Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert W Morgan
IN THE NEWS

Robert W Morgan

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert W. Morgan, a legendary broadcaster who was an early-morning fixture on Southern California drive-time radio for more than three decades, has died after a lengthy battle with lung cancer. He was 60. Morgan died Friday evening at Encino-Tarzana Regional Medical Center, said Joni Caryl, news director at KRTH-FM (101.1), where Morgan worked from 1992 until his illness-induced retirement in January.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1998
Like thousands of other Southern Californians, I read with sadness of the passing of Robert W. Morgan (May 24). Robert W. was more than a disc jockey. For years he woke us up in the morning, commuted with us to school or work and shared that cup of coffee first thing in the "Morgan." I especially remember my ninth-grade graduating class being "Morganized" in 1973. We didn't lose a "Boss-Jock." We lost a member of the family. MARK P. REDICK Venice Beach
Advertisement
SPORTS
July 18, 1992 | LARRY STEWART
Longtime KMPC morning radio personality Robert W. Morgan is switching stations. Morgan's last day at KMPC was Friday and he will start at KRTH-FM on Aug. 24, where he will be a morning disc jockey. After KMPC went to a sports format on April 27, Morgan resisted and continued with a non-sports show, although without music. He acknowledged Friday that he has been uncomfortable with the sports format, and also said he was miscast once the station dropped music.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1998 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert W. Morgan won't quite reach his goal for radio longevity. "My contract is over in 2000 and I'd planned to retire then," he says, sitting in the still-Christmasy living room of his Tarzana home, his familiar voice weakened by the lung cancer that has forced him to retire two years short of that mark. "I figured one millennium on the air is enough."
SPORTS
June 6, 1992
Don't know much about the Lampley-Morgan feud on KMPC (May 29). I stopped listening when KMPC went all-sports. I like sports, but how can you listen to a constant barrage of cliches and repetitions that are part of this format? I have peeked in on Robert W. Morgan a couple of times out of curiosity and I hear boring banter. Before, we had music and Pat Buttram with jokes to liven things up. Even the "laughmatics" who chuckled over any minor wisdom of Morgan's are gone. All that's left is Morgan, an ocean of ego with a teacup of talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993
Your article provided some subtle insights into the state of radio today. Having spent the last 25 years on-air at major stations in cities across this country, I know that all of these men are held in the highest regard by thousands of their peers from coast to coast. It's been my privilege to have known and worked with several of them. They represent a level of professionalism and an understanding of their trade lacking in many broadcasters today. They have a respect for the music as well as the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1998 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert W. Morgan won't quite reach his goal for radio longevity. "My contract is over in 2000 and I'd planned to retire then," he says, sitting in the still-Christmasy living room of his Tarzana home, his familiar voice weakened by the lung cancer that has forced him to retire two years short of that mark. "I figured one millennium on the air is enough."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Claudia Puig is a Times staff writer
The year was 1966. A late-night call came in to the switchboard at KHJ-AM, Los Angeles' powerhouse rock 'n' roll station. On the line was Brian Wilson, the creative force behind the Beach Boys, the local surf band that had already attained superstar status. He was calling from the recording studio where he had just finished cutting the seminal rock record "Good Vibrations." Did KHJ want to be the first to play it? "Bands would cut a record on Tuesday, and Wednesday they'd give us a tape," recalled former KHJ deejay Charlie Tuna.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
On the Air: Hollywood's honorary mayor Johnny Grant has joined Robert W. Morgan's KMPC early morning radio broadcast to handle the weather and traffic reports. Grant, who is also chairman of the Walk of Fame selection committee, hosted KMPC's "Freeway Club" during most of the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993
I was the program director at KHJ during the first five years of its "Boss Radio" format (1965-69), after which I joined former KRLA competitor Casey Kasem to co-create "American Top 40." Your story rightfully pays tribute to some great broadcast professionals, who, like the music they play, continue to maintain their appeal. As in any endeavor, much of their success derived from diligent behind-the-scenes effort. Robert W. Morgan, Don Steele and Harvey Miller are prime examples that KHJ's operating philosophy of "preparation, concentration and moderation" remains an effective dictum.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Claudia Puig is a Times staff writer
The year was 1966. A late-night call came in to the switchboard at KHJ-AM, Los Angeles' powerhouse rock 'n' roll station. On the line was Brian Wilson, the creative force behind the Beach Boys, the local surf band that had already attained superstar status. He was calling from the recording studio where he had just finished cutting the seminal rock record "Good Vibrations." Did KHJ want to be the first to play it? "Bands would cut a record on Tuesday, and Wednesday they'd give us a tape," recalled former KHJ deejay Charlie Tuna.
SPORTS
July 18, 1992 | LARRY STEWART
Longtime KMPC morning radio personality Robert W. Morgan is switching stations. Morgan's last day at KMPC was Friday and he will start at KRTH-FM on Aug. 24, where he will be a morning disc jockey. After KMPC went to a sports format on April 27, Morgan resisted and continued with a non-sports show, although without music. He acknowledged Friday that he has been uncomfortable with the sports format, and also said he was miscast once the station dropped music.
SPORTS
June 6, 1992
Don't know much about the Lampley-Morgan feud on KMPC (May 29). I stopped listening when KMPC went all-sports. I like sports, but how can you listen to a constant barrage of cliches and repetitions that are part of this format? I have peeked in on Robert W. Morgan a couple of times out of curiosity and I hear boring banter. Before, we had music and Pat Buttram with jokes to liven things up. Even the "laughmatics" who chuckled over any minor wisdom of Morgan's are gone. All that's left is Morgan, an ocean of ego with a teacup of talent.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|