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Roberto Ferrey

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August 29, 1989 | From Reuters
Resistance leader Roberto Ferrey returned home to Nicaragua on Monday after six years in exile and pledged to fight to improve conditions for democracy in the period leading up to next February's elections. Ferrey told reporters that his return did not necessarily mean that he is quitting as a Contra director, a position he only recently assumed, or that he had dropped the idea of a military solution in Nicaragua.
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NEWS
August 29, 1989 | From Reuters
Resistance leader Roberto Ferrey returned home to Nicaragua on Monday after six years in exile and pledged to fight to improve conditions for democracy in the period leading up to next February's elections. Ferrey told reporters that his return did not necessarily mean that he is quitting as a Contra director, a position he only recently assumed, or that he had dropped the idea of a military solution in Nicaragua.
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NEWS
June 21, 1988
Nicaragua's rebels rejected a new Sandinista government proposal to reopen peace talks, charging that the offer was linked to Washington's consideration of military aid for the Contras. "Every time the Americans talk of military aid, they (the Sandinistas) talk of negotiation," Contra leader Roberto Ferrey said in Costa Rica. The Reagan Administration, which has supported the rebels since 1981, is considering whether to ask Congress for renewed military aid.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | Associated Press
U.S.-backed rebels reversed their position and accepted Managua as the site of a third round of peace talks with the government, a rebel spokesman said today. Roberto Ferrey, secretary of the Nicaraguan Resistance directorate, said by telephone from Costa Rica that the rebel delegation, headed by Alfredo Cesar, will arrive in Managua this evening.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | From Reuters
A political leader of the U.S.-backed Contras announced he will return to Nicaragua in the next few days, the official Sandinista newspaper Barricada said Friday. Roberto Ferrey made the announcement in letters to Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo and to the secretary general of the Organization of American States, Joao Baena Soares, it said. General elections are scheduled in Nicaragua on Feb. 25, 1990.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Faced with two rival armistice proposals from the U.S.-backed Contras, President Daniel Ortega on Saturday ruled out talking with either rebel faction but said he is preparing his own peace offer for direct negotiations with the United States. In a year-end speech, Ortega boasted that the Sandinista revolution, midway through its 10th year, had survived eight years of hostility from the Reagan Administration.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Nicaraguan government and Contra negotiators met Monday for the first time in more than three months but failed to agree on a site for new peace talks. The Sandinista government offered to resume the talks in Managua, the Nicaraguan capital, where negotiations collapsed June 9. But the U.S.-backed rebels insisted on a neutral site--in the Dominican Republic, Costa Rica or Guatemala--to give their negotiators an equal footing.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a defiant shout of "No!" an elite unit of anti-Sandinista rebels Wednesday refused to give up its weapons even though the Sandinista government they fought to overthrow had already peacefully surrendered control of Nicaragua's government. Under an accord signed April 18, the 9,000-strong Contra army was to begin disarming on Wednesday, with the first 500-member unit turning over its weapons at 3 p.m., three hours after Violeta Barrios de Chamorro took the oath as Nicaragua's new president.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contra leaders pledged Saturday to begin the stalled process of disarming their forces this week in return for the permanent demilitarization of a remote corner of Nicaragua where former guerrillas will settle as pioneer farmers with government aid. The accord, announced at 1 a.m. after 15 hours of talks, was the first step by President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's 10-day-old administration to demilitarize Nicaragua after eight years of war between the U.S.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Death summoned Enrique Bermudez by telephone. The call for the former top Contra commander came last Saturday to his sister's house, his landing pad in the postwar Nicaragua he had known as a civilian for just four months. He was going to stay home that evening, but the call changed his plans. As he left, Bermudez told the maid "a friend" had phoned to say that U.S. Ambassador Harry Shlaudemann wanted to meet him at the Intercontinental Hotel.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
In this mountain valley near the Nicaraguan border, thousands of idled Contra foot soldiers are training intensely for a war that may never be fully revived. Having withdrawn all but a token guerrilla force to camps in Honduras, the rebel movement is staring at many signs of defeat. Its civilian support network is collapsing across rural Nicaragua. Its U.S.-supplied ammunition is running low. Feuding among its leaders is running high.
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