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Robert W Zentis

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1994 | Barbara Isenberg, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
Set designer Robert W. Zentis likes the idea of nearing 60. "It is exhilarating," he says, "to feel myself thinking like a young man with an old and oiled mind." It doesn't hurt that Zentis apparently also has the energy of a young man. "Secret Honor: The Last Testament of Richard M. Nixon," a revival of the award-winning play by Donald Freed and Arnold M. Stone, is Zentis' 15th show this year. "Secret Honor" is at Hollywood's Fountain Theatre, where Zentis works as resident designer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1994 | Barbara Isenberg, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
Set designer Robert W. Zentis likes the idea of nearing 60. "It is exhilarating," he says, "to feel myself thinking like a young man with an old and oiled mind." It doesn't hurt that Zentis apparently also has the energy of a young man. "Secret Honor: The Last Testament of Richard M. Nixon," a revival of the award-winning play by Donald Freed and Arnold M. Stone, is Zentis' 15th show this year. "Secret Honor" is at Hollywood's Fountain Theatre, where Zentis works as resident designer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1987 | Ray Loynd
"Minotaur," like its mythological namesake, deals with a bull-like character who is a heavyweight boxer caught in a labyrinth of personal turmoil. The production is an interesting failure--alternately visceral and flabby. Dramatic literature's finest plays about boxing--"Golden Boy" (1937), "The Great White Hope" (1967), the short-lived Broadway adaptation of "Requiem for a Heavyweight" (1985)--featured gripping central characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
In one of the playlets that make up "Hudson Shorts," now at the Hudson Theatre in Hollywood, a budding dramatist admits that his latest production "doesn't mean anything . . . we just did it to attract the studios." One suspects similar motives behind this gimmicky and tremendously uneven collection, which has been coordinated by Valerie Landsburg into a series of three rotating bills, each with eight or nine one-acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1995 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
That most deft and venomous of theater critics, Dorothy Parker, would have to come back from the grave to find exactly the right excoriating phrases to describe "Dottie!," a spectacularly bad musical at the Fountain Theatre based on Parker's life. Director Jay Alan Quantrill also wrote the book, music and lyrics for this slumbering behemoth, which clocks in at three hours plus, and makes you keenly empathize with what those sloths must have felt, wallowing in the tar-pits.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"T his is the dawning of the Age of Aquarius ... Age of Aquarius The first was that the show simply wasn't ready. A new director, John DiFusco, had joined the production, and he obviously needed more time to shape it to his vision. This was a preview-level performance, with microphones squeaking, the audience sweltering (the air conditioner is supposed to be installed by next week) and the company still settling into its roles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1989 | T. H. McCULLOH
The backdrop of Dexter Freeman's "Skies a' Fallin' " is familiar. So, vaguely, are the characters. But in this world premiere production at the Court Theatre, a new twist is given to the old steamy night in New Orleans on the eve of Mardi Gras. It's a tight little tale about a husband and wife stumbling toward their 40s and fracturing their relationship over their childlessness, and the guitar-toting 17-year-old street kid who pulls them apart and then puts them back together again.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
The Living Edge Theater Company likes to live close to the edge and displayed both imagination and ambition when it undertook a production of British playwright Howard Brenton's "Bloody Poetry" as part of last fall's Fringe Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1990 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bravo to the California Youth Theatre for exceeding expectations in its staging of one of the most lyrical plays ever written, Edmond Rostand's "Cyrano de Bergerac." Yes, the production and its cast of 8-to-21-year-olds have limitations, despite professional guidance from veteran director Malcolm Black and fight director B.H. Barry. The five acts of romance, earthy humor, tragedy and poetry begin with admirable momentum, then slow perceptibly. The three and a half hours do not fly by.
NEWS
November 5, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert W. Zentis, one of the West Coast's foremost theater designers, has died at the age of 61. Zentis, who worked mainly in small theaters, most recently was resident set designer at the 78-seat Fountain Theatre. He died Oct. 26 in Los Angeles, the theater announced Monday. He designed and lighted as many as 25 plays, operas and industrial shows a year and won so many awards from Drama-Logue (more than 30) and the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle (four) that he stopped framing them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Near the end of 1992, it is easy to be surfeited with the telling and retelling, deconstructing, reconstructing, revising and politicizing of the story of Christopher Columbus. But 500 years after Columbus first set keel in the Caribbean, one prescient man seems to have had a sense of how to view the affair in a vision developed not in America but in Belgium, not in 1992 but in 1927.
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