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NEWS
December 11, 1988
A project to provide foster care in Kansas for AIDS-infected infants from New York and California is among 54 organizations in 25 states that will share $16.7 million in grants from a private foundation. Donations will range from $5,000 to more than $1.8 million, said the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation of Princeton, N.J.
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SCIENCE
February 25, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
Americans are still carrying too much weight, but a new federal study offers a glimmer of hope amongst the nation's smallest eaters: Between 2003 and 2012, obesity among children between 2 and 5 years of age has declined from 14% to 8% -- a 43% decrease in just under a decade. And much of that reduction has come in the past three to four years, as efforts to address a burgeoning child obesity crisis have escalated. The new figures came as First Lady Michelle Obama and her "Let's Move" campaign against childhood obesity launched new initiatives designed to reduce marketing for unhealthy foods and beverages seen by children in schools.
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NEWS
August 5, 1987
Despite objections from religious groups, the Los Angeles Board of Education voted unanimously to accept a grant of nearly $600,000 to pay for the opening of three high school health clinics that will provide a variety of health services, including dispensing contraceptives. After a brief discussion, the board voted 7-0 to accept the grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a New Jersey-based philanthropic organization that has helped pay for 24 school-based clinics across the nation.
NEWS
July 7, 2010 | By Tami Dennis, Los Angeles Times
"The most common question people have about health reform is 'How will I be affected?' The answer, of course, depends on the individual, as different demographic groups will be affected very differently." So begins a series of briefs from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The briefs, released Tuesday, analyze the expected impact of the healthcare overhaul on young adults, children, older people and (sort of) people who buy insurance on the individual or small-group market. The latter is a bit too complex to easily distill, it seems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1988
The Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health will use a $582,000 private grant to identify mentally ill people facing jail sentences and divert them from incarceration into mental health and support services. The grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Mental Health Services Program, the nation's largest health care philanthropy, will serve 2,000 city residents with chronic mental illness, according to foundation officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2001 | Religion News Service
One of the largest philanthropy organizations in the nation said this week it will devote $100 million to faith-based volunteer groups that serve the elderly, disabled and chronically ill. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation hopes the money will boost the number of participants in its 19-year-old Faith in Action program, which gives grants to faith-based volunteer groups nationwide to serve those targeted populations.
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | Associated Press
A leading philanthropic foundation is paying $3.5 million for a two-hour time slot that NBC's news division will fill with a program examining health care reform. The joint venture is unprecedented in network television, NBC News President Andrew Lack said Tuesday. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a nonprofit organization that makes grants in support of health care, will spend $2.5 million to underwrite the broadcast time for the program, which is to air without commercials from 9 to 11 p.m.
NEWS
July 7, 2010 | By Tami Dennis, Los Angeles Times
"The most common question people have about health reform is 'How will I be affected?' The answer, of course, depends on the individual, as different demographic groups will be affected very differently." So begins a series of briefs from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The briefs, released Tuesday, analyze the expected impact of the healthcare overhaul on young adults, children, older people and (sort of) people who buy insurance on the individual or small-group market. The latter is a bit too complex to easily distill, it seems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1987
I read with amazement and chagrin the article (July 23) by Pamela Moreland regarding the grant to San Fernando High School for a clinic that will dispense contraceptives and birth control counseling--in a community that does not want the clinic on religious grounds, as well as sociocultural reasons. Why would an institution, in this case the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (the nation's largest underwriter of school-based clinics), insist on making this grant where it is not wanted?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1987
As a former high school teacher, I applaud Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and all the educators at San Fernando High School for their efforts to establish an on-campus medical clinic. Why must parents continue to look at only the birth control angle of the story? Don't they realize that many of their daughters and sons encounter other medical problems that require attention? Many times, in only three years of teaching, girls came to me wondering about pains, frequent headaches, odd patches on their skin and the like and I was not capable of telling them anything other than to tell their parents.
HEALTH
December 28, 2009 | By Amber Dance >>>
Preventive healthcare has been touted by politicians as a sure-fire method to slash healthcare costs by saving on future treatment expenses. And it's easy to believe them -- surely, we reason, it's better to treat high cholesterol before it turns into a heart attack or catch cancer early on. Better it may be, but economists present a different picture as far as costs go: Although preventive medicine is certainly desirable, it will not necessarily ease...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2001 | Religion News Service
One of the largest philanthropy organizations in the nation said this week it will devote $100 million to faith-based volunteer groups that serve the elderly, disabled and chronically ill. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation hopes the money will boost the number of participants in its 19-year-old Faith in Action program, which gives grants to faith-based volunteer groups nationwide to serve those targeted populations.
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | Associated Press
A leading philanthropic foundation is paying $3.5 million for a two-hour time slot that NBC's news division will fill with a program examining health care reform. The joint venture is unprecedented in network television, NBC News President Andrew Lack said Tuesday. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a nonprofit organization that makes grants in support of health care, will spend $2.5 million to underwrite the broadcast time for the program, which is to air without commercials from 9 to 11 p.m.
NEWS
May 18, 1992 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Formation of the nation's first comprehensive center to study how substance abuse affects society will be announced in New York today with support from a consortium of foundations, banks and businesses. The center, affiliated with Columbia University, will bring together all professional disciplines of the university's graduate schools and faculties. It will be headed by Joseph A. Califano Jr.
NEWS
September 20, 1989
Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp was jeered during a visit to a Hartford, Conn., soup kitchen before he gave a speech pledging to speed up government aid to the homeless. Kemp was surrounded by reporters and photographers in the doorway of St. Elizabeth's House soup kitchen, and never made it inside the room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1988
The Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health will use a $582,000 private grant to identify mentally ill people facing jail sentences and divert them from incarceration into mental health and support services. The grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Mental Health Services Program, the nation's largest health care philanthropy, will serve 2,000 city residents with chronic mental illness, according to foundation officials.
NEWS
May 18, 1992 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Formation of the nation's first comprehensive center to study how substance abuse affects society will be announced in New York today with support from a consortium of foundations, banks and businesses. The center, affiliated with Columbia University, will bring together all professional disciplines of the university's graduate schools and faculties. It will be headed by Joseph A. Califano Jr.
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