jury verdict that Ford Motor Co. violated patent rights on intermittent windshield wipers held by a former university professor could affect most major auto makers around the world. Robert W. Kearns, a former professor at Wayne State University in Detroit, won his patent infringement suit against Ford on Monday in federal court. He has filed similar suits against General Motors Corp., Chrysler Corp., Daimler-Benz, Honda, Toyota, Nissan and 21 other companies.
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BUSINESS
March 21, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court is letting inventor Robert Kearns collect about $21 million from Chrysler in a dispute over his design for intermittent windshield wipers. But don't assume Kearns is thrilled. "The booby prize is $21 million," he said Monday, complaining because the court denied his separate bid to bar Chrysler from continuing to use his design.
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BUSINESS
July 14, 1990
The defunct savings and loan properties are to be sold at virtually "fire sale" prices, which will result in potential billion-dollar losses. Where's the hurry? I am no real estate expert, but we all expect some inflation in the years ahead. The purchasers of the properties at bargain prices, reselling them several years hence, will surely profit handsomely, if for no other reason than inflation.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1992 | From Reuters
In a second victory for inventor Robert Kearns, a jury ruled Thursday that Chrysler Corp. should pay $11.3 million for infringing his patent for an intermittent windshield wiper. Kearns, 64, won the patent infringement case against Chrysler last December. A federal jury found then that Chrysler infringed on four patents for intermittent wiper systems designed by Kearns. However, in Thursday's decision, the jury ruled that Chrysler's infringement was not willful and ordered the No.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1990 | From Reuters
A federal judge declared a mistrial Wednesday when a jury was unable to agree on damages that Ford Motor Co. should pay an inventor for infringing on his patents for a widely used windshield wiper system. Inventor Robert Kearns, a former engineering professor who lives in Gaithersburg, Md., was seeking $325 million in damages from the nation's second-largest auto maker in a case that other car makers have been watching closely. U.S.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1992 | From Reuters
In a second victory for inventor Robert Kearns, a jury ruled Thursday that Chrysler Corp. should pay $11.3 million for infringing his patent for an intermittent windshield wiper. Kearns, 64, won the patent infringement case against Chrysler last December. A federal jury found then that Chrysler infringed on four patents for intermittent wiper systems designed by Kearns. However, in Thursday's decision, the jury ruled that Chrysler's infringement was not willful and ordered the No.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
The inventor of intermittent windshield wipers ended a 12-year-old patent-infringement lawsuit against Ford Motor Co. on Wednesday by accepting $10.2 million from the auto maker. A Ford attorney called the settlement "extremely reasonable," adding that the agreement resolved all disputes between the company and 63-year-old inventor Robert Kearns.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the classic David-versus-Goliath case that inventors and would-be inventors always dream about as they tinker in their garages. In 1963, Robert Kearns developed the first practical, intermittent windshield wiper, the device that makes it possible for wipers to be turned to slow speeds during misty weather. Ever since, he has been fighting the auto industry, claiming that the big companies stole his idea.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court is letting inventor Robert Kearns collect about $21 million from Chrysler in a dispute over his design for intermittent windshield wipers. But don't assume Kearns is thrilled. "The booby prize is $21 million," he said Monday, complaining because the court denied his separate bid to bar Chrysler from continuing to use his design.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jury Finds Chrysler Infringed on Wiper Patent: The inventor of the intermittent windshield wiper won his patent infringement suit against Chrysler Corp. It was Robert Kearns' second victory against one of the Big Three auto makers. Kearns said he is seeking $36 million from Chrysler and a 12-year contract to supply intermittent wipers to the company. The jury will meet in January to hear arguments on damages. In a 1990 case against Ford Motor Co., Kearns agreed to a $10.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jury Finds Chrysler Infringed on Wiper Patent: The inventor of the intermittent windshield wiper won his patent infringement suit against Chrysler Corp. It was Robert Kearns' second victory against one of the Big Three auto makers. Kearns said he is seeking $36 million from Chrysler and a 12-year contract to supply intermittent wipers to the company. The jury will meet in January to hear arguments on damages. In a 1990 case against Ford Motor Co., Kearns agreed to a $10.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
The inventor of intermittent windshield wipers ended a 12-year-old patent-infringement lawsuit against Ford Motor Co. on Wednesday by accepting $10.2 million from the auto maker. A Ford attorney called the settlement "extremely reasonable," adding that the agreement resolved all disputes between the company and 63-year-old inventor Robert Kearns.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1990
The defunct savings and loan properties are to be sold at virtually "fire sale" prices, which will result in potential billion-dollar losses. Where's the hurry? I am no real estate expert, but we all expect some inflation in the years ahead. The purchasers of the properties at bargain prices, reselling them several years hence, will surely profit handsomely, if for no other reason than inflation.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1990 | From Reuters
A federal judge declared a mistrial Wednesday when a jury was unable to agree on damages that Ford Motor Co. should pay an inventor for infringing on his patents for a widely used windshield wiper system. Inventor Robert Kearns, a former engineering professor who lives in Gaithersburg, Md., was seeking $325 million in damages from the nation's second-largest auto maker in a case that other car makers have been watching closely. U.S.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the classic David-versus-Goliath case that inventors and would-be inventors always dream about as they tinker in their garages. In 1963, Robert Kearns developed the first practical, intermittent windshield wiper, the device that makes it possible for wipers to be turned to slow speeds during misty weather. Ever since, he has been fighting the auto industry, claiming that the big companies stole his idea.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A jury verdict that Ford Motor Co. violated patent rights on intermittent windshield wipers held by a former university professor could affect most major auto makers around the world. Robert W. Kearns, a former professor at Wayne State University in Detroit, won his patent infringement suit against Ford on Monday in federal court. He has filed similar suits against General Motors Corp., Chrysler Corp., Daimler-Benz, Honda, Toyota, Nissan and 21 other companies.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The inventor who claims Ford Motor Co. and other auto makers stole his idea for an intermittent windshield wiper system did not return to court this morning after stalking out in a disagreement with a judge. An official for U.S. District Judge Avern Cohn said Robert W. Kearns, 62, had still not reappeared in court at the resumption of the trial today to determine how much Ford should pay him in the damages phase of his 12-year-old patent infringement suit.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1990 | From Associated Press
Ford Motor Co. infringed on a former professor's patent for the intermittent windshield wiper used on its cars, a jury ruled in a potentially far-reaching and lucrative case for the inventor. The verdict Monday could affect similar lawsuits by Robert W. Kearns against General Motors Corp., Chrysler Corp., Daimler-Benz, Honda, Toyota, Nissan and 21 other companies. The Ford case was the first to go to trial. The federal jury will reconvene Feb. 26 to establish how much Ford must pay Kearns.
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