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June 18, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar. and
Artist Robert Yarber was just 15 when the harsher realities of life were thrust upon him. Born and raised in Dallas, he went with his family on Nov. 22, 1963, to cheer the Kennedy motorcade as it passed through his hometown. Half an hour later, riding home from the parade, he heard on the car radio that the President had been shot.
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June 18, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar. and
Artist Robert Yarber was just 15 when the harsher realities of life were thrust upon him. Born and raised in Dallas, he went with his family on Nov. 22, 1963, to cheer the Kennedy motorcade as it passed through his hometown. Half an hour later, riding home from the parade, he heard on the car radio that the President had been shot.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1986 | COLIN GARDNER
"Artificial Paradise" is the title of an eclectic group show that brings together artists as wide ranging as Robert Yarber, Michael McMillen and Llyn Foulkes in an attempt to explore some of the more painterly elements of that slippery "genre" called Neo-Surrealism. The title is taken from Baudelaire, although it has more to do with a 1985 German exhibition of the same name that examined painting and art collecting as a form of psychological and aesthetic escapism.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1986 | COLIN GARDNER
"Artificial Paradise" is the title of an eclectic group show that brings together artists as wide ranging as Robert Yarber, Michael McMillen and Llyn Foulkes in an attempt to explore some of the more painterly elements of that slippery "genre" called Neo-Surrealism. The title is taken from Baudelaire, although it has more to do with a 1985 German exhibition of the same name that examined painting and art collecting as a form of psychological and aesthetic escapism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1994 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Exhibitions that enlist the aid of art in the service of explicating the sense of a city or locale are notoriously difficult to pull off. "Love in the Ruins: Art and the Inspiration of L.A." is but the latest casualty. The show, which opened Friday at the Long Beach Museum of Art, is an ambitious effort to articulate a complex picture of Los Angeles through the work of 23 artists.
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August 27, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
Art Against AIDS, a campaign that has already raised $4.7 million for AIDS research, education and patient care through art auctions and other fund-raisers in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco, returns to Los Angeles in September with a four-day auction featuring contemporary art from about 90 artists. Organizers of the Sept.
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August 8, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
A time for love, murder, dreams, free-floating anxiety, film shoots and clandestine refrigerator raids, night has long been a favorite of poets, criminals, ghosts and neurotics. At the Muckenthaler Cultural Center through Sept. 22, guest curator Jim Reed has mapped out a guided tour of the wee hours, based on the work of 38 artists. The concept is attractive, even if most of the art consists of blandly unexceptional figurative paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The World of Tomorrow" is a superbly installed and impeccably selected 13-artist exhibition at Thomas Solomon's Garage. Curated by New York writer Douglas Blau, the show's hauntingly beautiful landscapes and cityscapes give solid shape to a remarkably refined, accessible and generous curatorial sensibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1995 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"June Bride (. . . the bride strips bare)," a group show of work by women at Sherry Frumkin Gallery, is full of (dirty) white lace and (broken) promises, plastic pearls and dead flowers. There are also brutal heels, cheap valentines, lead underthings and inedible chocolates arranged in silver foil cups, which turn out to have been cast from nipples--perhaps the ultimate anti-fetishes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1994 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The inspiration for "The Turkish Bath," Phyllis Green's show at Jan Baum Gallery, is J.A.D. Ingres' painting of the same name, one of art history's most notorious odes to Orientalism. The hot-house atmosphere Ingres incarnates--all damp flesh, intertwined limbs and Near Eastern froufrou--becomes, in Green's hands, both hyperbolic and irresistible. Green distills things into sculptural essences.
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