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Roberto C Goizueta

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BUSINESS
October 14, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Coca-Cola Co. Chairman Roberto C. Goizueta was in critical condition Monday with a throat infection related to recent treatments for lung cancer. The 65-year-old Goizueta, who was in intensive care at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, will miss a board meeting Thursday for the first time since he became chairman of the soft drink giant 16 years ago. "He's seriously ill," said Randy Donaldson, a Coca-Cola spokesman. "He did not feel like he would be there." Goizueta was hospitalized Sept.
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NEWS
October 19, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and JAMES F. PELTZ and J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Roberto C. Goizueta, an aristocratic and unpretentious Cuban immigrant whose 16-year leadership of Coca-Cola Co. transformed the once-floundering soda maker into one of the world's richest corporate franchises--and made himself a billionaire in the process--died Saturday of complications related to lung cancer. He was 65. Goizueta, a heavy smoker, died less than two months after doctors found a malignant tumor on his right lung.
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NEWS
October 19, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and JAMES F. PELTZ and J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Roberto C. Goizueta, an aristocratic and unpretentious Cuban immigrant whose 16-year leadership of Coca-Cola Co. transformed the once-floundering soda maker into one of the world's richest corporate franchises--and made himself a billionaire in the process--died Saturday of complications related to lung cancer. He was 65. Goizueta, a heavy smoker, died less than two months after doctors found a malignant tumor on his right lung.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Coca-Cola Co. Chairman Roberto C. Goizueta was in critical condition Monday with a throat infection related to recent treatments for lung cancer. The 65-year-old Goizueta, who was in intensive care at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, will miss a board meeting Thursday for the first time since he became chairman of the soft drink giant 16 years ago. "He's seriously ill," said Randy Donaldson, a Coca-Cola spokesman. "He did not feel like he would be there." Goizueta was hospitalized Sept.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few corporate stars earn more than America's top sports and entertainment figures, but Coca-Cola Co. Chairman Roberto C. Goizueta makes Chicago Cubs' $7-million infielder Ryne Sandberg look underpaid. Coke's 1991 proxy statement discloses that Goizueta received 1 million shares of company stock last year worth about $81 million at today's prices. In addition, he earned base salary, bonuses and incentive deals worth about $3.14 million.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
What does it tell you that Coca-Cola Co. is going to buy up 40 million of its own shares in the next three years at a cost, based on today's prices, of $1.8 billion? One thing it tells you is that Coca-Cola stock has a strong buyer behind it for the next couple of years. That doesn't necessarily mean the stock will go up, but it could put a cushion under any fall. Also, it gives you some idea of what a great business soft drinks are. Coke Chairman Roberto C.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Ever since Coca-Cola acquired Columbia Pictures Industries five years ago, Hollywood has debated whether the Atlanta soft-drink company had the stamina--or the instincts--for show business. Coca-Cola underscored its seriousness by investing in four smaller movie companies and buying two leading suppliers of television programs, but some competitors ridiculed Coca-Cola for taking a "multiflavored" approach, and asked just where Coca-Cola intended to go. This week, Coca-Cola provided some answers.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Coca-Cola Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Roberto Goizueta was hospitalized for a small malignant lung tumor, the company said Monday. Goizueta, 65, felt unusually tired after a recent business trip to Europe and checked into Emory University hospital in Atlanta for tests that revealed the tumor, the company said. Goizueta is expected to receive radiation treatment and will be back at his desk next week, the company said.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Top Salary at Coca-Cola: Coca-Cola Co. said its pay package for Chairman Roberto Goizueta in 1992 totaled more than $15.3 million in salary, bonuses, incentive payouts and stock-option profits. The disclosure came in the soft-drink giant's annual shareholder proxy, which also said the top executive held outright or restricted ownership of more than 9.38 million shares of Coca-Cola stock worth more than $400 million at current prices.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
Coca-Cola Co. awarded Chairman and Chief Executive Roberto Goizueta 1 million stock options currently valued at $22.8 million and boosted his pay by 10% last year. According to the beverage company's proxy statement, the options can be exercised at $57.5625 a share at any time during the next 10 years. The value of the options is based on the company's closing price Friday of $80.50 a share, down 75 cents. The options are the first awarded to Goizueta since it granted him $63.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Coca-Cola Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Roberto Goizueta was hospitalized for a small malignant lung tumor, the company said Monday. Goizueta, 65, felt unusually tired after a recent business trip to Europe and checked into Emory University hospital in Atlanta for tests that revealed the tumor, the company said. Goizueta is expected to receive radiation treatment and will be back at his desk next week, the company said.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
Coca-Cola Co. awarded Chairman and Chief Executive Roberto Goizueta 1 million stock options currently valued at $22.8 million and boosted his pay by 10% last year. According to the beverage company's proxy statement, the options can be exercised at $57.5625 a share at any time during the next 10 years. The value of the options is based on the company's closing price Friday of $80.50 a share, down 75 cents. The options are the first awarded to Goizueta since it granted him $63.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Top Salary at Coca-Cola: Coca-Cola Co. said its pay package for Chairman Roberto Goizueta in 1992 totaled more than $15.3 million in salary, bonuses, incentive payouts and stock-option profits. The disclosure came in the soft-drink giant's annual shareholder proxy, which also said the top executive held outright or restricted ownership of more than 9.38 million shares of Coca-Cola stock worth more than $400 million at current prices.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few corporate stars earn more than America's top sports and entertainment figures, but Coca-Cola Co. Chairman Roberto C. Goizueta makes Chicago Cubs' $7-million infielder Ryne Sandberg look underpaid. Coke's 1991 proxy statement discloses that Goizueta received 1 million shares of company stock last year worth about $81 million at today's prices. In addition, he earned base salary, bonuses and incentive deals worth about $3.14 million.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Ever since Coca-Cola acquired Columbia Pictures Industries five years ago, Hollywood has debated whether the Atlanta soft-drink company had the stamina--or the instincts--for show business. Coca-Cola underscored its seriousness by investing in four smaller movie companies and buying two leading suppliers of television programs, but some competitors ridiculed Coca-Cola for taking a "multiflavored" approach, and asked just where Coca-Cola intended to go. This week, Coca-Cola provided some answers.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
What does it tell you that Coca-Cola Co. is going to buy up 40 million of its own shares in the next three years at a cost, based on today's prices, of $1.8 billion? One thing it tells you is that Coca-Cola stock has a strong buyer behind it for the next couple of years. That doesn't necessarily mean the stock will go up, but it could put a cushion under any fall. Also, it gives you some idea of what a great business soft drinks are. Coke Chairman Roberto C.
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