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Robert Worth Bingham

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NEWS
December 4, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Crown Publishers next week will publish a book that contains startling theories about the powerful Bingham family of Louisville, Ky. Earlier this year Macmillan Publishing Co. dropped the book project after challenges by the family. The book, "The Binghams of Louisville: The Dark History Behind One of America's Great Fortunes," theorizes that family patriarch Robert Worth Bingham founded the family fortune in 1917 when he "murdered his second wife for money," according to a statement by Crown.
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NEWS
December 4, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Crown Publishers next week will publish a book that contains startling theories about the powerful Bingham family of Louisville, Ky. Earlier this year Macmillan Publishing Co. dropped the book project after challenges by the family. The book, "The Binghams of Louisville: The Dark History Behind One of America's Great Fortunes," theorizes that family patriarch Robert Worth Bingham founded the family fortune in 1917 when he "murdered his second wife for money," according to a statement by Crown.
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NEWS
July 21, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Macmillan Publishing Co. will announce today that it is canceling publication of "The Binghams of Louisville," the biography of the Kentucky newspaper dynasty that contains startling theories about the mysterious death of heiress Mary Flagler Bingham that provided the family with its fortune.
NEWS
July 21, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Macmillan Publishing Co. will announce today that it is canceling publication of "The Binghams of Louisville," the biography of the Kentucky newspaper dynasty that contains startling theories about the mysterious death of heiress Mary Flagler Bingham that provided the family with its fortune.
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The news accounts, now 70 years old, offer only fragments of the "ghastly drama" that surrounded the marriage of Mary Kenan Flagler Bingham, "the richest woman in America." She was the widow of Standard Oil co-founder Henry Flagler and her estate was worth between $60 million and $100 million. Her bridegroom was Judge Robert Worth Bingham, a Kentucky lawyer without independent means. Their wedding in 1916 made headlines, even in New York. And so did her mysterious death eight months later.
NEWS
April 29, 1995
Mary Caperton Bingham, 90, matriarch of a family that built up a Louisville, Ky., publishing empire that was later torn apart. The civic leader and philanthropist had risen to greet those who had praised her at a Rotary dinner, and began her response by saying she was so flattered that "the best thing would be for a big pink cloud to come down and take me away." Then she collapsed.
BOOKS
March 20, 1988 | Digby Diehl, Diehl is the president of the Los Angeles Center of P.E.N. International.
The Binghams of Louisville have been referred to as "the Kennedys of the South," but their money, power, philanthropy, political influence, and struggles were not well known outside Kentucky until 1985 when Sallie Bingham announced that she intended to sell her shares in the family-owned Louisville Courier-Journal and Louisville Times. That announcement set off a family feud which erupted in national headlines and ended with the sale of the entire Bingham media empire, including newspapers, radio, and television stations, for about $450 million.
NEWS
August 15, 1988 | Reuters
Barry Bingham Sr., who headed one of America's great 20th-Century media dynasties that included the Louisville Courier-Journal and then disbanded it when his children started feuding, died today at his home. He was 82. Bingham, a one-time power in Southern Democratic politics, had been suffering from a brain tumor that was diagnosed late last year.
NEWS
December 4, 1999
Joey Adams, 88, a veteran Borscht Belt comedian who also wrote prolifically about joke-telling. A Brooklyn tailor's son, he was a New York fixture who made his show business debut in vaudeville when he was 19. Adams, a contemporary of Henny Youngman, Milton Berle and George Burns, became a regular attraction in the Catskills and later made frequent television appearances as a guest on "The Ed Sullivan Show" and "The Jackie Gleason Show."
BOOKS
February 19, 1989 | Reva Berger Tooley, Tooley holds a masters degree in psychology and is a magazine journalist. and
"Women have often been silenced in history, our voices discredited or blotted out. We have been silenced to preserve elements in the hierarchy, political or social, public or private, institutional or personal. I chose to speak." Sallie Bingham's feminist voice in the prelude to her memoir, "Passion and Prejudice," has the crackle of distant Confederate gunfire.
NEWS
January 19, 1986 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Twenty years ago this summer, Robert Worth Bingham III was going to lead this genteel, pleasantly lazy river city to great heights. As the first of five children born to Mary and Barry Bingham Sr., owners of the Courier-Journal and Louisville Times newspapers and a clutch of printing and broadcasting companies, Worth was his father's choice to carry on a journalistic empire whose influence stretched far beyond its regional audience.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
When she was growing up on a secluded estate in Louisville, Sallie Bingham felt the presence of "this lurking something" in the Big House, the family name for the grim mansion on the Ohio River that housed her aristocratic tribe. When she went back last year for the funeral of her father, newspaper publisher Barry Bingham Sr., she felt it again, she said. "It's still there . . . the hovering presence of something unexplained that has malevolence."
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