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Roberto S Benedicto

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October 22, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
In the large Filipino community of Southern California, California Overseas Bank has for years been nicknamed the "Philippine Bank of Los Angeles" because of its close relations with the Manila regime of former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos. In fact, bank Chairman Roberto S. Benedicto served as the Philippines' ambassador to Japan for six years in the early 1970s under Marcos.
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NEWS
November 24, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vowing "no favors, no excuses," President Corazon Aquino's first official act in office in February, 1986, was to create a commission to chase at least $10 billion in assets and cash allegedly looted from the impoverished nation by deposed dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos and his cronies. Today, nearly five years later, critics say that the Presidential Commission on Good Government has little to show for those high hopes except excuses.
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NEWS
October 22, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writers
A federal grand jury Friday indicted former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos and his wife, Imelda, on charges that they diverted Philippine government funds to buy millions of dollars' worth of New York real estate in a massive racketeering scheme of fraud, embezzlement, bribery and obstruction of justice. A 79-page indictment charged the Marcoses, Saudi Arabian financier Adnan Khashoggi, seven other individuals and Los Angeles-based California Overseas Bank.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In order to avoid federal prosecution, the closest friend and confidant of former dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos has agreed to turn over to the Philippines a Los Angeles bank that federal prosecutors say he created to launder funds for the late Philippine leader, The Times has learned.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In order to avoid federal prosecution, the closest friend and confidant of former dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos has agreed to turn over to the Philippines a Los Angeles bank that federal prosecutors say he created to launder funds for the late Philippine leader, The Times has learned.
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vowing "no favors, no excuses," President Corazon Aquino's first official act in office in February, 1986, was to create a commission to chase at least $10 billion in assets and cash allegedly looted from the impoverished nation by deposed dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos and his cronies. Today, nearly five years later, critics say that the Presidential Commission on Good Government has little to show for those high hopes except excuses.
NEWS
March 14, 1986 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The Philippine government announced Thursday that it has frozen all the bank accounts of 33 relatives and associates of deposed President Ferdinand E. Marcos and is also investigating whether Marcos associates may have diverted funds from the nation's gambling casinos. Those whose bank deposits were frozen included Marcos' wife, Imelda, his children, former armed forces chief of staff Fabian C. Ver and eight businessmen closely connected to the former president. Jose B. Fernandez Jr.
NEWS
October 1, 1986 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Deposed Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos pleaded the Fifth Amendment dozens of times Tuesday as attorneys representing the Philippine government questioned him for more than four hours on allegations that he robbed his country of billions of dollars. The government has charged that Marcos, his wife, Imelda, and close relatives and friends removed the money from the Philippine treasury in a 20-year scheme patterned after a criminal syndicate.
NEWS
October 22, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
In the large Filipino community of Southern California, California Overseas Bank has for years been nicknamed the "Philippine Bank of Los Angeles" because of its close relations with the Manila regime of former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos. In fact, bank Chairman Roberto S. Benedicto served as the Philippines' ambassador to Japan for six years in the early 1970s under Marcos.
NEWS
October 22, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writers
A federal grand jury Friday indicted former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos and his wife, Imelda, on charges that they diverted Philippine government funds to buy millions of dollars' worth of New York real estate in a massive racketeering scheme of fraud, embezzlement, bribery and obstruction of justice. A 79-page indictment charged the Marcoses, Saudi Arabian financier Adnan Khashoggi, seven other individuals and Los Angeles-based California Overseas Bank.
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