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Roberto Bolano

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
To be married to a writer can be a peculiar kind of torture. Carolina Lopez saw her husband, the late Chilean novelist and poet Roberto Bolaño, take up with another woman for the final years of his life. (He died in 2003.) Lopez deserves credit for helping Bolaño become the first dead superstar of 21st century literature. Next month, New Directions will release Bolaño's 19th book in English, “The Unknown University,” a collection of poetry assembled from the archives Lopez oversees.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
As busy as Roberto Bolaño's afterlife has been - he's published 19 books in English since his death in 2003 - his time on Earth was even busier. Bolaño, who died at age 50, had a life that was rooted in three continents. He was born in Chile, the son of a boxer; he came of age in Mexico City and became a poet there; and he later moved to Barcelona, where he wrote the works that would make him a celebrated novelist. Best known to U.S. readers for two novels - "The Savage Detectives," first published in Spanish in 1998, and the posthumous "2666" - in the years since his death Bolaño has earned a global following as a prose stylist with rampant narrative ambition.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
Roberto Bolaño has made quite a name for himself in the United States over the past decade. Two New York houses have published 18 of his books in English - and a 19th is due out later this year. He has become, arguably, the contemporary Latin American writer most revered by the literati of North America. And all this fame has come to him as a dead man - he succumbed to congenital liver disease in 2003. This week, the departed Chilean-born novelist and poet was celebrated in an event at the Los Angeles Public Library's ALOUD series.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Roberto Bolano did not live to see his book "2666" become an American bestseller. Nor did he make it to the popularization of e-books -- he died 10 years ago, on May 15, 2003. On Tuesday, "2666" saw its debut as an e-book . The electronic format is a welcome one -- in print, it's a hefty 898 pages. When the book was published in 2008, Ben Ehrenreich reviewed the "giant" book for The Times, finding it "strange and marvelous and impossibly funny, bursting with melancholy and horror.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Michael Singer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Return Stories Roberto Bolaño Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews New Directions: 208 pp., $23.95 Roberto Bolaño haunts his English-speaking readership almost twice yearly. Translations of at least 10 books have appeared since his death of liver failure at age 50 in 2003. Many carry dust-jacket claims of being essential to the Bolaño canon — either as the weighty summa of his accomplishment ("2666") or as a skeleton key that opens up the rest of his works ("Nazi Literature in the Americas")
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Roberto Bolano did not live to see his book "2666" become an American bestseller. Nor did he make it to the popularization of e-books -- he died 10 years ago, on May 15, 2003. On Tuesday, "2666" saw its debut as an e-book . The electronic format is a welcome one -- in print, it's a hefty 898 pages. When the book was published in 2008, Ben Ehrenreich reviewed the "giant" book for The Times, finding it "strange and marvelous and impossibly funny, bursting with melancholy and horror.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
As busy as Roberto Bolaño's afterlife has been - he's published 19 books in English since his death in 2003 - his time on Earth was even busier. Bolaño, who died at age 50, had a life that was rooted in three continents. He was born in Chile, the son of a boxer; he came of age in Mexico City and became a poet there; and he later moved to Barcelona, where he wrote the works that would make him a celebrated novelist. Best known to U.S. readers for two novels - "The Savage Detectives," first published in Spanish in 1998, and the posthumous "2666" - in the years since his death Bolaño has earned a global following as a prose stylist with rampant narrative ambition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Roberto Bolano, 50, a high school dropout who became one of Chile's most respected writers, died Tuesday of liver disease. Bolano, who had lived in Spain since 1977, died in a Barcelona hospital as he awaited a transplant, said local officials in Blanes, the Spanish town where he lived. Bolano lived in Mexico in the late 1960s. In 1972, he returned to Chile, but he was forced to flee when Gen. Augusto Pinochet seized power the following year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2009 | Associated Press
The late Roberto Bolano's "2666" received the fiction prize from the National Book Critics Circle. Other winners Thursday night included Ariel Sabar's "My Father's Paradise" for autobiography, Dexter Filkins' "The Forever War" for general nonfiction and Patrick French's "The World Is What It Is: The Authorized Biography of V.S. Naipaul" for biography. For the first time in the awards' 35-year history, two winners were named for one category: August Kleinzahler's "Sleeping It Off in Rapid City" and Juan Felipe Herrera's "Half of the World in Light: New and Selected Poems" shared the poetry prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2007
SOME critics have said that Kurt Vonnegut's writing was not literature because it was so accessible. In Sunday's Calendar, there was an article about Roberto Bolano, who has been receiving a lot of attention lately ["Way Beyond Magical Realism," April 15]. I have read most of Vonnegut's novels and enjoyed the writing and his messages. I tried to read "The Savage Detectives" and found it to be completely unreadable, thoroughly pretentious and incomprehensible. What is the point of great writing if we can't slog through it?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
To be married to a writer can be a peculiar kind of torture. Carolina Lopez saw her husband, the late Chilean novelist and poet Roberto Bolaño, take up with another woman for the final years of his life. (He died in 2003.) Lopez deserves credit for helping Bolaño become the first dead superstar of 21st century literature. Next month, New Directions will release Bolaño's 19th book in English, “The Unknown University,” a collection of poetry assembled from the archives Lopez oversees.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
Roberto Bolaño has made quite a name for himself in the United States over the past decade. Two New York houses have published 18 of his books in English - and a 19th is due out later this year. He has become, arguably, the contemporary Latin American writer most revered by the literati of North America. And all this fame has come to him as a dead man - he succumbed to congenital liver disease in 2003. This week, the departed Chilean-born novelist and poet was celebrated in an event at the Los Angeles Public Library's ALOUD series.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Jacob Silverman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Woes of the True Policeman A Novel Roberto Bolaño, translated from Spanish by Natasha Wimmer Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 256 pp., $25 An early death isn't the end for a writer. Like a special dispensation from the pope, it can be one path to literary canonization, as well as to bestsellerdom. David Foster Wallace and Roberto Bolaño are the preeminent recent examples of this paradigm, though anyone from John Kennedy Toole to Sylvia Plath may also apply. But soon the fans want more, the heirs require succor, and so the posthumous editions begin to appear.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Michael Singer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Return Stories Roberto Bolaño Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews New Directions: 208 pp., $23.95 Roberto Bolaño haunts his English-speaking readership almost twice yearly. Translations of at least 10 books have appeared since his death of liver failure at age 50 in 2003. Many carry dust-jacket claims of being essential to the Bolaño canon — either as the weighty summa of his accomplishment ("2666") or as a skeleton key that opens up the rest of his works ("Nazi Literature in the Americas")
SPORTS
January 22, 2010 | By Mike Bresnahan
There was a reason Phil Jackson could be seen balancing a large stack of books earlier this week at a Los Angeles bookstore. The Lakers coach bought books for each of his players and distributed them before their eight-game trip, part of an annual ritual before a Jackson-coached team begins a long winter trip. Kobe Bryant , who rolls his eyes whenever Jackson gives him a book, probably won't be perusing what Jackson handed him: "Montana 1948," a Larry Watson novel about a middle-class Montana family torn apart by a scandal in the late 1940s.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
Roberto Bolaño: The Last Interview And Other Conversations Introduced by Marcela Valdes Melville House: 124 pp., $14.95 paper Roberto Bolaño is your wake-up call; the alarm that goes off whether or not you intended to set it. In many ways, this book of interviews, including the last one that ran in Playboy in 2003 before he died, at age 50, of liver failure, is more fun to read than his novels: His fictions crush that little...
SPORTS
January 22, 2010 | By Mike Bresnahan
There was a reason Phil Jackson could be seen balancing a large stack of books earlier this week at a Los Angeles bookstore. The Lakers coach bought books for each of his players and distributed them before their eight-game trip, part of an annual ritual before a Jackson-coached team begins a long winter trip. Kobe Bryant , who rolls his eyes whenever Jackson gives him a book, probably won't be perusing what Jackson handed him: "Montana 1948," a Larry Watson novel about a middle-class Montana family torn apart by a scandal in the late 1940s.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
The fifth annual Tournament of Books at the online magazine the Morning News -- a sort of bookish March Madness -- has begun, and it's had its share of upsets. In the second matchup last week, the literary heavyweight "Netherland" by Joseph O'Neill fell to "A Partisan's Daughter" by Louis De Bernieres. Then, "Harry, Revised" -- the debut novel from L.A. author Mark Sarvas, who does the Elegant Variation litblog -- beat the Man Booker Prize-winning book "The White Tiger" by Aravind Adiga.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
The fifth annual Tournament of Books at the online magazine the Morning News -- a sort of bookish March Madness -- has begun, and it's had its share of upsets. In the second matchup last week, the literary heavyweight "Netherland" by Joseph O'Neill fell to "A Partisan's Daughter" by Louis De Bernieres. Then, "Harry, Revised" -- the debut novel from L.A. author Mark Sarvas, who does the Elegant Variation litblog -- beat the Man Booker Prize-winning book "The White Tiger" by Aravind Adiga.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2009 | Associated Press
The late Roberto Bolano's "2666" received the fiction prize from the National Book Critics Circle. Other winners Thursday night included Ariel Sabar's "My Father's Paradise" for autobiography, Dexter Filkins' "The Forever War" for general nonfiction and Patrick French's "The World Is What It Is: The Authorized Biography of V.S. Naipaul" for biography. For the first time in the awards' 35-year history, two winners were named for one category: August Kleinzahler's "Sleeping It Off in Rapid City" and Juan Felipe Herrera's "Half of the World in Light: New and Selected Poems" shared the poetry prize.
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