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Robert Zemeckis

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Oscar season means hopefuls in the race for the trophies make their faces seen around town, and that doesn't mean just for film academy voters or the press. Case in point: Actress Keira Knightley and director Robert Zemeckis both have films that have great awards potential and both are making in-person appearances at the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre in the next week. On Sunday, the Cinematheque is screening "Flight" as part of a multi-film tribute to Zemeckis' work, and the filmmaker himself will be there following the 7:30 p.m. screening.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2013 | By John Horn
Why the long face, Mr. Depp? Perhaps because there's no question “The Lone Ranger” is a catastrophe. Produced for close to $250 million, the Johnny Depp-starring update of the old radio and television serial grossed a measly $29.4 million in its first three-day weekend (it took in $48.9 million since its July 3 premiere). REVIEW: Not even Johnny Depp can rescue 'The Lone Ranger' Analysts say Disney consequently could have to take a write-down of about $100 million on the flop.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By Susan King
Robert Zemeckis, who won the best director Oscar for 1994's "Forrest Gump," is the recipient of the Palm Springs International Film Festival's Director of the Year award for his latest film, "Flight," starring Denzel Washington  as a pilot who is dealing with addiction.  The  awards gala will be held Jan. 5 at the Palm Springs Convention Center. The 24th annual festival runs Jan. 3-14. "For 35 years, Robert Zemeckis has been creating some of the most iconic and indelible images in cinema, garnering international acclaim as a filmmaker of extraordinary vision," said festival chairman Harold Matzner in a statement Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Alexandra the Great "48," Blaze Starr, Tempest Storm, Lili St. Cyr, Candy Cotton, Sunny Dare, Gypsy Rose Lee: The names are as exotic as the performers themselves. They belong to women who bared skin in burlesque shows, long before the practice evolved into modern-day stripping. "I don't think today's stripping is sexy, but back then it was. They were very much into the 'tease,' figuring out how little they could show," says Leslie Zemeckis, the author of a new book on the history of burlesque called "Behind the Burly Q" (Skyhorse Publishing, $24.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2013 | By Noel Murray
Flight Paramount, $29.99; Blu-ray, $39.99 Available on VOD beginning Feb. 5 "Flight" marks Robert Zemeckis' return to live-action filmmaking after a decade-plus of making motion-capture animated features, and it proves that Zemeckis still has the strongest visual storytelling chops of any blockbuster director not named Steven Spielberg and still knows how to elicit great performances from movie stars. Denzel Washington is stunningly heartbreaking as an alcoholic airline pilot who saves nearly 100 people when his jet malfunctions, then has to deal with the public scrutiny over whether he's a hero or a heel.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | Associated Press
"Forrest Gump" director Robert Zemeckis won the top award from the Director's Guild of America on Saturday night. Zemeckis beat out the directors of such critical hits as "Pulp Fiction" and "Four Weddings and a Funeral." The prize was announced at a ceremony at the Marriott Marquis hotel in New York and was presented to Zemeckis later Saturday in Los Angeles at a second ceremony. The Director's Guild award often is an indicator of who will win the Academy Award for best director.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2007 | Sheigh Crabtree, Special to The Times
Angelina Jolie's lips look even fuller than usual. She's emerging naked from a pool of dank cave water, rivulets of gold streaming gently down her body. "Giiiif meee sonnnn," she coos, in an Old English accent. Her flaxen hair is braided down her back in a long tail that slowly undulates and slaps the dark pool around her. She continues to purr enticements about making babies as a virtual camera circles 360 degrees panning around her long limbs and waist.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1994 | DAVID KRONKE, David Kronke is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Robert Zemeckis didn't set out to become a techno-wonk filmmaker. But once he became one, he became one of Hollywood's most accomplished. "I don't love 'em," he says of effects-driven movies. "I got associated with them in the first 'Back to the Future.' It's interesting--people say, 'That was a big effects movie.' But there were only 30 shots (employing effects), and those were mostly lightning. They weren't that complicated.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
As an experienced pilot who has logged about 1,600 hours in the cockpit, director Robert Zemeckis understands stalls, turbulence and dead stick landings. But when it came to making "Flight," his new movie about an alcoholic commercial airline pilot, the "Forrest Gump" filmmaker had to contend with a different set of aerodynamics: Hollywood's reluctance to clear difficult dramas for takeoff. More than a decade in the making, "Flight" marks Zemeckis' first live-action film since 2000's "Cast Away" and an atypical wager for Paramount Pictures, which financed the film's $31-million budget.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
A commanding performance elevates a film, but it can expose it as well, underlining that the surrounding material is not up to the standard it sets. That's the case with "Flight," a solid, often engrossing film that doesn't engage us overall the way Denzel Washington's work does. Unquestionably one of America's best actors, Washington has increasingly relished playing morally ambivalent characters, and in this film, "Forrest Gump" director Robert Zemeckis' first live-action effort in a dozen years, he gets to play one of the most intriguing, Whip Whitaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Disney's frenetic live-action/animated comedy "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" was the second-highest-grossing film of 1988, earning more than $156 million. The comedy won three Academy Awards and transformed its lead, British actor Bob Hoskins, into a bona fide Hollywood star. But more importantly, the film marked the first time beloved animated characters from rival studios - such as Disney's Mickey Mouse and Warner Bros.' Bugs Bunny - appeared together. The traditionally hand-drawn animated film heralded a renewed appreciation of the Golden Age of animation and spawned the modern-era of animation, especially at Disney.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2013 | By Noel Murray
Flight Paramount, $29.99; Blu-ray, $39.99 Available on VOD beginning Feb. 5 "Flight" marks Robert Zemeckis' return to live-action filmmaking after a decade-plus of making motion-capture animated features, and it proves that Zemeckis still has the strongest visual storytelling chops of any blockbuster director not named Steven Spielberg and still knows how to elicit great performances from movie stars. Denzel Washington is stunningly heartbreaking as an alcoholic airline pilot who saves nearly 100 people when his jet malfunctions, then has to deal with the public scrutiny over whether he's a hero or a heel.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By Susan King
Robert Zemeckis, who won the best director Oscar for 1994's "Forrest Gump," is the recipient of the Palm Springs International Film Festival's Director of the Year award for his latest film, "Flight," starring Denzel Washington  as a pilot who is dealing with addiction.  The  awards gala will be held Jan. 5 at the Palm Springs Convention Center. The 24th annual festival runs Jan. 3-14. "For 35 years, Robert Zemeckis has been creating some of the most iconic and indelible images in cinema, garnering international acclaim as a filmmaker of extraordinary vision," said festival chairman Harold Matzner in a statement Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Oscar season means hopefuls in the race for the trophies make their faces seen around town, and that doesn't mean just for film academy voters or the press. Case in point: Actress Keira Knightley and director Robert Zemeckis both have films that have great awards potential and both are making in-person appearances at the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre in the next week. On Sunday, the Cinematheque is screening "Flight" as part of a multi-film tribute to Zemeckis' work, and the filmmaker himself will be there following the 7:30 p.m. screening.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2012 | By Susan King
With awards season in full swing, two Oscar hopefuls -- director Robert Zemeckis ("Flight") and actor Richard Gere ("Arbitrage") -- are being feted with retrospectives at the American Cinematheque. "Who Framed Smart Entertainment: An In-Person Tribute to Robert Zemeckis" is to kick off Nov. 26 at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica with two of the director's early works: the 1984 hit comedy-romance-adventure "Romancing the Stone," with Kathleen Turner and Michael Douglas, and the 1980 comedy "Used Cars," with Kurt Russell and Jack Warden.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
A commanding performance elevates a film, but it can expose it as well, underlining that the surrounding material is not up to the standard it sets. That's the case with "Flight," a solid, often engrossing film that doesn't engage us overall the way Denzel Washington's work does. Unquestionably one of America's best actors, Washington has increasingly relished playing morally ambivalent characters, and in this film, "Forrest Gump" director Robert Zemeckis' first live-action effort in a dozen years, he gets to play one of the most intriguing, Whip Whitaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Disney's frenetic live-action/animated comedy "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" was the second-highest-grossing film of 1988, earning more than $156 million. The comedy won three Academy Awards and transformed its lead, British actor Bob Hoskins, into a bona fide Hollywood star. But more importantly, the film marked the first time beloved animated characters from rival studios - such as Disney's Mickey Mouse and Warner Bros.' Bugs Bunny - appeared together. The traditionally hand-drawn animated film heralded a renewed appreciation of the Golden Age of animation and spawned the modern-era of animation, especially at Disney.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1995 | Chris Willman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In 1994, it seemed, you might have been classified as either a "Forrest Gump" person or a "Pulp Fiction" person, just as once upon a time you might have been asked whether you were a Beatles person or a Stones person. This was the year's Rorschach that presumably would determine whether you tended toward naughty or nice. And these were the two pictures that, above all others, captured America's adult imagination in the last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2012 | By John Horn
People who obsess about airline safety will doubtlessly be drawn to “Flight,” Nov. 2's drama about the culpability of alcoholic pilot Whip Whitaker (Denzel Washington) in an aviation disaster.  But there's one place you likely will never be able to see the movie: on an airplane. The fees that airlines pay for movies are but a small slice of a film's overall income, but in some cases can add up to several million dollars, which can benefit a risky drama like “Flight.” But Paramount Pictures, the film's financier and distributor, concedes “Flight” will be a tough sell to any airline, even though the carrier and the plane in the film are  fictional creations, and Whitaker's heroic flying may have saved countless lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
As an experienced pilot who has logged about 1,600 hours in the cockpit, director Robert Zemeckis understands stalls, turbulence and dead stick landings. But when it came to making "Flight," his new movie about an alcoholic commercial airline pilot, the "Forrest Gump" filmmaker had to contend with a different set of aerodynamics: Hollywood's reluctance to clear difficult dramas for takeoff. More than a decade in the making, "Flight" marks Zemeckis' first live-action film since 2000's "Cast Away" and an atypical wager for Paramount Pictures, which financed the film's $31-million budget.
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