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Roberto Lovato

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NEWS
May 27, 1993 | NANCY ZUBIRI
Roberto Lovato, son of Salvadoran immigrants, simply wants to help immigrants to make it in the United States. He was the final choice in a three-month national search for executive director of the Central American Refugee Center in Pico-Union, better known as CARECEN. The 29-year-old UC Berkeley graduate, who grew up in San Francisco, had been the nonprofit organization's administrative director, managing its $2-million budget.
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NEWS
May 27, 1993 | NANCY ZUBIRI
Roberto Lovato, son of Salvadoran immigrants, simply wants to help immigrants to make it in the United States. He was the final choice in a three-month national search for executive director of the Central American Refugee Center in Pico-Union, better known as CARECEN. The 29-year-old UC Berkeley graduate, who grew up in San Francisco, had been the nonprofit organization's administrative director, managing its $2-million budget.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1993
Roberto Lovato, the administrative director of the Central American Refugee Center in Pico-Union, has been named the agency's executive director after a three-month search. The $34,000-a-year position opened after the Jan. 29 resignation of Madeline Janis, who headed the agency for three years and was credited with building the advocacy group into a nationally prominent social services organization with a $2-million annual budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1993
Roberto Lovato, the administrative director of the Central American Refugee Center in Pico-Union, has been named the agency's executive director after a three-month search. The $34,000-a-year position opened after the Jan. 29 resignation of Madeline Janis, who headed the agency for three years and was credited with building the advocacy group into a nationally prominent social services organization with a $2-million annual budget.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
Offering works by Fidel Castro, Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Malcolm X and Nelson Mandela, the Pathfinder bookstore for 10 years has been a meeting place for the political left from throughout the city. Although most of the store's activity has been geared toward leftist intellectuals, it has begun to focus on the plight of the unemployed and homeless in the Mid-City area. "I like the bookstore for its symbolic value and as a resource to the community," said Jaime Coyle of the Pico-Union area.
NEWS
May 26, 1993 | SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As jubilant representatives of Los Angeles' Salvadoran community praised the Clinton Administration on Tuesday for extending a refuge program, other local Central American advocacy groups intensified their efforts to get the same protection for Guatemalans in the United States. The push on behalf of Guatemalan immigrants came in the wake of the suspension of that country's constitution, the dissolution of its Congress and fears of a coup by the nation's powerful military.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The birthplace of two of the nation's first ethnic studies departments is now home to the first Central American studies minor, Cal State Northridge officials announced Monday. The program will focus on the half-million Guatemalan, Salvadoran, Honduran and other Central American immigrants in Southern California, a number projected to reach more than 2.5 million by 2010.
OPINION
January 24, 2004
Re " 'Sanctuary' Laws Stand in Justice's Way," by Heather Mac Donald, Commentary, Jan. 19: I cannot believe what I just read. Dozens of dangerous thugs who have been deported for such crimes as murder, assault with a deadly weapon, etc., can sneak back into Los Angeles and the police, knowing who they are, can do nothing because of an LAPD rule -- Special Order 40. This "sanctuary" rule, a testament to the political power of immigrant lobbies, puts...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2009 | Matea Gold
In a surprise announcement, CNN host Lou Dobbs resigned on the air Wednesday after a recent history of controversial comments on immigration, among other topics, drew heated protests from liberal groups and created friction within the cable network. Dobbs said that CNN/U.S. President Jon Klein released him from his contract so he could pursue other opportunities. He did not offer specifics but suggested that he is seeking a role in which he will not be constrained from speaking freely.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Martin Campos was only one day late. But the delay is likely to cause him lasting frustration and inconvenience. "This is so unfair," the dejected and disbelieving fruit salesman said Tuesday after he left the Department of Motor Vehicles office in South-Central Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2001 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small television network that found success by finely parsing foreign-language television markets--like a channel in Seattle that splits its programming between German- and Chinese-language shows--is sending out a new signal from the top of Mt. Wilson. On Monday, Venture Technologies Group launched KSFV-TV (Channel 26 and only available in Southern California), a 24-hour, Spanish-language television station that may be the first geared toward the estimated 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The birthplace of two of the nation's first ethnic studies departments is now home to the first Central American studies minor, Cal State Northridge officials announced Monday. The program will focus on the half-million Guatemalans, Salvadorans, Hondurans and other Central American immigrants in Southern California, a number projected to reach more than 2.5 million by 2010.
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