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NEWS
December 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
Illegal drugs from cocaine to heroin should be legalized, taxed and dispensed by the state because the so-called war on drugs is failing, a federal judge said Tuesday. "I suggest it is time to abolish the prohibition--to cease treating indulgence in mind-alteration as a crime," U.S. District Judge Robert W. Sweet said in remarks that were to be delivered Tuesday evening before the Cosmopolitan Club, a social club for women and men. The press was not allowed to cover the speech.
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NEWS
December 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
Illegal drugs from cocaine to heroin should be legalized, taxed and dispensed by the state because the so-called war on drugs is failing, a federal judge said Tuesday. "I suggest it is time to abolish the prohibition--to cease treating indulgence in mind-alteration as a crime," U.S. District Judge Robert W. Sweet said in remarks that were to be delivered Tuesday evening before the Cosmopolitan Club, a social club for women and men. The press was not allowed to cover the speech.
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NEWS
October 15, 1989 | from Associated Press
President Bush will nominate Robert W. Sweet Jr. as administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the White House announced last week.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The New York Times has a 1st Amendment right to protect the confidentiality of its sources by denying the government phone records in certain instances, U.S. District Judge Robert W. Sweet ruled in New York. Saying that secrecy in government appeared to be on the rise, Sweet refused to toss out a 1st Amendment lawsuit the newspaper filed last year to stop the Department of Justice from getting records of phone calls between two veteran journalists and sources.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The FBI has told the families of the 230 people killed on TWA Flight 800 that the investigation is in its final phase, and no evidence has been found that a criminal or terrorist was responsible. The Paris-bound plane exploded over the Atlantic Ocean shortly after takeoff from Kennedy International Airport on July 17. The plane has been reassembled in a hangar, and a federal judge urged the National Transportation Safety Board to allow lawyers for the families to inspect the wreckage.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Drugs, including cocaine and heroin, should be legalized, taxed and dispensed by the state because the war on drugs is being lost, U.S. District Judge Robert W. Sweet said in a New York City speech. The result, he said, "would be the elimination of the profit motive, the gangs, the drug dealers." Sweet said the effort to stem the drug epidemic by jailing more people is not working. Sweet said he believes the root cause of the drug epidemic is the attraction of high profits for those in poverty.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Judge Denies Access to Nasdaq Tapes: A federal judge rejected a request by the Los Angeles Times for access to about 17 hours of taped conversations that are at the heart of the Justice Department's antitrust investigation of Nasdaq dealers. The tapes, first obtained by the Justice Department, had been turned over to investors' lawyers in a private class-action lawsuit against 33 dealer firms. But they had been sealed by court order. In his ruling, U.S. District Judge Robert W.
NEWS
June 3, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in New York said the TWA Flight 800 explosion did not occur on the "high seas," a ruling that could make victims eligible for additional money in their lawsuit against the airline and the aircraft manufacturers. Victims' families say Boeing Co., TWA and Hydoaire Inc. were negligent in the construction and operation of the Boeing 747 that exploded more than three nautical miles off the shore from New York after taking off for Paris in July 1996.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2005 | From Reuters and Associated Press
A federal judge Tuesday dismissed a trading-abuse lawsuit against the New York Stock Exchange, but left large parts of the suit against "specialist" trading firms in place. The ruling means that specialists, such as LaBranche & Co., must defend themselves against the remaining claims. Specialist firms are the market makers that buy and sell specifically assigned stocks on the NYSE trading floor to ensure liquidity and orderly markets.
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