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Robert W Ray

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October 19, 1999 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert W. Ray, a top deputy to independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, formally took over the long-running Whitewater investigation Monday and immediately promised to be "thorough and fair" in finishing the inquiry as soon as possible. Standing on the steps of the U.S. Courthouse, Ray, 39, told reporters that he and his colleagues would "continue the work of this investigation in a prompt, responsible and cost-effective manner." He declined to answer questions.
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May 13, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Robert Ray, a former independent counsel who investigated President Clinton's affair with Monica Lewinsky, turned himself in to police on charges of stalking a former girlfriend, according to the Manhattan district attorney's office. New York police say Ray's former girlfriend, a 40-year-old Manhattan woman, filed a complaint that he persisted in sending e-mail and knocking on her door months after she broke off their relationship.
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NEWS
June 10, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the successor to Kenneth W. Starr, one of the most vilified public figures in recent times, Robert W. Ray harbors no illusions that completing all the Whitewater-related investigations is going to bring him a ringing chorus of praise. But as independent counsel, Ray hopes that both friends and foes of the Clinton administration, and all those in between, will be satisfied with his final reports when he finishes his work early next year.
NEWS
January 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
Kenneth W. Starr, whose six-year investigation of former President Clinton ranged from Whitewater to Monica S. Lewinsky, said Sunday that the deal sealed by Clinton last week was a fitting end to an "unfortunate era." The last-minute agreement between Clinton and Starr's successor as independent counsel, Robert W.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Independent counsel Robert W. Ray, acknowledging the public's wish that he finish work, said a decision on prosecuting President Clinton for his conduct in the Monica S. Lewinsky scandal will come "very shortly" after Clinton leaves the White House in January. "I think the public would like me to wrap up this investigation, but that doesn't mean walk away from the responsibilities I have," Ray said on CNN's "Late Edition."
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | From Reuters
Here is the text of a statement by independent counsel Robert W. Ray explaining his decision announced Friday to drop his investigation of President Clinton over the Monica S. Lewinsky affair: Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. Fifteen months ago, I promised the American people that I would complete this investigation promptly and responsibly. Today, I fulfill that promise. President Clinton has acknowledged responsibility for his actions.
NEWS
January 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
Kenneth W. Starr, whose six-year investigation of former President Clinton ranged from Whitewater to Monica S. Lewinsky, said Sunday that the deal sealed by Clinton last week was a fitting end to an "unfortunate era." The last-minute agreement between Clinton and Starr's successor as independent counsel, Robert W.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
Independent counsel Robert W. Ray won't prosecute anyone in the White House travel office controversy, and is putting the finishing touches on a report likely to be made public before Hillary Rodham Clinton's Senate campaign ends, officials say.
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Independent counsel Robert W. Ray considers the investigation of President Clinton's relationship with Monica S. Lewinsky an "open matter" and is actively considering seeking an indictment against the president after he leaves office next January. Rather than winding down the independent counsel's office after the departure of Kenneth W.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic punctuation to his tumultuous presidency, President Clinton struck a deal Friday ensuring that he will not be criminally prosecuted for making false statements about his affair with Monica S. Lewinsky. Clinton, in a surprise deal reached with independent counsel Robert W.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The deal between Bill Clinton and the office of his old nemesis, Kenneth W. Starr, developed quickly and even civilly--chiefly in the last three to four weeks--because both sides saw it as beneficial. Independent counsel Robert W. Ray, Starr's successor, had seemed hellbent on getting an indictment of Clinton soon after the president left office, so much so that he insisted on putting Monica S. Lewinsky through the rigors of another secret interrogation in his office on Dec. 8.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | From Reuters
Here is the text of a statement by independent counsel Robert W. Ray explaining his decision announced Friday to drop his investigation of President Clinton over the Monica S. Lewinsky affair: Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. Fifteen months ago, I promised the American people that I would complete this investigation promptly and responsibly. Today, I fulfill that promise. President Clinton has acknowledged responsibility for his actions.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | Associated Press
The statement released Friday by President Clinton on the Monica S. Lewinsky case, as transcribed by EMediaMillWorks Inc.: Today, I signed a consent order in the lawsuit brought by the Arkansas Committee on Professional Conduct, which brings to an end that proceeding.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | JANET HOOK and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They may have failed two years ago in their drive to oust President Clinton from office, but Republicans in Congress claimed some measure of vindication Friday in the agreement he reached to avoid possible indictment for his conduct in the Monica S. Lewinsky scandal. "The action taken today vindicates the House impeachment proceeding and reaffirms that our actions were in defense of the rule of law, rather than merely a political initiative," said Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic punctuation to his tumultuous presidency, President Clinton struck a deal Friday ensuring that he will not be criminally prosecuted for making false statements about his affair with Monica S. Lewinsky. Clinton, in a surprise deal reached with independent counsel Robert W.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | RICHARD T. COOPER and JACK NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Americans like to say that the United States is more than just "a nation of laws, not men," as John Adams put it. Yet Friday's decision by independent counsel Robert W. Ray not to prosecute President Clinton after he leaves office is a reaffirmation that this is a nation, above all else, that has a way of keeping one eye on its own best interest. For the third time in a generation, prosecutors have considered indicting a president or former president of the United States on criminal charges.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Signaling what may be further legal trouble for President Clinton, independent counsel Robert W. Ray is planning to interview former White House intern Monica S. Lewinsky in connection with a federal grand jury he impaneled last summer. Some lawyers familiar with the independent counsel's office said that the action suggests Ray may be seeking to indict Clinton on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice after he leaves office next month.
NEWS
March 20, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new independent counsel in charge of various long-running probes connected with President Clinton declared Sunday that he is hiring more investigators to help determine whether to seek criminal charges in matters including the Monica S. Lewinsky affair. Independent counsel Robert W. Ray, who took over from Kenneth W.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Signaling what may be further legal trouble for President Clinton, independent counsel Robert W. Ray is planning to interview former White House intern Monica S. Lewinsky in connection with a federal grand jury he impaneled last summer. Some lawyers familiar with the independent counsel's office said that the action suggests Ray may be seeking to indict Clinton on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice after he leaves office next month.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Independent counsel Robert W. Ray, acknowledging the public's wish that he finish work, said a decision on prosecuting President Clinton for his conduct in the Monica S. Lewinsky scandal will come "very shortly" after Clinton leaves the White House in January. "I think the public would like me to wrap up this investigation, but that doesn't mean walk away from the responsibilities I have," Ray said on CNN's "Late Edition."
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