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Roberto Baggio

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SPORTS
June 16, 1994 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Roberto Baggio's value as a soccer player enough to justify a two-day riot? It's the kind of philosophical question that Baggio the man would enjoy turning over. But at the moment, Baggio, Europe's best soccer player, is repulsed by the memories of what he, indirectly, wrought. Baggio is one of the world's most charismatic and intriguing players, and also one of the most misunderstood.
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SPORTS
December 30, 2003 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
The "Divine Ponytail" has finally decided to hang it up. No, not Julie Foudy, Roberto Baggio. World and European player of the year in 1993 and Italy's standout player at the 1994 World Cup in the United States, Baggio is 36, and 16 seasons in Serie A with such leading clubs as Inter Milan, Juventus and AC Milan, as well as with Bologna, Fiorentina and, for the last four seasons, Brescia, have taken their toll. "The idea of retiring is uppermost in my mind at the moment and I think that that is what will definitely happen," Baggio told the Brescia television station Teletutto.
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SPORTS
July 15, 1994 | GIGI GARANZINI, La Voce in Milan
Under a picture of a smiling Baggio with a halo of soccer balls and the headline: "St. Baggio from N.Y.": "Think of the exact opposite of the two preceding games. . . . That is how Italy beat Bulgaria and qualified for the finals in Los Angeles. Then it was the team who dragged Roberto Baggio forward; today it was Roberto Baggio who resolved the match and dragged the team to the finals before succumbing to a wrenched muscle in the left thigh."
SPORTS
June 24, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filippo Inzaghi's pass had been so perfect and so generous, Roberto Baggio felt compelled to reward him after Baggio scored what would hold up as the decisive goal in Italy's 2-1 victory over Austria on Tuesday at the Stade de France. A standard hug wasn't enough, not for setting up the goal that enabled Italy to clinch first place in Group B. So Baggio pointed to his teammate, smiled, and lowered his shoulders so Inzaghi could climb aboard for a brief but happy piggyback ride.
SPORTS
December 27, 1993
Roberto Baggio, the top player on the Italian team that finished first in its World Cup qualifying group, was voted European player of year. Baggio, the first Italian to win the award since Paolo Rossi in 1982, received 142 points in voting conducted by France Football magazine. Last week, Baggio was voted FIFA world player of the year by national team coaches. Baggio, 26, has nine goals in the Italian League this season for Juventus of Turin, the defending UEFA Cup champion.
SPORTS
July 10, 1994 | GRAHAME L. JONES
For Italy, it was yet another journey to the edge of the precipice and yet another last-minute escape. And, just as it had been against Nigeria four days earlier, it was Roberto Baggio who rode to the rescue. A goal by the ponytailed Juventus star in the 88th minute earned the Italians a deserved, albeit belabored, 2-1 victory over Spain on Saturday and a berth in the World Cup semifinals.
SPORTS
July 17, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heartbeat of a nation audible in his upper right leg, Roberto Baggio hobbled off a Loyola Marymount soccer field Saturday morning hoping to comfort his countrymen with an old Italian saying. "Hope is the last thing to die," he said. Across town in Fullerton, the Brazilians smiled, strutted and hinted of a performance inspired by another traditional saying. "Outta our way!"
SPORTS
June 24, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filippo Inzaghi's pass had been so perfect and so generous, Roberto Baggio felt compelled to reward him after Baggio scored what would hold up as the decisive goal in Italy's 2-1 victory over Austria on Tuesday at the Stade de France. A standard hug wasn't enough, not for setting up the goal that enabled Italy to clinch first place in Group B. So Baggio pointed to his teammate, smiled, and lowered his shoulders so Inzaghi could climb aboard for a brief but happy piggyback ride.
SPORTS
July 8, 1994 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clemens Westerhof, the affable Dutchman who coaches Nigeria's national soccer team, will catch the rest of the World Cup in Florida on vacation with his family. The proximate cause of Westerhof's overnight transformation from coach to tourist was plain when he left Foxboro Stadium the other day. "We allowed Baggio free for five meters, and that was the problem," Westerhof said. Yes indeed.
SPORTS
July 17, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heartbeat of a nation audible in his upper right leg, Roberto Baggio hobbled off a Loyola Marymount soccer field Saturday morning hoping to comfort his countrymen with an old Italian saying. "Hope is the last thing to die," he said. Across town in Fullerton, the Brazilians smiled, strutted and hinted of a performance inspired by another traditional saying. "Outta our way!"
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As in all epochal battles, mythical or otherwise, there has to be a hero and there has to be a villain. But which is which? That's the difficulty facing neutral observers of today's World Cup final between Italy and Brazil at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. For the first time in history, two three-time winners of the planet's most coveted sports trophy are squaring off in the championship match. But which team should you support? Do you take Italy, which won the World Cup in 1934, 1938 and 1982, because of its courage in the face of adversity?
SPORTS
July 16, 1994 | JANET STOBART, Times Rome Bureau
While Roberto Baggio was busy leading his team to triumph, his villa in northern Italy was visited by burglars. They were chased off by his sister's German shepherd. "They must have been foreign burglars," was the comment of a television commentator Wednesday night. "All the Italian burglars would have been watching the game."
SPORTS
July 14, 1994 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
Italy beat Bulgaria, 2-1, in the semifinals of World Cup '94 before a crowd of 77,094 Wednesday at Giants Stadium in the Meadowlands. The stars of the game were Demetrio Albertini and Pierluigi Casiraghi for Italy and Trifon Ivanov and Yordan Letchkov for Bulgaria. What about Roberto Baggio and Hristo Stoitchkov? Forget them. You can read 25 stories and 25,000 words about those two today. Elsewhere. They are the superstars.
SPORTS
July 13, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Watch them when they score. Watch their faces. Everyone else stares in wonderment at the sky or into the stands, the better to understand his achievement and remember his glory. Not these guys. They close their eyes. They need look at nothing, because they have seen it all before. They require no understanding, as if they have known their task since birth. They are heroes. This is their time. Roberto Baggio of Italy. Hristo Stoitchkov of Bulgaria. Romario of Brazil.
SPORTS
July 10, 1994 | GRAHAME L. JONES
For Italy, it was yet another journey to the edge of the precipice and yet another last-minute escape. And, just as it had been against Nigeria four days earlier, it was Roberto Baggio who rode to the rescue. A goal by the ponytailed Juventus star in the 88th minute earned the Italians a deserved, albeit belabored, 2-1 victory over Spain on Saturday and a berth in the World Cup semifinals.
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