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Roberto Rossellini

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2009 | Dennis Lim
Roberto Rossellini is commonly regarded as the founding father of Italian neorealism. It's a lofty label, since the movement was among the most influential in all of film history, but also one that doesn't quite do justice to his long, multifaceted career. The intense and unadorned films that Rossellini directed as Italy was emerging from the rubble of World War II -- "Open City" (1945), "Paisan" (1946), "Germany Year Zero" (1948) -- sealed his international reputation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By David Ng
Isabella Rossellini is bringing her odd-ball Sundance Channel series "Green Porno" to Los Angeles as a live performance scheduled to take place at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex on Nov. 2. "Green Porno," which has appeared online since 2008 and has also aired on the Sundance Channel on cable TV, is a series of short episodes humorously dealing with mating rituals in the animal kingdom. Rossellini created and stars in the eco-themed series. The stage version was co-written by Rossellini and the esteemed French screenwriter and playwright Jean-Claude Carrière, best known for his collaborations with Luis Buñuel.
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NEWS
February 15, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
IN Bernardo Bertolucci's first major film, 1964's "Before the Revolution," there is a scene in which two men are sitting at a table. One man says to the other, "Fabrizio, we cannot live without Rossellini." "And that is the truth of it," Rossellini scholar Tag Gallagher says today. "We cannot live without Rossellini!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
The letter was two sentences long, addressed to "Dear Mr. Rossellini" and signed "Ingrid Bergman. " Like many moviegoers in the late 1940s, the actress was deeply affected by "Rome, Open City" and "Paisan," Roberto Rossellini's landmarks of neorealist cinema. Alone among the Italian director's admirers, she offered her star power and talents, as "a Swedish actress who speaks English very well," in hope of an on-screen collaboration. Rossellini accepted eagerly. But any expectation that Bergman's high profile would heighten his clout at the box office were dashed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By David Ng
Isabella Rossellini is bringing her odd-ball Sundance Channel series "Green Porno" to Los Angeles as a live performance scheduled to take place at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex on Nov. 2. "Green Porno," which has appeared online since 2008 and has also aired on the Sundance Channel on cable TV, is a series of short episodes humorously dealing with mating rituals in the animal kingdom. Rossellini created and stars in the eco-themed series. The stage version was co-written by Rossellini and the esteemed French screenwriter and playwright Jean-Claude Carrière, best known for his collaborations with Luis Buñuel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Susan King
Pier Paolo Pasolini was one of Italian cinema's most influential, controversial and iconoclastic filmmakers, arriving on the scene after neo-realists such as Vittorio De Sica and Roberto Rossellini. The openly gay playwright, novelist, political theorist, journalist, teacher and poet made films in order to "represent reality with reality. " UCLA Film & Television Archive's new retrospective, "Pure and Impure: The Films of Pier Paolo Pasolini," which opens Friday at the Billy Wilder Theater, features new prints from Istituto Luce Cinecitta in Rome.
BOOKS
July 13, 1997 | M.G. LORD, M.G. Lord is the author of "Forever Barbie: The Unauthorized Biography of a Real Doll." She is working on an informal cultural history of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Inspired perhaps by the performance of her mother, Ingrid Bergman in "Joan of Arc," Isabella Rossellini hears voices. What is more, she writes them down. These transcribed dialogues, often between dead people, make "Some of Me" a far cry from your garden-variety celebrity autobiography. The book is full of loopy non sequiturs: digressions on the mating habits of insects, the embalming products that keep Lenin's corpse looking perky, even the tapeworm Maria Callas swallowed to lose 80 pounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Saul Austerlitz
Italian filmmaker Marco Bellocchio has been behind the camera for so long -- he made his directorial debut nearly half a century ago -- that it is hard to keep his whole career in mind without breaking it down into smaller, more easily digestible parts. There is the wunderkind Bellocchio of the mid-1960s, elegantly taking a sledgehammer to Italian society while barely out of short pants; the subtle European mannerist of the '80s and '90s, adapting occasionally obscure theatrical masterworks for the screen; and the daring political rabble-rouser of the past decade, Bellocchio's latest film, "Vincere," is the most explosive yet of his provocations, documenting the rise to power of future fascist dictator Benito Mussolini from the perspective of the wife he abandoned.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
The letter was two sentences long, addressed to "Dear Mr. Rossellini" and signed "Ingrid Bergman. " Like many moviegoers in the late 1940s, the actress was deeply affected by "Rome, Open City" and "Paisan," Roberto Rossellini's landmarks of neorealist cinema. Alone among the Italian director's admirers, she offered her star power and talents, as "a Swedish actress who speaks English very well," in hope of an on-screen collaboration. Rossellini accepted eagerly. But any expectation that Bergman's high profile would heighten his clout at the box office were dashed.
NEWS
July 10, 1997 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woman whose face has sold zillions of pots and jars and sticks of beautifying potions and lotions ought to know a thing or two about makeup. Indeed. That's why she's taking it off. Isabella Rossellini, at the mercy of TV makeup artists earlier this day, is wiping her face as she emerges from her hotel bathroom. "You know sometimes you see disturbed old women that use a lot of makeup that look like masks," she is saying. "They do make you up like that a bit."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Susan King
Pier Paolo Pasolini was one of Italian cinema's most influential, controversial and iconoclastic filmmakers, arriving on the scene after neo-realists such as Vittorio De Sica and Roberto Rossellini. The openly gay playwright, novelist, political theorist, journalist, teacher and poet made films in order to "represent reality with reality. " UCLA Film & Television Archive's new retrospective, "Pure and Impure: The Films of Pier Paolo Pasolini," which opens Friday at the Billy Wilder Theater, features new prints from Istituto Luce Cinecitta in Rome.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Saul Austerlitz
Italian filmmaker Marco Bellocchio has been behind the camera for so long -- he made his directorial debut nearly half a century ago -- that it is hard to keep his whole career in mind without breaking it down into smaller, more easily digestible parts. There is the wunderkind Bellocchio of the mid-1960s, elegantly taking a sledgehammer to Italian society while barely out of short pants; the subtle European mannerist of the '80s and '90s, adapting occasionally obscure theatrical masterworks for the screen; and the daring political rabble-rouser of the past decade, Bellocchio's latest film, "Vincere," is the most explosive yet of his provocations, documenting the rise to power of future fascist dictator Benito Mussolini from the perspective of the wife he abandoned.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2010 | By Sam Adams
Even after a painstaking restoration which presents them in the best condition seen for decades, the films in Roberto Rossellini's "War Trilogy" have at times the battered quality of found footage, an appropriate state given their focus on the physical and social destruction of the Second World War. In "Rome, Open City" (1945), "Paisan" (1946) and "Germany Year Zero" (1948) -- packaged together and recently released as a new set from the Criterion Collection -- the vacant streets and blasted buildings of post-fascist Europe take center stage, often to the exclusion of the movie's ostensible protagonists.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2009 | Dennis Lim
Roberto Rossellini is commonly regarded as the founding father of Italian neorealism. It's a lofty label, since the movement was among the most influential in all of film history, but also one that doesn't quite do justice to his long, multifaceted career. The intense and unadorned films that Rossellini directed as Italy was emerging from the rubble of World War II -- "Open City" (1945), "Paisan" (1946), "Germany Year Zero" (1948) -- sealed his international reputation.
NEWS
February 15, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
IN Bernardo Bertolucci's first major film, 1964's "Before the Revolution," there is a scene in which two men are sitting at a table. One man says to the other, "Fabrizio, we cannot live without Rossellini." "And that is the truth of it," Rossellini scholar Tag Gallagher says today. "We cannot live without Rossellini!"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2006 | Susan King
ISABELLA ROSSELLINI, the 54-year-old actress, model and cosmetics spokesperson, has been preoccupied lately with thoughts of her father, Italian neo-realist director Roberto Rossellini, who would've been 100 this year (he died at 71 in 1977).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2010 | By Sam Adams
Even after a painstaking restoration which presents them in the best condition seen for decades, the films in Roberto Rossellini's "War Trilogy" have at times the battered quality of found footage, an appropriate state given their focus on the physical and social destruction of the Second World War. In "Rome, Open City" (1945), "Paisan" (1946) and "Germany Year Zero" (1948) -- packaged together and recently released as a new set from the Criterion Collection -- the vacant streets and blasted buildings of post-fascist Europe take center stage, often to the exclusion of the movie's ostensible protagonists.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2006 | Susan King
ISABELLA ROSSELLINI, the 54-year-old actress, model and cosmetics spokesperson, has been preoccupied lately with thoughts of her father, Italian neo-realist director Roberto Rossellini, who would've been 100 this year (he died at 71 in 1977).
BOOKS
July 13, 1997 | M.G. LORD, M.G. Lord is the author of "Forever Barbie: The Unauthorized Biography of a Real Doll." She is working on an informal cultural history of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Inspired perhaps by the performance of her mother, Ingrid Bergman in "Joan of Arc," Isabella Rossellini hears voices. What is more, she writes them down. These transcribed dialogues, often between dead people, make "Some of Me" a far cry from your garden-variety celebrity autobiography. The book is full of loopy non sequiturs: digressions on the mating habits of insects, the embalming products that keep Lenin's corpse looking perky, even the tapeworm Maria Callas swallowed to lose 80 pounds.
NEWS
July 10, 1997 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woman whose face has sold zillions of pots and jars and sticks of beautifying potions and lotions ought to know a thing or two about makeup. Indeed. That's why she's taking it off. Isabella Rossellini, at the mercy of TV makeup artists earlier this day, is wiping her face as she emerges from her hotel bathroom. "You know sometimes you see disturbed old women that use a lot of makeup that look like masks," she is saying. "They do make you up like that a bit."
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