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Roberto Armijo

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January 4, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Col. Roberto Armijo, the officer chosen to head a new Panamanian military cleansed of the corruption and brutality that identified the army headed by Noriega, was forced to resign Wednesday because of "irregularities in his personal finances." President Guillermo Endara made the announcement of Armijo's resignation, which marks his new government's first crisis, without elaboration.
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NEWS
January 4, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Col. Roberto Armijo, the officer chosen to head a new Panamanian military cleansed of the corruption and brutality that identified the army headed by Noriega, was forced to resign Wednesday because of "irregularities in his personal finances." President Guillermo Endara made the announcement of Armijo's resignation, which marks his new government's first crisis, without elaboration.
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NEWS
January 7, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Combing through the ruins of Manuel A. Noriega's dictatorship, Panamanian investigators have prepared more than 300 cases of corruption against former officials accused of bleeding the treasury through padded payrolls, illegal procurements and other embezzlement schemes.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega was handed over to U.S. authorities in Panama on Wednesday night to face drug charges in American courts, the White House announced. The circumstances of the surrender were not immediately clear. Noriega had sought refuge in the Vatican embassy in Panama City on Christmas Eve. President Bush, in a nationally televised appearance from the White House, said that Noriega "turned himself in to U.S.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last organized military support for deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega collapsed Saturday, and Panama's new U.S.-approved leaders began efforts to form and run an actual government. According to European diplomats involved in the negotiations, the garrisons at five important provincial capitals have pledged their allegiance to the constitution and the new government sworn in after thousands of American troops invaded early Wednesday.
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