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Robert Wright

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Robert Wright, a Tony Award-winning composer and lyricist whose songwriting collaboration with George "Chet" Forrest included the hit Broadway musicals "Song of Norway," "Kismet" and "Grand Hotel," has died. He was 90. Wright, a three-time Oscar nominee, died of natural causes Wednesday at his home in Miami, said Doug Holmes, his assistant.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | By Zachary Karabell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We live in an era of economic anxiety. There have been other such eras, but this one seems particularly acute. Though the actual fortunes of Americans differ widely, there is a shared sense of something not right. That sentiment acts as a negative glue, binding Americans in a collective malaise. In the words of economist and professor Robert E. Wright, America today is a FUBAR economy, a system that is "fouled up beyond all recognition. " In a series of essays that constitute his uneven yet entertaining book, Wright explores key examples of the "Fubarnomics" that characterize the United States today.
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BUSINESS
July 15, 2001 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Wright, NBC Inc.'s chief executive, holds the record as the longest-running head of any broadcast network for good reason. Since he took the helm in 1986--shortly after General Electric Co. bought its parent company, RCA--Wright has turned NBC into the nation's most profitable network with a disciplined financial approach that often chafes against Hollywood's free-spending style.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | Jack Miles, Miles is distinguished professor of English and religious studies at UC Irvine and general editor of the forthcoming "The Norton Anthology of World Religions."
The Evolution of God Robert Wright Little, Brown: 576 pp. $25.99 The Case for God Karen Armstrong Alfred A. Knopf: 432 pp., $27.95 Until the discovery of DNA's double helix by James Watson and Francis Crick, prehistory was entirely the province of paleontologists and archaeologists. "But in the past few years," Nicholas Wade wrote in his 2006 book, "Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors" (a work praised by Watson himself, among many others)
BUSINESS
May 2, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that left Home Box Office executives angry and puzzled, NBC President Robert Wright recently wrote to select members of Hollywood's production community soliciting views about "The Sopranos" and its influence on popular entertainment--at the same time stressing that the pay-television series is "a show which we could not and would not air on NBC because of the violence, language and nudity."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | Jack Miles, Miles is distinguished professor of English and religious studies at UC Irvine and general editor of the forthcoming "The Norton Anthology of World Religions."
The Evolution of God Robert Wright Little, Brown: 576 pp. $25.99 The Case for God Karen Armstrong Alfred A. Knopf: 432 pp., $27.95 Until the discovery of DNA's double helix by James Watson and Francis Crick, prehistory was entirely the province of paleontologists and archaeologists. "But in the past few years," Nicholas Wade wrote in his 2006 book, "Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors" (a work praised by Watson himself, among many others)
BOOKS
September 4, 1994 | Sara Lippincott, Sara Lippincott, formerly an editor at The New Yorker, teaches nonfiction writing at Caltech
In "The Moral Animal," Robert Wright is concerned with the nature of human nature. How do we shape our own lives; in fact, do we shape them at all, or are we driven by biological imperatives? Evolutionary psychologists consider our "mental organs" and their various behaviors to be products of natural selection--that is, to have evolved along lines that maximize survival.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Webber Wright, the Little Rock, Ark., federal judge who threw out Paula Corbin Jones' sexual harassment lawsuit, often shares folksy details of her life with lawyers and jurors in her courtroom. While some starchy lawyers frown on that practice, those familiar with Wright say that her style only illustrates her self-confidence and independence--two qualities that helped propel this Republican appointee to issue a ruling that was cause for celebration in the Democratic White House.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | By Zachary Karabell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We live in an era of economic anxiety. There have been other such eras, but this one seems particularly acute. Though the actual fortunes of Americans differ widely, there is a shared sense of something not right. That sentiment acts as a negative glue, binding Americans in a collective malaise. In the words of economist and professor Robert E. Wright, America today is a FUBAR economy, a system that is "fouled up beyond all recognition. " In a series of essays that constitute his uneven yet entertaining book, Wright explores key examples of the "Fubarnomics" that characterize the United States today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Vincent Wright, 88, a longtime television writer whose credits included "Maverick," "Bonanza" and "Lost in Space," died of acute bronchitis and pneumonia June 17 at Los Robles Regional Medical Center in Thousand Oaks. In 1958, Wright was nearly 40 years old and the supervisor of motion pictures in the engineering division of what was then known as the Boeing Airplane Co. in Seattle when he wrote his first TV script, an episode of "Maverick."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Robert Wright, a Tony Award-winning composer and lyricist whose songwriting collaboration with George "Chet" Forrest included the hit Broadway musicals "Song of Norway," "Kismet" and "Grand Hotel," has died. He was 90. Wright, a three-time Oscar nominee, died of natural causes Wednesday at his home in Miami, said Doug Holmes, his assistant.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2001 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Wright, NBC Inc.'s chief executive, holds the record as the longest-running head of any broadcast network for good reason. Since he took the helm in 1986--shortly after General Electric Co. bought its parent company, RCA--Wright has turned NBC into the nation's most profitable network with a disciplined financial approach that often chafes against Hollywood's free-spending style.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2001 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that establishes a new line of succession at NBC, the network promoted NBC News President Andrew Lack to president and chief operating officer Tuesday, giving the network a second in command for the first time since 1986, when Robert Wright became president. Wright was named chairman and will remain chief executive. The move frees Wright, 58, who also is vice chairman of NBC parent General Electric Co.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that left Home Box Office executives angry and puzzled, NBC President Robert Wright recently wrote to select members of Hollywood's production community soliciting views about "The Sopranos" and its influence on popular entertainment--at the same time stressing that the pay-television series is "a show which we could not and would not air on NBC because of the violence, language and nudity."
BOOKS
February 6, 2000 | MICHAEL SHERMER, Michael Shermer is the author of "Why People Believe Weird Things" and, most recently, "How We Believe: The Search for God in an Age of Science." He is the publisher of Skeptic magazine
Humans are pattern-seeking, storytelling animals. We look for and find patterns in our world and in our lives, then weave narratives around those patterns to bring them to life and give them meaning. Such is the stuff of which myth, religion, history and science are made. Sometimes the patterns we find represent reality--DNA as the basis of heredity or the fossil record as the history of life, for example.
BOOKS
February 6, 2000 | MICHAEL SHERMER, Michael Shermer is the author of "Why People Believe Weird Things" and, most recently, "How We Believe: The Search for God in an Age of Science." He is the publisher of Skeptic magazine
Humans are pattern-seeking, storytelling animals. We look for and find patterns in our world and in our lives, then weave narratives around those patterns to bring them to life and give them meaning. Such is the stuff of which myth, religion, history and science are made. Sometimes the patterns we find represent reality--DNA as the basis of heredity or the fossil record as the history of life, for example.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Vincent Wright, 88, a longtime television writer whose credits included "Maverick," "Bonanza" and "Lost in Space," died of acute bronchitis and pneumonia June 17 at Los Robles Regional Medical Center in Thousand Oaks. In 1958, Wright was nearly 40 years old and the supervisor of motion pictures in the engineering division of what was then known as the Boeing Airplane Co. in Seattle when he wrote his first TV script, an episode of "Maverick."
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Webber Wright, the Little Rock, Ark., federal judge who threw out Paula Corbin Jones' sexual harassment lawsuit, often shares folksy details of her life with lawyers and jurors in her courtroom. While some starchy lawyers frown on that practice, those familiar with Wright say that her style only illustrates her self-confidence and independence--two qualities that helped propel this Republican appointee to issue a ruling that was cause for celebration in the Democratic White House.
BOOKS
September 4, 1994 | Sara Lippincott, Sara Lippincott, formerly an editor at The New Yorker, teaches nonfiction writing at Caltech
In "The Moral Animal," Robert Wright is concerned with the nature of human nature. How do we shape our own lives; in fact, do we shape them at all, or are we driven by biological imperatives? Evolutionary psychologists consider our "mental organs" and their various behaviors to be products of natural selection--that is, to have evolved along lines that maximize survival.
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