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Roberto Gil De Montes

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September 15, 1991 | MAX BENAVIDEZ, Max Benavidez is a writer and critic
In describing himself and his fellow countrymen, Mexican poet Octavio Paz once observed that they are all the sons and daughters of bitches. The Spaniard raped the Indian, he said, and the Mexican was conceived. This involuntary and brutal beginning has haunted all Mexicans for 500 years. Wherever they live, whatever their social class, they are metaphorical bastards in search of an identity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Roberto Gil de Montes is truly a citizen of the world. The 62-year-old artist -- whose first solo show in nearly 10 years opens at Bergamot Station's Lora Schlesinger Gallery on Saturday -- was born in Guadalajara, Mexico, and as a teenager, his family lived in East Los Angeles. He's spent the last nine years living in the small beach town of Nayarit and in Echo Park, where he still keeps a home, while also traveling extensively throughout India and Europe for inspiration, he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Roberto Gil de Montes is truly a citizen of the world. The 62-year-old artist -- whose first solo show in nearly 10 years opens at Bergamot Station's Lora Schlesinger Gallery on Saturday -- was born in Guadalajara, Mexico, and as a teenager, his family lived in East Los Angeles. He's spent the last nine years living in the small beach town of Nayarit and in Echo Park, where he still keeps a home, while also traveling extensively throughout India and Europe for inspiration, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1991 | MAX BENAVIDEZ, Max Benavidez is a writer and critic
In describing himself and his fellow countrymen, Mexican poet Octavio Paz once observed that they are all the sons and daughters of bitches. The Spaniard raped the Indian, he said, and the Mexican was conceived. This involuntary and brutal beginning has haunted all Mexicans for 500 years. Wherever they live, whatever their social class, they are metaphorical bastards in search of an identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
For the second consecutive year, local Latino artists will auction off their works to raise money for a South Central Los Angeles health center. The Second Annual Hispanic Heritage Art Auction will benefit the South Central Family Health Center, which serves a growing Latino community in the area. This year's auction will be held next Sunday9) from 1-5 p.m. at the Laband Gallery on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA
Actors and artists. Poets and playwrights. Dancers and divas. Together they raised the banner--and the roof--for Latino gay pride at Viva's 10th anniversary at the El Rey Theatre. Almost 250 members and supporters of Viva, a lesbian and gay Latino artists association, turned out recently for a party that featured dancing, a fashion show by the Klub Kids and singing by Ana Gazzola and Sonia Santos. The Fabulous Wonder Twins, Carlos and Louis--in cobalt-blue, butterfly-adorned dos--were there.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991
Me da pena (y coraje) . It hurts and angers me. In Max Benavidez's "The Labyrinth of the North" (Sept. 15), Mexican artist Roberto Gil de Montes arrogantly and condescendingly proclaims: "I certainly have nothing against Chicanos. After all, we gave birth to them. They come from what we are. . . . When they did try to be like me, it seemed ridiculous. So how could I identify with them? They were trying to become what I already was." But in the next breath, he admits to ripping off Eastside graffiti motifs for his own work.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Scale isn't all with Roberto Gil de Montes, but it's woefully important in his current show of big and little paintings. More often than not, the small works rattle and shiver with a magical charge, while large ones make him look like one more Neo-Expressionist.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | NANCY ZUBIRI
The artworks of Mexican-born artist Roberto Gil de Montes and Chilean-born painter Francisco Letelier are seen by thousands daily in two of the new Red Line subway stations. Now they are among the works to be seen in free guided tours to be conducted in Spanish. On March 19 and 26 the tours start at 11 a.m. On March 20 and 27 they are offered at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Reservations are required. Call (213) 244-6810.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three teams of artists and one individual artist received commissions Monday for four public art projects totaling about $1.4 million. The projects will be erected on three sites at Los Angeles' Union Station Gateway Center, a three-year construction site for a $320-million transit center planned for the Union Station area.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Public art is fraught with difficulty, not least because of the often unreasonable demands that are placed upon it. Our expectations for the genre tend toward the woozy and the sentimental: We want public art to enliven an often drab corporate or civic environment, to provide education for the uninformed and soothing uplift for the haggard, to "humanize" bad architecture and brutally built spaces.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | BETTY GOODWIN
It was a good night for Gronk. A very good night. Gronk, the artist, who goes by only one name, was savoring the irony of it all. Yes, of course, he said, it was an honor to see his paintings hanging inside the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. But it wasn't exactly the first time he had shown there. "In 1972," the East L.A. artist explained, "I came in the middle of the night and defaced all the entrances and exits of the museum with spray paint.
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