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Roberto Saviano

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008 | Susan King
Roberto Saviano, the Italian author of "Gomorrah" who has been living under police protection in Rome due to death threats he's received from the Camorra, the Neapolitan Mafia, is coming to Los Angeles this week to participate in "Napoli! The System, the Camorra and the Pizza: Breaking the Stereotypes," a three-day program of Neapolitan cinema, literature and food at USC. The film version of "Gomorrah," which Saviano co-wrote and which won the grand jury prize at Cannes, screens Friday at the Norris Cinema Theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
Five films are competing for the foreign language Oscar this year, but this terrific film from Italy, winner of both the Grand Jury Prize at Cannes and the European Film Award, will inexplicably not be among them. It is a gangster film, but not the usual glamorizing kind. It is set not in Sicily but in Naples, where the Camorra rules the city and environs like an alternate government. Directed by Matteo Garrone and based on the groundbreaking book by Italian journalist Roberto Saviano, "Gomorrah" is a vividly panoramic film about a pitiless world of criminality -- a world where no human impulse or attempt at decency goes unpunished, a world where it's worth your life to get out alive.
NEWS
December 3, 2008 | Rachel Abramowitz, John Horn, Elena Howe, Susan King, Mark Olsen and Tom O'Neil
Mt. Oscar: To grab the brass ring -- or in this case the Golden O -- wrap yourself in raves and pack lots of buzz. This week's altitude readings are by Rachel Abramowitz, John Horn, Elena Howe, Susan King, Mark Olsen and Tom O'Neil. PEAKING EMPTY LIVES: Five-time Oscar nominee Kate Winslet is riveting in "Revolutionary Road." But taken with her "Little Children" role, she may be in danger of specializing in unfulfilled suburbanites.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Jason McGahan
After 10 years of death-dealing, scorched-earth cartel warfare and twice the total body count of U.S. forces in Vietnam, it's high time an American audience found out just what is happening down south of the Rio Grande. No single recent work on the subject peers more deeply than Anabel Hernández's "Narcoland," an investigative magnum opus by a Mexican journalist driven by purpose verging on despair. Empirically devastating, Hernández's book delves into the rusty filing cabinets of cold cases, shelved for making the people in power uncomfortable.
NEWS
December 17, 2008 | Sam Adams, Adams is a freelance writer.
Matteo Garrone's "Gomorrah" may not end up as the academy's favorite foreign film but surely it can already claim the title of least glamorous mafia movie ever made. The movie's portrait, based on a "nonfiction novel" by Roberto Saviano, of the loosely federated Neapolitan crime syndicate known as the Camorra is set in a barren wasteland of concrete apartment blocks and parched earth. There are no suave gangsters and glossy nightclubs, just bottom feeders jostling for crumbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
Few people read more literature that's written outside their own borders than the French. And if you want to get a really good sense about what's out there in the vast multilingual world of books, there's no better place to look than a French newspaper. This week, the respected Paris daily newspaper Libération asked 20 non-French writers to recommend 20 recently published books to their readers. (Among them there is a certain American novelist and blogger for Jacket Copy - moi .)
WORLD
May 19, 2009 | Sebastian Rotella
Neapolitan gangsters, including the alleged fugitive boss captured Saturday night in the city of Marbella, have a name for Spain: La Costa Nostra, or Our Coast. The term plays off Cosa Nostra, or Our Thing, as the mafia is called, and underscores what authorities say: that Spain has become a top foreign base for the Naples underworld, the Camorra, in the last decade. Spanish police have arrested half a dozen suspected Neapolitan crime figures this year alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2008 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
"Gomorrah" is a gangster film that departs from the glamorizing norm. The acclaimed winner of the Grand Jury Prize at Cannes and Italy's entry in the Oscar race, it is a vividly panoramic film about a pitiless world of criminality. A world where no human impulse or attempt at decency goes unpunished, a world where it's worth your life to get out alive.
WORLD
October 19, 2008 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
Roberto Saviano went to war when he was 23. The daring writer got on his motorcycle and prowled the savage empire of the Camorra, the Neapolitan mafia: ports, sweatshops, housing projects and toxic waste dumps. The result was "Gomorrah," an angry, poetic expose of the mob's murderous might and swaggering, self-referential subculture. In the surprise 2006 bestseller, Saviano riffs on female gangsters who drive Smart cars and wear yellow jumpsuits like Uma Thurman in "Kill Bill."
NEWS
December 10, 2008 | TOM O'NEIL
Arguably the most important Oscars reward those people who write the words we hear in movies, shoot the visual images we see on the screen and weave those together with the actors' performances. There's a lot of real drama in the writing, cinematography and directing races this year. Could a woman be nominated for cinematography for the first time? Could Batman and Iron Man break down other Oscar barriers? DIRECTOR Favorites Darren Aronofsky, "The Wrestler" Danny Boyle, "Slumdog Millionaire" Stephen Daldry, "The Reader" Jonathan Demme, "Rachel Getting Married" David Fincher, "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" Ron Howard, "Frost/Nixon" Baz Luhrmann, "Australia" Christopher Nolan, "The Dark Knight" Sam Mendes, "Revolutionary Road" John Patrick Shanley, "Doubt" Gus Van Sant, "Milk" Spotlight: Oscar voters love art-house darlings who cross over to prove they can helm popular hits.
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