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Roberto Marinho

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Roberto Marinho, who turned his father's newspaper into a media empire and became one of Brazil's wealthiest and most powerful men, died Wednesday. He was 98. Marinho died in Rio's Samaritano Hospital, where he had been taken earlier in the day, according to his Globo TV network. The cause of death was not announced. Marinho founded Organizacoes Globo, which included television, cable, pay television and print media outlets.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Roberto Marinho, who turned his father's newspaper into a media empire and became one of Brazil's wealthiest and most powerful men, died Wednesday. He was 98. Marinho died in Rio's Samaritano Hospital, where he had been taken earlier in the day, according to his Globo TV network. The cause of death was not announced. Marinho founded Organizacoes Globo, which included television, cable, pay television and print media outlets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Live-in lovers Silvana and Mauricio were having romantic troubles. She was jealous of Tamyris, his ex-wife. After the inevitable quarrel, Silvana kicked Mauricio out. Predictably, he went back to Tamyris. True to its genre, the Brazilian soap opera "Brega & Chique" dramatizes familiar conflicts of life and love. It also exemplifies the phenomenal success of Rede Globo, Brazil's predominant television network and the most pervasive private institution in this nation of 140 million people.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Live-in lovers Silvana and Mauricio were having romantic troubles. She was jealous of Tamyris, his ex-wife. After the inevitable quarrel, Silvana kicked Mauricio out. Predictably, he went back to Tamyris. True to its genre, the Brazilian soap opera "Brega & Chique" dramatizes familiar conflicts of life and love. It also exemplifies the phenomenal success of Rede Globo, Brazil's predominant television network and the most pervasive private institution in this nation of 140 million people.
WORLD
September 4, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
SAO PAULO, Brazil -- Globo, the media group that dominates Brazil's market and has become a target of the widespread protests in the country, has apologized for supporting the military dictatorship that took over almost 50 years ago. The editorial published in Saturday's edition of Globo's Rio de Janeiro-based newspaper took the country by surprise and leading some inĀ  rival outlets to wonder what Latin America's largest media group had accomplished with...
BUSINESS
April 1, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
Brazil's new government, in a gesture inspired by cultural nationalism, has put into effect a law that bans foreign ownership of companies that produce, distribute or exhibit motion pictures in this country, which is a large market for foreign films. The law, published in the official gazette last Friday, came as a surprise to both foreign distributors and the national film industry. American studios, represented here by Harry Stone, Latin American representative of the Motion Picture Assn.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 1960s, East German schoolteachers liked to ask their students a loaded question: Did the clock that appeared briefly on the family television screen each night counting down the final seconds before the evening news have dots or dashes in place of numbers? Anyone answering "dashes" was watching West German television--an act strictly forbidden by Communist authorities.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what is shaping up as Latin America's biggest media competition ever, two groups of entertainment heavyweights--including Rupert Murdoch, Hughes Electronics Corp. and the continent's top TV moguls--are about to do battle. The prize: a direct-to-home satellite TV business that will beam scores of channels into homes from Tijuana to Tierra del Fuego. We're talking Big Money. (The main competitors are sinking in about $500 million each.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | MAC MARGOLIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He doesn't look much like a celebrity. Pencil thin, weighing 103 pounds, Herbert (Betinho) de Souza seems to be all angles and no curves, his frame lost under a billowing shirt and trousers. A receding crown of graying hair frames a high forehead, punctuated by overgrown eyebrows. His hands seem too large for his wrists, and a watchband slides like a curtain ring nearly up to his elbow. His most startling features are his eyes, limpid and aqua-green. His gaze is at once kindly and piercing.
MAGAZINE
March 27, 1994 | John Powers, Contributing editor John Powers writes regularly for New York magazine and is a frequent commentator on American culture for the BBC
There are places you only visit when you're running for office or writing about someone who is. Such a place is Roraima (pronounced Roe-RYE-mah ), the Brazilian state known to the outside world, if it is known at all, for being home to the last of the Stone Age tribes, most famously the Yanomani.
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