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Roberto Suazo Cordoba

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April 7, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, as part of a bid to ensure Honduran military assistance to the Nicaraguan rebels, told the president of Honduras in 1985 that the United States was accelerating economic aid payments to his country, according to a government document released Thursday.
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NEWS
April 7, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, as part of a bid to ensure Honduran military assistance to the Nicaraguan rebels, told the president of Honduras in 1985 that the United States was accelerating economic aid payments to his country, according to a government document released Thursday.
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NEWS
January 19, 1986
Honduran President-elect Jose Azcona Hoya said he is prepared to sign a regional peace accord that would remove the U.S. military from his nation if Nicaragua sends home its foreign military advisers. Azcona, who will replace outgoing President Roberto Suazo Cordoba next week, ended two days of talks in Washington with top Administration officials. At a news conference, he expressed confidence that a "comprehensive settlement" for regional peace could be achieved "before the end of the year."
NEWS
November 21, 1985 | Associated Press
The former chief of staff of the Honduran Army was arrested Wednesday on charges he hired a hit squad to assassinate the Central American country's president in an attempt to overthrow the government, the FBI said. Gen. Jose A. Bueso Rosa was arrested as he arrived at Miami International Airport from Santiago, Chile, FBI spokesman Paul Miller said.
NEWS
April 8, 1989 | JACK NELSON and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
The Administration of former President Ronald Reagan failed to give the congressional Iran-Contra committees a key memo that set in motion a secret plan to secure military assistance from Honduras for the Nicaraguan rebels in 1985 in return for stepped-up U.S. aid to Honduras, congressional sources said Friday.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The chairman of the now-defunct House Iran-Contra Committee is demanding a formal explanation from the White House on why his panel never received two key documents suggesting that then-Vice President George Bush was involved in setting up a secret quid pro quo deal with Honduras to aid the Nicaraguan rebels, according to a letter obtained by The Times. Rep. Lee H. Hamilton (D-Ind.), who made the demand in a letter to White House counsel C. Boyden Gray, said that an extensive review of committee files over the last week indicates that Congress was denied at least two of the documents that have since turned up in evidence at the trial of former White House aide Oliver L. North.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
A White House document released in the trial of Oliver L. North indicates that President Bush, while vice president, was informed that U.S. military aid was being given to Honduras as a "quid pro quo" because of that country's help for Nicaragua's Contra rebels. The document, a memorandum distributed at a 1985 Oval Office meeting attended by Bush, strengthens earlier indications that he was aware the Reagan Administration was promising aid to Honduras in exchange for help for the Contras at a time when Congress had prohibited U.S. aid "directly or indirectly" to the rebels.
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writers
Hanging over the Oliver L. North trial from start to finish was a question that transcended the fate of one previously obscure Marine officer: How closely involved in the Iran-Contra affair were then-President Ronald Reagan and now-President Bush? Those questions still could grow into full-scale legal migraines for the former President and his successor when the next major Iran-Contra figure--former National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter--goes on trial. Bush and Reagan escaped with relatively minor headaches at North's trial, despite revelations that they knew more than they have acknowledged publicly about his efforts to aid Nicaragua's rebels.
NEWS
May 12, 1987 | SARA FRITZ and MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, while pledging publicly never to yield to terrorists' demands, personally approved an unsuccessful scheme to ransom at least two Americans being held hostage in Lebanon in 1985 with $2 million provided by Texas tycoon H. Ross Perot, former National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane said Monday.
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