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Roberto Matta

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May 9, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The Chilean-born Surrealist Roberto Matta is 86 and still going strong. Longevity may be among the artist's lesser accomplishments, as we're reminded by a rare West Coast exhibition of his work at Beverly Hills' Latin American Masters gallery. "Roberto Matta, Paintings and Drawings 1937-1959," a museum-quality selection of about 40 drawings and paintings, samples Matta's oeuvre from perhaps the heyday of his creativity. Arriving in Paris in 1932, he worked as a draftsman for Le Corbusier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By David Pagel
June Wayne (1918-2011) is best known for starting and running the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, a world-renowned institution that has been going strong for 53 years. She is also known as an innovative printmaker, her own lithographs outstanding examples of what the medium can deliver. As a painter, Wayne is not so well known. At Louis Stern Fine Arts, an introductory survey goes a long way to change that. “June Wayne: Eloquent Visionary” displays paintings alongside prints to reveal that Wayne moved freely between the media, gleaning insights from each and enhancing our understanding of both.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art continues to expand its Latin American holdings in a way both monumental and pertinent to the city. According to the museum's blog, Unframed, Roberto Matta's huge 1965-66 painting "Burn, Baby, Burn (L'escalade)" was acquired for the museum over the weekend by the Collectors Committee. The canvas is nearly 10 feet tall and 32 feet wide, which would likely make it the largest painting in LACMA's collection. The Chilean-born Matta (1911-2002) was famously expelled from the Surrealist movement in 1947 over a disagreement with Andre Breton.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
"Burn, Baby, Burn," the monumental, recently acquired 1965-66 painting by Chilean-born Roberto Matta (1911-2002), was installed the other day at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, on the fourth floor of the building housing the Art of the Americas. It's quite something -- all 320 square feet (more or less) of it. That's big. "Burn, Baby, Burn" is a portable mural. The word "mural" derives from "wall," and it's evident that Matta had a particular kind of wall in mind when he painted it. Only a public wall in a big lobby, commercial space or civic building (including an art museum)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By David Pagel
June Wayne (1918-2011) is best known for starting and running the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, a world-renowned institution that has been going strong for 53 years. She is also known as an innovative printmaker, her own lithographs outstanding examples of what the medium can deliver. As a painter, Wayne is not so well known. At Louis Stern Fine Arts, an introductory survey goes a long way to change that. “June Wayne: Eloquent Visionary” displays paintings alongside prints to reveal that Wayne moved freely between the media, gleaning insights from each and enhancing our understanding of both.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2004 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
"Picasso to Pollock: Modern Masterpieces From the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art" is both more and less than its title suggests. More artists are included in the 59-work exhibition at the Orange County Museum of Art than the mainline Modernists who traveled the established path from Pablo Picasso's Cubism to Jackson Pollock's drips via Surrealism's psychological kinks. To be historically accurate, in chronological terms, the five-gallery show would have to be retitled. But "Maurice B.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
You'll need a Sherpa guide to find the central premise behind "The Latin American Spirit: Art and Artists in the United States, 1920-1970." A sprawling, hugely ambitious historical survey on view at the San Diego Museum of Art through July 16, the show is above reproach in its effort to provide a new perspective on Latin art. However, this unwieldy extravaganza wobbles severely off course before it gets out of the gate. Assembled by a committee of seven curators and three consultants under the stewardship of Bronx Museum director Luis Cancel, the show, not surprisingly, lacks a central vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1986 | WILLIAM WILSON
Tragedy giggled through the art and life of Gordon Matta-Clark like a chill shadow on a sunny day. Dead at age 35, the artist was hardly a household name. His work was monumentally odd and conveys the same compelling dark Romantic penumbra as the rock star Jim Morrison--or Lord Byron, for that matter. An exhibition surveying the fruits of his brief life is on view at Cal State Long Beach until March 2 with a show of sculpture by Steve Wood.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
A superficial resemblance marks the famous drip paintings begun by Jackson Pollock in 1947 and the flux paintings begun five years earlier by Knud Merrild (1894-1954). (The Danish-born Modernist painter left Europe after World War I, spent time in Taos, N.M., with D.H. Lawrence and Mable Dodge, and arrived in Los Angeles in 1923; Pollock, a generation younger, didn't arrive until 1928, at age 16.) However, the operative word here is superficial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2002 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Chilean artist Roberto Sebastian Antonio Matta Echaurren -- known for Surrealistic images of cosmic wonderlands and apocalyptic dreams, executed under the name of Matta -- died Saturday in Italy, at 91. He had been hospitalized in Civitavecchia, near his home in the Tuscan town of Tarquinia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art continues to expand its Latin American holdings in a way both monumental and pertinent to the city. According to the museum's blog, Unframed, Roberto Matta's huge 1965-66 painting "Burn, Baby, Burn (L'escalade)" was acquired for the museum over the weekend by the Collectors Committee. The canvas is nearly 10 feet tall and 32 feet wide, which would likely make it the largest painting in LACMA's collection. The Chilean-born Matta (1911-2002) was famously expelled from the Surrealist movement in 1947 over a disagreement with Andre Breton.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2004 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
"Picasso to Pollock: Modern Masterpieces From the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art" is both more and less than its title suggests. More artists are included in the 59-work exhibition at the Orange County Museum of Art than the mainline Modernists who traveled the established path from Pablo Picasso's Cubism to Jackson Pollock's drips via Surrealism's psychological kinks. To be historically accurate, in chronological terms, the five-gallery show would have to be retitled. But "Maurice B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2002 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Chilean artist Roberto Sebastian Antonio Matta Echaurren -- known for Surrealistic images of cosmic wonderlands and apocalyptic dreams, executed under the name of Matta -- died Saturday in Italy, at 91. He had been hospitalized in Civitavecchia, near his home in the Tuscan town of Tarquinia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
A superficial resemblance marks the famous drip paintings begun by Jackson Pollock in 1947 and the flux paintings begun five years earlier by Knud Merrild (1894-1954). (The Danish-born Modernist painter left Europe after World War I, spent time in Taos, N.M., with D.H. Lawrence and Mable Dodge, and arrived in Los Angeles in 1923; Pollock, a generation younger, didn't arrive until 1928, at age 16.) However, the operative word here is superficial.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The Chilean-born Surrealist Roberto Matta is 86 and still going strong. Longevity may be among the artist's lesser accomplishments, as we're reminded by a rare West Coast exhibition of his work at Beverly Hills' Latin American Masters gallery. "Roberto Matta, Paintings and Drawings 1937-1959," a museum-quality selection of about 40 drawings and paintings, samples Matta's oeuvre from perhaps the heyday of his creativity. Arriving in Paris in 1932, he worked as a draftsman for Le Corbusier.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
You'll need a Sherpa guide to find the central premise behind "The Latin American Spirit: Art and Artists in the United States, 1920-1970." A sprawling, hugely ambitious historical survey on view at the San Diego Museum of Art through July 16, the show is above reproach in its effort to provide a new perspective on Latin art. However, this unwieldy extravaganza wobbles severely off course before it gets out of the gate. Assembled by a committee of seven curators and three consultants under the stewardship of Bronx Museum director Luis Cancel, the show, not surprisingly, lacks a central vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
"Burn, Baby, Burn," the monumental, recently acquired 1965-66 painting by Chilean-born Roberto Matta (1911-2002), was installed the other day at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, on the fourth floor of the building housing the Art of the Americas. It's quite something -- all 320 square feet (more or less) of it. That's big. "Burn, Baby, Burn" is a portable mural. The word "mural" derives from "wall," and it's evident that Matta had a particular kind of wall in mind when he painted it. Only a public wall in a big lobby, commercial space or civic building (including an art museum)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2001
Highlights from a May 31 New York auction of Latin American art will be on public view today and Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Sotheby's galleries, 9665 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. Among the attractions are paintings by Frida Kahlo, Rufino Tamayo, Roberto Matta and David Alfaro Siqueiros. Information: (310) 274-0340.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1986 | WILLIAM WILSON
Tragedy giggled through the art and life of Gordon Matta-Clark like a chill shadow on a sunny day. Dead at age 35, the artist was hardly a household name. His work was monumentally odd and conveys the same compelling dark Romantic penumbra as the rock star Jim Morrison--or Lord Byron, for that matter. An exhibition surveying the fruits of his brief life is on view at Cal State Long Beach until March 2 with a show of sculpture by Steve Wood.
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