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Robert Wendland

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January 2, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Robert Wendland, 48, can toss and catch a ball from a hospital gurney and follow simple commands. He cannot walk, talk, eat or communicate his wishes. His mother says he can kiss her hand. She is fighting to keep him alive. His wife says he "died seven years ago" in a car accident. What she calls the "shell" that remains of Robert Wendland cannot recognize her or their children. They have gone to court to let him die.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2001
Re "Wishes Aren't Evidence," editorial, Aug. 14: The California Supreme Court made clear that Robert Wendland's wishes were very important and that they would be evidence. For the court, the problem was that Wendland hadn't been clear enough about his wishes so that his family could prove what his wishes were. Two and one-half million Americans die each year. For many, the months or days preceding death involve incapacity and a loss of control over decisions about their own care. They need others to make decisions for them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN and BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The wife of a man whose life became the subject of a closely watched right-to-die case asked the California Supreme Court on Wednesday to issue a ruling despite her husband's death this week. "I would hope that families wouldn't have to go through what we went through," Rose Wendland, Robert Wendland's legal conservator, said at a news conference in Stockton.
NEWS
August 10, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Family members may not withdraw feeding tubes from conscious but severely brain-damaged loved ones unless they clearly show that the patient would have wanted to die, the California Supreme Court held Thursday. The unanimous ruling was a blow to the right-to-die movement and a defeat for the California Medical Assn. It will probably affect thousands of patients, including Alzheimer's and stroke victims, who are conscious but unable to communicate their wishes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001
Re "Out of a Coma, Into a Twilight," Jan. 2: Two and a half years ago my wife, who was a top advertising executive in Los Angeles, suffered a massive brain hemorrhage at the age of 43. This left me and our 11-year-old daughter involved in a situation similar to that of Rose Wendland and her children. My wife seems to be in a situation similar to Robert Wendland's, unable to eat, talk, move or walk and left with little short- or long-term memory. She will not recover. When my wife suffered her stroke I was out of the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2001
Re "Wishes Aren't Evidence," editorial, Aug. 14: The California Supreme Court made clear that Robert Wendland's wishes were very important and that they would be evidence. For the court, the problem was that Wendland hadn't been clear enough about his wishes so that his family could prove what his wishes were. Two and one-half million Americans die each year. For many, the months or days preceding death involve incapacity and a loss of control over decisions about their own care. They need others to make decisions for them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A severely disabled man who is the subject of a closely watched right-to-die case before the California Supreme Court died of pneumonia Tuesday, family lawyers and a hospital official said. Robert Wendland, 49, who suffered brain damage in a car accident in 1993, died at 2:40 p.m. at Lodi Memorial Hospital, according to a hospital official. Wendland's mother, Florence Wendland, who had for years prevented his wife, Rose, from removing his feeding and hydration tube, was with him.
NEWS
August 10, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Family members may not withdraw feeding tubes from conscious but severely brain-damaged loved ones unless they clearly show that the patient would have wanted to die, the California Supreme Court held Thursday. The unanimous ruling was a blow to the right-to-die movement and a defeat for the California Medical Assn. It will probably affect thousands of patients, including Alzheimer's and stroke victims, who are conscious but unable to communicate their wishes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001
Rest in peace, Robert Wendland. He's the 49-year-old California brother, father, son and husband who accidentally became the latest right-to-die national test case. His death of pneumonia Tuesday, however, does not relieve a willfully inattentive American society of the need to develop moral and ethical guidelines for end-of-life decisions. It probably shouldn't be surprising that a society that cannot yet agree on when life actually begins can also not agree on when it may end.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a pivotal right-to-die case, the California Supreme Court appeared reluctant Wednesday to permit a Stockton woman to remove a feeding tube from her severely brain-damaged, but conscious, husband. The court heard arguments in the case of Robert Wendland, a 49-year-old who suffered extensive brain damage in a 1993 car accident. He cannot speak, eat, walk, go to the bathroom or communicate by blinking his eyes or using machinery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001
Rest in peace, Robert Wendland. He's the 49-year-old California brother, father, son and husband who accidentally became the latest right-to-die national test case. His death of pneumonia Tuesday, however, does not relieve a willfully inattentive American society of the need to develop moral and ethical guidelines for end-of-life decisions. It probably shouldn't be surprising that a society that cannot yet agree on when life actually begins can also not agree on when it may end.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN and BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The wife of a man whose life became the subject of a closely watched right-to-die case asked the California Supreme Court on Wednesday to issue a ruling despite her husband's death this week. "I would hope that families wouldn't have to go through what we went through," Rose Wendland, Robert Wendland's legal conservator, said at a news conference in Stockton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A severely disabled man who is the subject of a closely watched right-to-die case before the California Supreme Court died of pneumonia Tuesday, family lawyers and a hospital official said. Robert Wendland, 49, who suffered brain damage in a car accident in 1993, died at 2:40 p.m. at Lodi Memorial Hospital, according to a hospital official. Wendland's mother, Florence Wendland, who had for years prevented his wife, Rose, from removing his feeding and hydration tube, was with him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Wendland, the subject of a pivotal right-to-die case before the California Supreme Court, is near death, a lawyer for his mother said Monday. Florence Wendland, Robert's mother, filed an emergency petition Monday before the 3rd District Court of Appeal to allow a doctor of her choice to examine her son. She has fought her daughter-in-law in court for six years to keep Robert, who is brain-damaged but conscious, alive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2001
Re "A Gift for the Living," editorial, June 3: There is a simple approach to the problem of when to pull the plug on the terminally ill, and that is to require all medical insurance policies, including Medicare, to offer alternatives related to terminal illness. Persons covered would be required to select options of treatment. These options, clearly defined, should vary from all-out actions to prolong life to only those necessary to relieve pain after a patient is determined to be terminally ill. The cost of the policy would vary depending on the option selected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a pivotal right-to-die case, the California Supreme Court appeared reluctant Wednesday to permit a Stockton woman to remove a feeding tube from her severely brain-damaged, but conscious, husband. The court heard arguments in the case of Robert Wendland, a 49-year-old who suffered extensive brain damage in a 1993 car accident. He cannot speak, eat, walk, go to the bathroom or communicate by blinking his eyes or using machinery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Wendland, the subject of a pivotal right-to-die case before the California Supreme Court, is near death, a lawyer for his mother said Monday. Florence Wendland, Robert's mother, filed an emergency petition Monday before the 3rd District Court of Appeal to allow a doctor of her choice to examine her son. She has fought her daughter-in-law in court for six years to keep Robert, who is brain-damaged but conscious, alive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2001
Re "A Gift for the Living," editorial, June 3: There is a simple approach to the problem of when to pull the plug on the terminally ill, and that is to require all medical insurance policies, including Medicare, to offer alternatives related to terminal illness. Persons covered would be required to select options of treatment. These options, clearly defined, should vary from all-out actions to prolong life to only those necessary to relieve pain after a patient is determined to be terminally ill. The cost of the policy would vary depending on the option selected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001
Re "Out of a Coma, Into a Twilight," Jan. 2: Two and a half years ago my wife, who was a top advertising executive in Los Angeles, suffered a massive brain hemorrhage at the age of 43. This left me and our 11-year-old daughter involved in a situation similar to that of Rose Wendland and her children. My wife seems to be in a situation similar to Robert Wendland's, unable to eat, talk, move or walk and left with little short- or long-term memory. She will not recover. When my wife suffered her stroke I was out of the country.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Robert Wendland, 48, can toss and catch a ball from a hospital gurney and follow simple commands. He cannot walk, talk, eat or communicate his wishes. His mother says he can kiss her hand. She is fighting to keep him alive. His wife says he "died seven years ago" in a car accident. What she calls the "shell" that remains of Robert Wendland cannot recognize her or their children. They have gone to court to let him die.
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