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Robert Wise

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1993
The American Cinematheque will present a weekend salute to Robert Wise beginning Friday at the Directors Guild, 7920 Sunset Blvd. At 7 p.m. there will be a screening of "The Haunting," at 9:30 "The Set-Up" and "Odds Against Tomorrow." Saturday, there will be a symposium with Wise at 10 a.m. Films to be screened that day are "The Sound of Music," 1 p.m.; "Blood on the Moon," 5 p.m.; "The Curse of the Cat People," 7:15 p.m., and "The Day the Earth Stood Still," 9:15 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Susan King
This post has been corrected. Please see note at bottom for details. Gavin MacLeod was a fixture on television for years. From 1970 to 1977, he played sweet-natured news writer Murray Slaughter on CBS' "The Mary Tyler Moore Show. " No sooner did "MTM" close up shop than he moved over to ABC to appear as Captain Stubing on "The Love Boat," which cruised until 1986. To this day, MacLeod travels the seven seas as an ambassador for Princess Cruise Lines. The 82-year-old actor has had a diverse career: appearing on Broadway, guest-starring in countless series including "My Favorite Martian" and "Peter Gunn," and working with such directors as Blake Edwards ("Operation Petticoat")
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1998
Film critic Leonard Maltin will moderate "An Evening With Robert Wise" on Dec. 2 at the Alex Theatre in Glendale. Wise, the Oscar-winning director-producer of "West Side Story" and "The Sound of Music," received the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award in 1988. The 8 p.m. event will include clips from his films, plus an on-stage discussion between Maltin and Wise. Tickets are $10. Information: (800) 233-3123.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Robert Wise, the highly honored film editor-turned-director who won four Academy Awards for producing and directing "West Side Story" and "The Sound of Music," died Wednesday. He was 91. Wise, who edited Orson Welles' landmark "Citizen Kane" and Welles' "The Magnificent Ambersons," became ill at home Wednesday morning and died of heart failure at UCLA Medical Center, said Lawrence Mirisch, a family friend and a motion picture agent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Whatever their image as enemies of promise and even killers, critics do have finer feelings. They often find themselves rooting for those orphan, underdog films that have more virtue than commercial viability. It looks as if "Rooftops" will join that small company of films that you wish--for a variety of reasons--would do better.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2001
Robert Wise, whose credits include editing "Citizen Kane" and directing the Oscar-winning musicals "West Side Story" and "The Sound of Music," will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Newport Beach Film Festival on Sept. 28. The award will be bestowed on the 87-year-old director at a celebration at the Lido Theater in Newport Beach following a 50th anniversary screening at 7 p.m. of another of his famous films, "The Day the Earth Stood Still."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Robert Wise, the highly honored film editor-turned-director who won four Academy Awards for producing and directing "West Side Story" and "The Sound of Music," died Wednesday. He was 91. Wise, who edited Orson Welles' landmark "Citizen Kane" and Welles' "The Magnificent Ambersons," became ill at home Wednesday morning and died of heart failure at UCLA Medical Center, said Lawrence Mirisch, a family friend and a motion picture agent.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Wise, the Oscar-winning director of 1961's "West Side Story" and 1965's "The Sound of Music," returns to the director's chair with the Showtime drama "A Storm in Summer," premiering Sunday on the cable network. The family drama, set in 1969, focuses on the growing friendship between an embittered Jewish deli owner (Peter Falk) and an African American boy (Aaron Meeks) from the inner city.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2003 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
The controversy over renowned director Robert Wise's newspaper column endorsing Miramax Film Corp.'s "Gangs of New York" for an Academy Award took a new twist Friday when a publicist working on the studio's Oscar campaign admitted that he actually penned the piece. Murray Weissman said he wrote the article praising "Gangs of New York" director Martin Scorsese.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1998 | Charles Champlin, Charles Champlin was the arts editor of The Times from 1965 to 1991
Robert Wise this week becomes the 26th recipient of the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award, the most prestigious film honor outside those given by the motion picture academy itself. At that, he has four Oscars from the academy, two each (as director and producer) for "The Sound of Music" and "West Side Story," as well as the Irving Thalberg Award for his body of work.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2003 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
The controversy over renowned director Robert Wise's newspaper column endorsing Miramax Film Corp.'s "Gangs of New York" for an Academy Award took a new twist Friday when a publicist working on the studio's Oscar campaign admitted that he actually penned the piece. Murray Weissman said he wrote the article praising "Gangs of New York" director Martin Scorsese.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2002 | SUSAN KING and RACHEL USLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The leader of the Sharks and the leader of the Jets, sitting side by side. Bernardo and Riff brought together by a common affection for Robert Wise, director of the Oscar-winning movie musical "West Side Story." "We are forever in his debt for the opportunity of a lifetime," said George Chakiris, who won a best supporting actor Oscar as Bernardo. "He believed in what we were doing, and it created a bond that has made us a family to this day."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2002 | MIKE THOMAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The A&E television adaptation of "The Magnificent Ambersons" scheduled for Sunday has reawakened interest in the original 1942 Orson Welles film, long considered one of the most tragic victims of studio interference in Hollywood history. Even the press kit for the A&E TV movie includes the famous Welles quote, "They destroyed 'Ambersons,' and it destroyed me." Despite its misfortunes, "The Magnificent Ambersons" has been a deeply influential film.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2001
Robert Wise, whose credits include editing "Citizen Kane" and directing the Oscar-winning musicals "West Side Story" and "The Sound of Music," will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Newport Beach Film Festival on Sept. 28. The award will be bestowed on the 87-year-old director at a celebration at the Lido Theater in Newport Beach following a 50th anniversary screening at 7 p.m. of another of his famous films, "The Day the Earth Stood Still."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Wise, the Oscar-winning director of 1961's "West Side Story" and 1965's "The Sound of Music," returns to the director's chair with the Showtime drama "A Storm in Summer," premiering Sunday on the cable network. The family drama, set in 1969, focuses on the growing friendship between an embittered Jewish deli owner (Peter Falk) and an African American boy (Aaron Meeks) from the inner city.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1998
Film critic Leonard Maltin will moderate "An Evening With Robert Wise" on Dec. 2 at the Alex Theatre in Glendale. Wise, the Oscar-winning director-producer of "West Side Story" and "The Sound of Music," received the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award in 1988. The 8 p.m. event will include clips from his films, plus an on-stage discussion between Maltin and Wise. Tickets are $10. Information: (800) 233-3123.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1998 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a boy growing up in Connorsville, Ind., Robert Wise said he would make regular trips to the three movie houses in town and sit transfixed in the dark "watching those silent yet eloquent shadows" on the screen. "I never guessed I would have the power to influence others as those images influenced me," Wise recalled. "Movies have been my life's work, the only vocation I've ever known."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1994 | TERRY PRISTIN, Terry Pristin is a Times staff writer
Who could be better qualified to assess the Oscar contenders for best picture than a director and producer whose career has spanned most of the modern era of filmmaking? Robert Wise picked up his first Oscar nomination more than a half-century ago, when his editing of the 1941 "Citizen Kane" was recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1998
Robert Wise co-directed the 1961 film version of "West Side Story" with Jerome Robbins, for which the pair shared an Academy Award for best director. In an interview with Charles Champlin, he reminisced about the experience. "He was a tremendous talent and it's a big loss," Robert Wise said. "I don't know anyone who did a more brilliant job of telling stories on stage through dance and music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1998 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a boy growing up in Connorsville, Ind., Robert Wise said he would make regular trips to the three movie houses in town and sit transfixed in the dark "watching those silent yet eloquent shadows" on the screen. "I never guessed I would have the power to influence others as those images influenced me," Wise recalled. "Movies have been my life's work, the only vocation I've ever known."
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