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Roberto Alagna

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
On a day's notice, with no rehearsal, Roberto Alagna jumped in for an ailing tenor to sing "Aida" -- 10 months after he stormed off an Italian stage when he was booed in the same role. The incident at Milan's La Scala last December triggered a worldwide uproar. In the next episode, played out Tuesday night at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, Alagna got a standing ovation. The 44-year-old French-born son of a Sicilian bricklayer was filling in for tenor Marco Berti, who fell ill Monday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | Daniel Cariaga
Angela Gheorghiu and her husband, Roberto Alagna, are the international operatic couple of 1998, scoring a triumph at the Metropolitan Opera this spring in Gounod's "Romeo et Juliette," making headlines in a (brief) conflict with Met management over artistic control and, perhaps not coincidentally, achieving very high fees in their joint concerts. The soprano from Romania and the French Italian tenor are undoubtedly talented and indisputably good-looking.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Roberto Alagna is replacing tenor Rolando Villazon in the first two performances of the Metropolitan Opera's revival of Gounod's "Romeo et Juliette" next month. "Mr. Villazon has canceled his engagements for the next two to three months as his doctor had suggested," the singer's manager, Bruce Zemsky, said Tuesday. "He has been advised to have this rest after a very heavy schedule over the last two seasons and looks forward to returning as soon as possible."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES
Manon turns out to be a wonderful role for Gheorghiu, who fully captures the complexity of Massenet's endlessly fascinating character, whether as dreamy innocent or feverish and dying penitent in the final scene. Alagna, her real-life husband, is less vocally resplendent as Des Grieux, although he has soaring high notes whenever he needs them. His greater strength, however, is his deeply persuasive vocal acting as ardent and desperate lover.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2005
Excellent article ("The Voice to Watch," Jan. 23) by Chris Kraul -- someone who really knows his tenors. However, I noticed that he forgot to mention Jose Carreras, who, together with Domingo and Pavarotti, was a member of the Three Tenors franchise; otherwise, the "heir" to their throne, Rolando Villazon, wouldn't have been dubbed "The Fourth Tenor." Kraul also forgot to mention Roberto Alagna, the first candidate ever identified as "The Fourth Tenor" and still the most recorded and identifiable tenor of the present crop.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2003 | Chris Pasles
French tenor Roberto Alagna has received a visa just in time to step in for Placido Domingo in Los Angeles Opera's "Concert of Passion and Poetry," Saturday through Jan. 19 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The appearance will mark the Los Angeles debut of Alagna, who lives in Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Roberto Alagna is replacing tenor Rolando Villazon in the first two performances of the Metropolitan Opera's revival of Gounod's "Romeo et Juliette" next month. "Mr. Villazon has canceled his engagements for the next two to three months as his doctor had suggested," the singer's manager, Bruce Zemsky, said Tuesday. "He has been advised to have this rest after a very heavy schedule over the last two seasons and looks forward to returning as soon as possible."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
On a day's notice, with no rehearsal, Roberto Alagna jumped in for an ailing tenor to sing "Aida" -- 10 months after he stormed off an Italian stage when he was booed in the same role. The incident at Milan's La Scala last December triggered a worldwide uproar. In the next episode, played out Tuesday night at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, Alagna got a standing ovation. The 44-year-old French-born son of a Sicilian bricklayer was filling in for tenor Marco Berti, who fell ill Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2002 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filmed opera performances have the advantage of front-row intimacy coupled with the loss of genuine opera-house acoustics--we get to closely watch singing actors' faces, but we don't get the resonance of voices and orchestra in a large theater. Benoit Jacquot's film of Puccini's "Tosca" goes beyond previous opera films, which for the most part merely documented existing staged performances, though promising wider vistas--outdoor settings, for instance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2005
Excellent article ("The Voice to Watch," Jan. 23) by Chris Kraul -- someone who really knows his tenors. However, I noticed that he forgot to mention Jose Carreras, who, together with Domingo and Pavarotti, was a member of the Three Tenors franchise; otherwise, the "heir" to their throne, Rolando Villazon, wouldn't have been dubbed "The Fourth Tenor." Kraul also forgot to mention Roberto Alagna, the first candidate ever identified as "The Fourth Tenor" and still the most recorded and identifiable tenor of the present crop.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2004 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Some new, glamorous-looking bohemians turned up in Los Angeles Opera's ongoing run of Puccini's "La Boheme" at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Friday night. It was as if the long-suffering landlord Benoit had finally managed to evict some of the residents of that cramped Latin Quarter garret, replacing them with a few who definitely looked capable of paying the rent. And if rent could be calculated in musical currency, yes indeed, soprano Angela Gheorghiu and tenor Roberto Alagna delivered.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2003 | Chris Pasles
French tenor Roberto Alagna has received a visa just in time to step in for Placido Domingo in Los Angeles Opera's "Concert of Passion and Poetry," Saturday through Jan. 19 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The appearance will mark the Los Angeles debut of Alagna, who lives in Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2002 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filmed opera performances have the advantage of front-row intimacy coupled with the loss of genuine opera-house acoustics--we get to closely watch singing actors' faces, but we don't get the resonance of voices and orchestra in a large theater. Benoit Jacquot's film of Puccini's "Tosca" goes beyond previous opera films, which for the most part merely documented existing staged performances, though promising wider vistas--outdoor settings, for instance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES
Manon turns out to be a wonderful role for Gheorghiu, who fully captures the complexity of Massenet's endlessly fascinating character, whether as dreamy innocent or feverish and dying penitent in the final scene. Alagna, her real-life husband, is less vocally resplendent as Des Grieux, although he has soaring high notes whenever he needs them. His greater strength, however, is his deeply persuasive vocal acting as ardent and desperate lover.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1999 | RICHARD S. GINELL
"Il Trittico" is a cunningly constructed, infrequently recorded set of three diverse one-acters, with the Debussy-like scene-setting and brutal conclusion of "Il Tabarro" and poignant pieties of "Suor Angelica" giving way to the sparkling, roguish comedy of "Gianni Schicchi." It is difficult to do equal justice to all of "Trittico's" moods and subjects--and not surprisingly, this new set, the latest installment in Pappano's EMI Puccini cycle, is quite uneven.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2004 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Some new, glamorous-looking bohemians turned up in Los Angeles Opera's ongoing run of Puccini's "La Boheme" at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Friday night. It was as if the long-suffering landlord Benoit had finally managed to evict some of the residents of that cramped Latin Quarter garret, replacing them with a few who definitely looked capable of paying the rent. And if rent could be calculated in musical currency, yes indeed, soprano Angela Gheorghiu and tenor Roberto Alagna delivered.
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