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Roberta Peters

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January 31, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
Roberta Peters is celebrating her 36th season at the Metropolitan Opera, a record for a leading female singer at that institution. But, singing as she did Wednesday night in a recital in Marsee Auditorium at El Camino College, Peters might well go on for another 36 seasons. She is still pert and stagewise and the adroit mistress of a voice that shows only a few minor traces of wear.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1995 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the time-honored tradition of more is more, of leaving no seasonal chestnut unroasted, the Glendale Symphony ranged widely and long in its holiday concert at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Friday night. It had its ups and downs but was greeted by a sizable throng with consistently dutiful applause. Music director Keith Clark stormed on stage (more than once) and conducted like a linebacker, manhandling the music as if it were a running back at the goal line. This worked sometimes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1995 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the time-honored tradition of more is more, of leaving no seasonal chestnut unroasted, the Glendale Symphony ranged widely and long in its holiday concert at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Friday night. It had its ups and downs but was greeted by a sizable throng with consistently dutiful applause. Music director Keith Clark stormed on stage (more than once) and conducted like a linebacker, manhandling the music as if it were a running back at the goal line. This worked sometimes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES
Roberta Peters was 19 when she stood on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera House in New York to audition for the formidably difficult role of Queen of the Night in Mozart's "Die Zauberflote." "I sang the first aria, and I heard a voice say, 'Miss Peters, would you mind repeating that?' " she recalled over lunch recently at a nearby restaurant. "So I did. Then after the second time, from another part of the house, I heard, 'Miss Peters, Would you please repeat that one more time?'
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1988 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
The $64 question about the Pacific Symphony's New Year's Eve concert at Segerstrom Hall in Costa Mesa: What did soprano Roberta Peters stage-whisper to conductor Keith Clark between selections by Franz Lehar? Up until then, Clark had provided his distinguished soloist with heavy, dragging, occasionally overpowering accompaniment. Suddenly, everything changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1991 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Some aging prima donnas put on pounds, add chins and even retire from the stage--at a proper cue from deteriorating vocal cords. Then there is Roberta Peters, who used to be America's own sweetheart soprano. Still pert and trim and notably pretty, the one-time darling of the Met turned up again in a recital at the South Bay Center for the Arts at El Camino College, Saturday night. But, alas, time has passed and the singer has not chosen to acknowledge same.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES
Roberta Peters was 19 when she stood on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera House in New York to audition for the formidably difficult role of Queen of the Night in Mozart's "Die Zauberflote." "I sang the first aria, and I heard a voice say, 'Miss Peters, would you mind repeating that?' " she recalled over lunch recently at a nearby restaurant. "So I did. Then after the second time, from another part of the house, I heard, 'Miss Peters, Would you please repeat that one more time?'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1994 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former university professor was sentenced to 12 years in state prison Wednesday in a sexual molestation case sparked when photographs showing graphic abuse of a Newport Beach girl were found discarded on a Los Angeles street. Ronald Ruskjer, 44, a one-time faculty member at Loma Linda University's school of public health, wept and apologized during a 40-minute statement before a San Bernardino Superior Court judge.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Contralto Marian Anderson, who in 1955 became the first black woman to debut with the Metropolitan Opera, received a human rights award Friday from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Met colleague Roberta Peters presented the award to Anderson, who celebrated her 85th birthday at the luncheon ceremony. The honorary fellowship award cited Anderson for "her lifelong struggle for human rights, her deep sense of justice, her caring for people and her avowed friendship for Israel."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES
The Irvine Symphony will sponsor a four-concert series at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa in addition to a previously announced four-concert series at the new Irvine Barclay Theatre in Irvine. The 1990-91 series at the Center: * Nov. 1, 8 p.m.: A jazz concert with pianist George Shearing, vocalist Joe Williams and guitarist Joe Pass. * April 12, 8 p.m.: Barber's Piano Concerto, with soloist Leonid Kuzmin; and Brahms' Violin Concerto with soloist Haroutune Bedelian.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1991 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Some aging prima donnas put on pounds, add chins and even retire from the stage--at a proper cue from deteriorating vocal cords. Then there is Roberta Peters, who used to be America's own sweetheart soprano. Still pert and trim and notably pretty, the one-time darling of the Met turned up again in a recital at the South Bay Center for the Arts at El Camino College, Saturday night. But, alas, time has passed and the singer has not chosen to acknowledge same.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1988 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
The $64 question about the Pacific Symphony's New Year's Eve concert at Segerstrom Hall in Costa Mesa: What did soprano Roberta Peters stage-whisper to conductor Keith Clark between selections by Franz Lehar? Up until then, Clark had provided his distinguished soloist with heavy, dragging, occasionally overpowering accompaniment. Suddenly, everything changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
Roberta Peters is celebrating her 36th season at the Metropolitan Opera, a record for a leading female singer at that institution. But, singing as she did Wednesday night in a recital in Marsee Auditorium at El Camino College, Peters might well go on for another 36 seasons. She is still pert and stagewise and the adroit mistress of a voice that shows only a few minor traces of wear.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1988
After reading Chris Pasles' critique of the Pacific Symphony's "New Year's Eve in Old Vienna," I wonder if he was at the same concert as all the rest of us . . . or does he have a vendetta for Keith Clark or the Pacific Symphony, wanting so much to hear only a bad performance so that not even a trickle of anything else can filter through? If the magical whisper from Roberta Peters to Keith Clark, as mentioned in his review of Jan. 2 ("Soloist Roberta Peters Adds Too-Brief Life to Pacific Symphony's New Year's Concert")
NEWS
September 3, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Walter Foy Prude, who helped guide the careers of Isaac Stern, Marian Anderson, Arthur Rubinstein and many other classical artists during a 40-year career in concert management, has died. He was 78. Prude, who lived in Manhattan with his wife, choreographer Agnes de Mille, died of heart failure Monday at St. Vincent's Hospital after a long bout with emphysema. He began his work in the late 1930s in Chicago, overseeing dancer-choreographer Martha Graham's career.
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