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Roberto Alomar

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1996
The last line of your Oct. 2 editorial about Roberto Alomar's spitting at an umpire ends, "the basic sportsmanship that baseball's overseers have ignored." Does anyone really think that professional athletes, team owners or managers care about sportsmanship? Nonsense! Win, any way you can, but win. Cheat, fake, act out, anything, just win. M. STEPHEN SHELDON Studio City
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SPORTS
January 5, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
On Wednesday, the Hall of Fame voters had their annual say on baseball's steroid era. This is the year the people of the United States enter the debate. People of the United States, that is. Capital P, for plaintiff. It's a perjury doubleheader. On March 22, it's the United States vs. Barry Lamar Bonds. On July 6, it's the U.S. vs. William Roger Clemens. Roberto Alomar and Bert Blyleven were elected to the Hall of Fame on Wednesday. No one else got within 75 votes of election, so perhaps no player gets elected next year, when the strongest first-time candidates include Tim Salmon, Bernie Williams and Vinny Castilla.
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SPORTS
March 26, 1988 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
What began so wondrously last month as it stretched its huge potential across the middle of a baseball diamond ended Friday, curled up in the balm-soaked corner of a trainer's room. It ended with a 20-year-old and a towel and tears, uncontrollable tears, punctuated by cries of, "No, no." For the first time all spring, Roberto Alomar has acted his age.
SPORTS
March 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
Roberto Alomar left the park after playing only one inning Friday night and the Tampa Bay Devil Rays said they would have an announcement concerning his future today, leading to speculation that the 12-time All-Star was planning to retire. Alomar made two errors at second base and struck out looking in his only at-bat during a 5-4 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays, his first game since March 10 because of a back sprain.
SPORTS
June 3, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two European television commentators are discussing Mary Pierce and her relationship with France, her adopted country, during her third-round victory Friday against Virginie Razzano, a 17-year-old French native who still wears braces. "You have to know her to understand her," said one commentator. Advantage, Pierce. "After all, you can't be liked by everybody," said the other. Disadvantage, Pierce. The fans here at the French Open are still trying to understand Pierce, let alone know her.
SPORTS
April 22, 1988 | JERRY CROWE, Times Staff Writer
Roberto Alomar finally made it to the major leagues this week--about 2 1/2 weeks later than the most highly regarded prospect in the San Diego Padres' organization was expected to arrive. Alomar, youngest son of Padre coach and former Angel second baseman Sandy Alomar, led Padre infielders in spring training with a .360 batting average and startled veterans and most of the coaching staff with his defensive ability at second base.
SPORTS
October 5, 1997 | DAVID GINSBURG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With a handshake on the field at Camden Yards last April, umpire John Hirschbeck and Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar tried to end an ugly disagreement that profoundly affected both men and their sport. Yet it has become evident that the events of last Sept. 27, when Hirschbeck accepted the apology anyway, eager to put it all behind him. In their next public meeting, at Camden Yards on April 22, the men shook hands.
SPORTS
June 26, 1990 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Garry Templeton felt a sharp pain, as if someone stabbed him in the gut Monday afternoon, as the words tumbled out of Padre Manager Jack McKeon's mouth. McKeon kept talking, but Templeton didn't hear a thing, fighting to regain his senses. Everything suddenly had become a blur. His entire 14-year career began flashing through his mind: He thought about his days with the St. Louis Cardinals . . . his two All-Star appearances . . . the three years he batted over .300 . . .
SPORTS
February 8, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Second baseman Roberto Alomar and the Toronto Blue Jays agreed to an $14-million, three-year contract.
SPORTS
June 28, 1999 | Associated Press
Cleveland's Roberto Alomar left Sunday's game at Kansas City early after being hit on his left elbow by a pitch from Tim Byrdak in the seventh. He stayed in and scored but did not take the field in the bottom of the seventh. Alomar has a bruise and the injury does not appear serious. * The Kansas City Royals sent pitcher Chris Fussell to triple-A Omaha and recalled pitcher Alvin Morman. . . .
SPORTS
May 4, 2003 | Johnette Howard, Newsday
The Mets can go ahead and fire General Manager Steve Phillips, who was lucky to outlast Bobby Valentine this long. They can hurry 19-year-old prospect Jose Reyes up to the big leagues, as if a kid shortstop who's hitting .247 in Triple-A can spark the team when potential Hall of Famers Mike Piazza and Tom Glavine cannot.
SPORTS
April 15, 2002 | From Associated Press
Roberto Alomar borrowed one of Mike Piazza's bats and suddenly became a slugger too. Alomar homered twice and singled to set up Piazza's go-ahead single in the sixth inning, leading the New York Mets over the Montreal Expos, 6-4, Sunday. Alomar began the afternoon batting .170 with one home run since moving to the Mets after 11 years in the American League. The perennial All-Star hoped to change his luck by trying out a Piazza bat he sampled in spring training. "He gave it to me five days ago.
SPORTS
July 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
Roberto Alomar has played in 11 All-Star games. He has nine Gold Gloves, two World Series rings and more than 2,300 hits. But until Tuesday night, a five-hit game was nowhere on his resume. Alomar's five-for-five performance overshadowed Manny Ramirez's return to Cleveland, helping Jake Westbrook and the Cleveland Indians to a 9-1 rout of the Boston Red Sox. "I had no idea," Alomar said. "I got lucky. I guess I'm seeing the ball real well." Alomar, leading the American League with a .
SPORTS
June 3, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two European television commentators are discussing Mary Pierce and her relationship with France, her adopted country, during her third-round victory Friday against Virginie Razzano, a 17-year-old French native who still wears braces. "You have to know her to understand her," said one commentator. Advantage, Pierce. "After all, you can't be liked by everybody," said the other. Disadvantage, Pierce. The fans here at the French Open are still trying to understand Pierce, let alone know her.
SPORTS
October 6, 1999 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the television camera zooms in on Roberto Alomar in the Cleveland Indian dugout, it rarely catches the star second baseman laughing, smiling or joking. Alomar is almost always sitting straight up, alert, his head still and eyes wide open, wearing a look that is intense yet serene, like that of a predator about to pounce on easy prey. "He's like an alligator," Indian shortstop Omar Vizquel said. "He's a real quiet guy who doesn't say much. He just sits there and watches everything.
SPORTS
September 4, 1999 | From Associated Press
Roberto Alomar reminded the Baltimore Orioles and their fans what they're missing. Alomar marked his return to Baltimore in spectacular fashion Friday night, hitting his career-high 23rd homer and driving in five runs to lead the Cleveland Indians to a 7-6 victory over the Orioles. Manny Ramirez hit his 37th home run for the Indians, who won their fifth in a row and improved to 7-0 against Baltimore this season.
SPORTS
April 10, 1989 | Associated Press
The San Diego Padres pulled off their sixth triple play in club history and their first since July 31, 1983, in the eighth inning Sunday against Houston. With Kevin Bass on second and Greg Gross on first, Ken Caminiti hit a ground ball to third baseman Luis Salazar, who threw to Roberto Alomar at second, forcing Gross. Alomar then threw to Jack Clark at first to get Caminiti. Bass broke for home, appeared to hestitate, and Clark threw to catcher Mark Parent, who tagged out Bass.
SPORTS
June 28, 1999 | Associated Press
Cleveland's Roberto Alomar left Sunday's game at Kansas City early after being hit on his left elbow by a pitch from Tim Byrdak in the seventh. He stayed in and scored but did not take the field in the bottom of the seventh. Alomar has a bruise and the injury does not appear serious. * The Kansas City Royals sent pitcher Chris Fussell to triple-A Omaha and recalled pitcher Alvin Morman. . . .
SPORTS
June 27, 1999 | TOM WITHERS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As Roberto Alomar ran back to the Indians' dugout, many fans realized they had seen an extraordinary play, one worth a standing ovation. Racing into short center field with his back to the plate, Alomar twisted and snared a blooper hit over his head, turning an apparent single into just another out. The cheers came from the same fans who turned their backs on Alomar in the 1996 playoffs. He was a villain then, the Baltimore second baseman who spit in umpire John Hirschbeck's face.
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