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Roberto Leyton

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NEWS
March 27, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
Panama's embassy here is a house divided--even subdivided--by the struggle for national leadership at home. Ambassador Juan B. Sosa, loyal to deposed President Eric A. Delvalle and recognized by the Reagan Administration, holds the keys to the building and has an office on the upper floor. He also controls the first-floor entry area, where a portrait of Delvalle is prominently displayed on the wall.
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NEWS
March 27, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
Panama's embassy here is a house divided--even subdivided--by the struggle for national leadership at home. Ambassador Juan B. Sosa, loyal to deposed President Eric A. Delvalle and recognized by the Reagan Administration, holds the keys to the building and has an office on the upper floor. He also controls the first-floor entry area, where a portrait of Delvalle is prominently displayed on the wall.
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NEWS
February 28, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The permanent council of the Organization of American States on Saturday night seated the envoy of the government of Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega over the objection of U.S. Ambassador Richard T. McCormack.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although it is still regarded with skepticism by many nations, the newly installed government of Panamanian President Guillermo Endara has fielded a diplomatic corps that is winning acceptance in Washington and among multinational organizations. So far, Endara's government has established official relations with the United States and 16 other nations, with Japan joining the group Friday.
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Reacting to drug charges lodged against him last week in the United States, Panama's military ruler, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, took steps Sunday to distance his government from Washington and to squeeze his opponents at home. He recalled his three top U.S.-based Panamanian diplomats, including his ambassador to Washington, and ordered Panamanian military students in the United States to return home. Noriega also called for a criminal probe of Panamanians who accused him of drug smuggling.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | PAUL HOUSTON and MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writers
The Reagan Administration declared Friday that it still recognizes Eric A. Delvalle as the president of Panama but ruled out U.S. military intervention to restore him to power or topple strongman Manuel A. Noriega. "No I don't think that's the answer," President Reagan said when asked if military force might be used by the United States. "There are limits on what we can do." But he declined to discuss other alternatives, such as a trade embargo.
NEWS
February 28, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The deposed president of Panama, Eric A. Delvalle, slipped away from his home and went into hiding Saturday, hours before the military here moved to order him into exile, U.S. and Panamanian sources said. Relatives and friends of Delvalle said that he secretly departed his ranch-style house near Panama City's financial district about midnight, eluding a military cordon that had been set up around his residence late Friday. In Washington, Juan B.
NEWS
December 4, 1985 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Panamanian diplomat Roberto Leyton took his family to the Fourth of July celebration near the Washington Monument last summer for fireworks and the Beach Boys concert, but he found a lot more. "I couldn't believe what I saw," he said. "Everybody consuming drugs in front of the police, doing all type of stuff. People even came to our group and offered us drugs for us to give them ice."
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