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Roberto Suarez Gomez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000
Roberto Suarez Gomez, 68, a Bolivian drug trafficker who called himself the "king of cocaine." Suarez Gomez played a major role in the expansion of cocaine trafficking in Bolivia, and gained notoriety in 1983 when he offered to pay the country's foreign debt of $3 billion with proceeds from cocaine trafficking. Suarez Gomez was born into a prominent ranching family in the tropical Beni region.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000
Roberto Suarez Gomez, 68, a Bolivian drug trafficker who called himself the "king of cocaine." Suarez Gomez played a major role in the expansion of cocaine trafficking in Bolivia, and gained notoriety in 1983 when he offered to pay the country's foreign debt of $3 billion with proceeds from cocaine trafficking. Suarez Gomez was born into a prominent ranching family in the tropical Beni region.
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NEWS
July 22, 1988
Bolivian police seized Roberto Suarez Gomez, considered one of the top cocaine traffickers in South America. Suarez, 56, is wanted in the United States on drug trafficking charges and has been called by authorities the godfather of Bolivia's illegal cocaine trade and a major supplier of drugs to the Medellin, Colombia, drug cartel. Upon hearing news of the capture, Miami's Chief Assistant U.S. Atty. Richard Gregorie said, "He's the biggest cocaine producer in the world."
NEWS
August 31, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Under pressure from foreign allies and betrayed by a trusted nephew, the king suddenly tumbles from power. He tries mightily to recover his lost status, but in vain. His fortunes take a final plunge as he is seized by old enemies and locked away. If it weren't about the misfortunes of a South American drug lord, the story might throb with the classical elements of a Greek tragedy. Instead, it oozes with the sordid drama of a Mafia movie.
NEWS
August 31, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Under pressure from foreign allies and betrayed by a trusted nephew, the king suddenly tumbles from power. He tries mightily to recover his lost status, but in vain. His fortunes take a final plunge as he is seized by old enemies and locked away. If it weren't about the misfortunes of a South American drug lord, the story might throb with the classical elements of a Greek tragedy. Instead, it oozes with the sordid drama of a Mafia movie.
NEWS
October 11, 1986 | Associated Press
Bolivian and U.S. drug agents raided this town Friday in search of cocaine traffickers, then fled during a protest by hundreds of angry residents, some shouting, "Kill the Yankees!" No arrests were made and no cocaine was seized. Authorities said there were no reports of injuries. Bolivian officials, assisted by U.S. troops, have been raiding cocaine laboratories at jungle ranches in Bolivia for the last three months.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | ANDREA FORD and JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal drug agents on Thursday quietly arrested a San Marino resident described as one of the world's largest cocaine traffickers and successor to the "king" of the Bolivian cocaine trade. The arrest of Jorge Roca-Suarez, 38, at his 19-room house was confirmed by Julius C. Beretta, special agent in charge of the San Diego office of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Agents also arrested Roca's wife, Beatriz Roca-Torres, 40, in nearby Monterey Park, Beretta said.
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, U.S. Customs agents in Miami opened an upright freezer that was being shipped from Los Angeles to Bolivia. Inside was cold cash--more than $2 million in U.S. currency. Two weeks later, customs agents in Miami opened two more shipments--stereo speakers and vacuum cleaners--en route from Los Angeles to Bolivia. Inside one speaker was $500,000. Inside the two vacuum cleaners was $398,950.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1991 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, U.S. Customs Service agents in Miami opened an upright freezer that was being shipped from Los Angeles to Bolivia. Inside was cold cash, and plenty of it--more than $2 million in U.S. currency. Two weeks later, Customs agents in Miami opened two more shipments--stereo speakers and vacuum cleaners--en route from Los Angeles to Bolivia. Inside one speaker was $500,000. Inside the two vacuum cleaners was $398,950.
NEWS
July 22, 1988
Bolivian police seized Roberto Suarez Gomez, considered one of the top cocaine traffickers in South America. Suarez, 56, is wanted in the United States on drug trafficking charges and has been called by authorities the godfather of Bolivia's illegal cocaine trade and a major supplier of drugs to the Medellin, Colombia, drug cartel. Upon hearing news of the capture, Miami's Chief Assistant U.S. Atty. Richard Gregorie said, "He's the biggest cocaine producer in the world."
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