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Robert Wesley

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October 31, 1990 | HERMAN WONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Berlin Wall has fallen. Glasnost reigns. Gorbachev has won a Nobel Peace Prize. The Cold War, as we have known it for more than four decades, appears to be over. And with its demise, many Americans also see an end to the ultimate nightmare--nuclear destruction from a U.S.-Soviet showdown. But for anti-nuclear activists like Dr. Robert Wesley of Irvine, the nightmare has merely changed its shape, becoming more subtle, more complex, more insidious.
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NEWS
October 31, 1990 | HERMAN WONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Berlin Wall has fallen. Glasnost reigns. Gorbachev has won a Nobel Peace Prize. The Cold War, as we have known it for more than four decades, appears to be over. And with its demise, many Americans also see an end to the ultimate nightmare--nuclear destruction from a U.S.-Soviet showdown. But for anti-nuclear activists like Dr. Robert Wesley of Irvine, the nightmare has merely changed its shape, becoming more subtle, more complex, more insidious.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1989
A 46-year-old Vista man was found beaten to death Thursday, a Sheriff's Department spokesman said. The body of Robert Wesley Frazier was found with several blows to the head in the apartment on Palomar Place where Frazier lived, spokesman Ed Lynch said. Deputies investigating a missing-person report by Cheron Frazier, the victim's estranged wife, found the body at 3:45 p.m. Cheron Frazier told deputies that Frazier had been missing since Monday, Lynch said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1990
Sheriff's deputies arrested a 30-year-old woman Friday morning in downtown San Diego in connection with the murder of a Vista man last October. Denise Michelle Coleman of San Diego was taken into custody about 8:50 a.m. after deputies traced her to a building in the 4500 block of Market Street, said Detective Charles Curtis. Authorities had been looking several months for Coleman as a possible suspect in the stabbing-bludgeoning death of Robert Wesley Frazier, Curtis said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
Harvey is no dummy. The $115,000 manikin with the baby blue eyes can simulate symptoms of about 30 cardiovascular diseases, helping medical students learn to recognize an array of heart-related problems. Harvey is the first cardiology training simulator of its kind in the state. It was unveiled last month at the UC Irvine College of Medicine. Medical educators say patient simulation is the wave of the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1996
On the theory that every gun that is taken off the street makes the world a bit safer, gun swap and buyback programs have sprung up around the nation. In Yorba Linda last weekend, 15 guns were exchanged for teddy bears--a program that not only took some weapons out of circulation but also put some smiles on the faces of youngsters and parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
Harvey is no dummy. The $115,000 medical manikin with the baby-blue eyes can simulate about 30 cardiovascular diseases as the first cardiology training simulator of its kind in the state. Harvey gives UC Irvine medical school students the opportunity to learn how to recognize an array of heart-related problems, which normally could take years of on-the-job experience to encounter. Medical educators say patient simulation is the wave of the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
The owner of a San Diego ship repair company pleaded not guilty Friday to a litany of federal charges ranging from conspiracy and embezzlement to violating campaign contribution laws. David Lee Bain, the owner and president of Pacific Ship Repair & Fabrication Inc., was released on a $300,000 bond secured by his home after entering his plea. He is named in a wide-ranging indictment announced Thursday by the U.S. attorney's office in San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1994
Gun violence has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Physicians for Social Responsibility fully supports the reasonable measures to curb gun violence outlined in a recent series of Los Angeles Times editorials. We wish to clarify the perception of our work (Dec. 3). While the Cold War has ended, and public perception of the threat has diminished, the actual threat from weapons of mass destruction remains and perhaps is growing, as many recent articles in The Times on proliferation issues in general and the North Korean nuclear program in particular have pointed out. We oppose the instruments of societal destruction in all their forms, whether it be the global threat from nuclear weapons or the massive proliferation of guns in our streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1990
Placed on fourth page of the Nov. 29 edition of The Times was a momentous event that seemed to go unnoticed. Brazil and Argentina unilaterally negotiated a mutual ban on the production and testing of nuclear weapons. This is an achievement which should warrant the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to the leaders of each country. Brazil and Argentina have taken a major step in stemming the tide of nuclear proliferation. It is now time for the United Sates to demonstrate leadership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1996 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Katherine Lane's husband suggested Saturday morning that they swap their .22-caliber revolver for a teddy bear, she could not believe her ears. Through 26 years of marriage, she said, her husband had insisted on keeping the weapon, even though she had wanted to get rid of it and had stored it in the garage to keep it out of reach of the Chino couple's four children. "Let me tell you, I was shocked," Katherine Lane as she and son Colton handed over the gun to a police officer.
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