Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoberto Madrazo
IN THE NEWS

Roberto Madrazo

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
November 14, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Tabasco state Gov. Roberto Madrazo appeared assured of victory in a primary election to decide the 2006 presidential candidate for Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. Though the party has been divided, the only other candidate, Everardo Moreno, was not expected to win substantial support. Turnout was low.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
June 23, 2006 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
TORREON -- Mexican presidential candidate Roberto Madrazo stepped from the air-conditioned cool of a blue Cadillac Escalade to greet a crowd that had traveled hours by bus to see him. Reporters kept a ring around the lean, 53-year-old distance runner as he slowly made his way past thousands of well-wishers.
Advertisement
WORLD
September 20, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Elba Esther Gordillo resigned as secretary-general of the formerly ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, slamming the party's leadership as undemocratic and bureaucratic. Gordillo was supposed to assume party leadership automatically when Roberto Madrazo stepped down to run for the party's presidential nomination. Instead, a party assembly elected Mariano Palacios Alcocer as Madrazo's replacement.
WORLD
December 3, 2005 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
Micaela Padilla was shouting to be heard over the mariachi singer during a boisterous campaign rally Thursday night for Roberto Madrazo, presidential candidate of Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party. "I support Madrazo first because it's my party," she said, "and second because he's a sincere man, a man of his word." The 49-year-old housekeeper neatly captured Madrazo's problem: His party is more popular than he is.
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Manuel Andrade was declared the winner of Tabasco state's disputed race for governor--an important victory for Mexico's beleaguered Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, but a blow to the opposition, which had charged that the balloting was marred by fraud. State election officials announced late Sunday that Andrade won by more than 8,000 votes. The announcement came a week after the poll, which had been too close to call. Andrade's victory could help outgoing Gov.
NEWS
February 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Two contenders to lead Mexico's biggest political party back to the presidency appeared nearly tied in an election to pick a new chief. Figures released Monday afternoon by the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, showed Beatriz Paredes, leader of the lower house of Congress, ahead of former Tabasco state Gov. Roberto Madrazo by barely 2,600 votes, with 75.7% of ballots counted. Madrazo declared earlier that he had won.
WORLD
September 1, 2005 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
Mexico's former ruling party, known universally as the PRI, already has an unofficial campaign slogan for the 2006 presidential election: We know how to get things done. On Wednesday, Roberto Madrazo, the party's presumed candidate, finally got his own job done.
WORLD
June 23, 2006 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
TORREON -- Mexican presidential candidate Roberto Madrazo stepped from the air-conditioned cool of a blue Cadillac Escalade to greet a crowd that had traveled hours by bus to see him. Reporters kept a ring around the lean, 53-year-old distance runner as he slowly made his way past thousands of well-wishers.
WORLD
October 21, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Arturo Montiel, a former governor and one of the leading contenders in next year's presidential race in Mexico, announced Thursday that he was withdrawing his candidacy in the face of corruption allegations against his family. The decision appeared to leave the nomination of the powerful Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, to Montiel's rival, Roberto Madrazo, a former governor of Tabasco state.
WORLD
December 3, 2005 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
Micaela Padilla was shouting to be heard over the mariachi singer during a boisterous campaign rally Thursday night for Roberto Madrazo, presidential candidate of Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party. "I support Madrazo first because it's my party," she said, "and second because he's a sincere man, a man of his word." The 49-year-old housekeeper neatly captured Madrazo's problem: His party is more popular than he is.
WORLD
November 14, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Tabasco state Gov. Roberto Madrazo appeared assured of victory in a primary election to decide the 2006 presidential candidate for Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. Though the party has been divided, the only other candidate, Everardo Moreno, was not expected to win substantial support. Turnout was low.
WORLD
October 21, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Arturo Montiel, a former governor and one of the leading contenders in next year's presidential race in Mexico, announced Thursday that he was withdrawing his candidacy in the face of corruption allegations against his family. The decision appeared to leave the nomination of the powerful Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, to Montiel's rival, Roberto Madrazo, a former governor of Tabasco state.
WORLD
September 20, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Elba Esther Gordillo resigned as secretary-general of the formerly ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, slamming the party's leadership as undemocratic and bureaucratic. Gordillo was supposed to assume party leadership automatically when Roberto Madrazo stepped down to run for the party's presidential nomination. Instead, a party assembly elected Mariano Palacios Alcocer as Madrazo's replacement.
WORLD
September 1, 2005 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
Mexico's former ruling party, known universally as the PRI, already has an unofficial campaign slogan for the 2006 presidential election: We know how to get things done. On Wednesday, Roberto Madrazo, the party's presumed candidate, finally got his own job done.
WORLD
August 5, 2005 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
A dissident wing of the Institutional Revolutionary Party announced Thursday that Gov. Arturo Montiel of Mexico state would be its candidate against front-runner Roberto Madrazo for the former ruling party's nomination in next year's presidential election. The loosely organized group, which has been nicknamed All United Against Madrazo, chose Montiel, 61, over four other candidates -- two former governors, a serving governor and the party's leader in the Senate, Enrique Jackson.
WORLD
July 13, 2005 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
A year before the presidential election, this nation's oldest, most powerful party headed toward a destructive split resulting from the bitter enmity between its top leaders -- probable presidential nominee Roberto Madrazo and teachers union head Elba Esther Gordillo. Madrazo was to have resigned Tuesday as the Institutional Revolutionary Party's chief to campaign full time for next year's election. He would have been replaced by Gordillo under party rules.
WORLD
July 13, 2005 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
A year before the presidential election, this nation's oldest, most powerful party headed toward a destructive split resulting from the bitter enmity between its top leaders -- probable presidential nominee Roberto Madrazo and teachers union head Elba Esther Gordillo. Madrazo was to have resigned Tuesday as the Institutional Revolutionary Party's chief to campaign full time for next year's election. He would have been replaced by Gordillo under party rules.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, Roberto Madrazo was the bad boy of Mexican politics. The president tried to fire him. The opposition fought to impeach him. A top official of his own party invoked Adolf Hitler in questioning Madrazo's character. Critics have accused the candidate of illegal campaign spending, drug ties, election fraud. Could this be the man who brings democracy to the world's longest-ruling party?
NEWS
February 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Two contenders to lead Mexico's biggest political party back to the presidency appeared nearly tied in an election to pick a new chief. Figures released Monday afternoon by the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, showed Beatriz Paredes, leader of the lower house of Congress, ahead of former Tabasco state Gov. Roberto Madrazo by barely 2,600 votes, with 75.7% of ballots counted. Madrazo declared earlier that he had won.
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Manuel Andrade was declared the winner of Tabasco state's disputed race for governor--an important victory for Mexico's beleaguered Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, but a blow to the opposition, which had charged that the balloting was marred by fraud. State election officials announced late Sunday that Andrade won by more than 8,000 votes. The announcement came a week after the poll, which had been too close to call. Andrade's victory could help outgoing Gov.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|