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Roberto Urrutia

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SPORTS
August 12, 1987 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
It had been a long nine years since Roberto Urrutia last competed in an international weightlifting event, but there he was on the stage of the Circle Theater with a Pan Am medal around his neck, Cuban flags flying overhead alongside the Stars and Stripes and the Cuban national anthem playing. It was an emotional moment. The last time he held over his head barbells of more than twice his weight, he was the pride of Cuba, a world champion.
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SPORTS
August 12, 1987 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
It had been a long nine years since Roberto Urrutia last competed in an international weightlifting event, but there he was on the stage of the Circle Theater with a Pan Am medal around his neck, Cuban flags flying overhead alongside the Stars and Stripes and the Cuban national anthem playing. It was an emotional moment. The last time he held over his head barbells of more than twice his weight, he was the pride of Cuba, a world champion.
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SPORTS
August 13, 1987 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. team handball player, James Buehning, committed such a flagrant foul in a game last weekend that even his mother thought he should be suspended. After Buehning, a member of the 1984 Olympic team, slapped a Canadian player, who reportedly had provoked the response, the U.S. player was suspended for the rest of the Pan American Games. "I do feel punishment was warranted," said his mother, Renate Buehning, chairman of the U.S. women's team handball program.
SPORTS
August 9, 1987 | RICHARD LUNA, United Press International
The slogan "Listos Para Vencer," or "Ready To Win," is prominitely displayed throughout Havana, Cuba. The slogan adorns Sports City, Cuba's main training facility, in colorful neon lights, as well as on a right-field lightpole at Estadio Latinoamericano, where crowds of 50,000-plus gather regularly to watch baseball. The theme is very much a part of Cuba's 458-member athletic delegation participating at the 10th Pan American Games.
SPORTS
August 16, 1987 | KEN DENLINGER, Washington Post
When Roberta Ross arrived to watch women's team handball the other day, she was surprised by security that included having her purse searched. Same with men's volleyball a while later. And when the procedure was about to be repeated a third time, before men's softball, she concluded: "Must be the Cubans playing." It was. Cuba is the lightning rod for these 10th Pan Am Games. Drawn by it, and toward it, Cuba symbolizes what is good and also frustrating about this particular athletic blip.
SPORTS
July 11, 1988 | Randy Harvey
In keeping with tradition, the first three finishers in each event at the United States track and field trials will become members of the U.S. Olympic team. That is the fairest approach to selecting an Olympic team. But is it the best approach? The question was raised again last week, when Greg Foster, two-time world champion in the 110-meter hurdles, broke his arm during a workout, thus jeopardizing his chances of even being able to compete in the trials, which begin Friday in Indianapolis.
SPORTS
August 8, 1987 | CURT HOLBREICH, Times Staff Writer
In the world of international athletics, the Pan American Games have been little more than a pre-Olympic showing of Yankee might: Swoop into a Central or South American country with a well-trained, well-financed team and leave two weeks later with most of the medals, making snide remarks about the lack of sophistication of the host country. This year will be different. The games are in Indianapolis. Jokes about functioning indoor plumbing are out. Wholesome Hoosier hospitality is in.
SPORTS
August 31, 1988 | SCOTT OSTLER, Times Staff Writer
Abe Lincoln grew up in a log cabin in Illinois. Babe Ruth spent his youth in a Baltimore industrial school. The Wright brothers built flying machines in their bicycle shop in Dayton, Ohio. But when it comes to humble cradles of the Great American Dream, Roberto Antonio (Tony) Urrutia has 'em all beat. Urrutia's entry is an abandoned car on a side street somewhere in the Little Havana barrio of Miami.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Soviet television has 28 correspondents here for the Summer Olympics, which is more than twice as many as it had in Washington for the Ronald Reagan-Mikhail Gorbachev summit. As popular as Gorbachev is at home, Sergei Bubka is more so. Although the Soviet media is now permitted to report bad news, they will be hard-pressed to find it in Seoul. The Soviet Union is expected to win more gold medals than any other country, perhaps as many as 50.
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