Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoberts Tilton
IN THE NEWS

Roberts Tilton

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2012 | By Holly Myers
Few artists working in Los Angeles today have been as consistently adamant in their politics as Daniel Joseph Martinez. From his famous contribution to the 1993 Whitney Biennial, “I can't imagine ever wanting to be white” - a work whose edge has yet to dull in 20 years of near-constant citation - to his recent trek along the 800-mile length of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, Martinez's work is scored with outrage and the particular brand of analytical fascination...
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Amid his pensive, engrossing paintings now at Roberts & Tilton, Noah Davis has planted something of a joke: a tight, U-shaped mini-exhibition space formed by temporary walls covered in scuffed gray fabric. Three small oil paintings hang within but are impossible to see well. "Stacked Cubicles/My Last Art Fair" offers an uncharacteristic moment of levity from Davis, a knowing poke at the crowded and often claustrophobic conditions of art fairs, a self-deprecating snicker at his allotted sliver of visibility.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Amid his pensive, engrossing paintings now at Roberts & Tilton, Noah Davis has planted something of a joke: a tight, U-shaped mini-exhibition space formed by temporary walls covered in scuffed gray fabric. Three small oil paintings hang within but are impossible to see well. "Stacked Cubicles/My Last Art Fair" offers an uncharacteristic moment of levity from Davis, a knowing poke at the crowded and often claustrophobic conditions of art fairs, a self-deprecating snicker at his allotted sliver of visibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2012 | By Holly Myers
Few artists working in Los Angeles today have been as consistently adamant in their politics as Daniel Joseph Martinez. From his famous contribution to the 1993 Whitney Biennial, “I can't imagine ever wanting to be white” - a work whose edge has yet to dull in 20 years of near-constant citation - to his recent trek along the 800-mile length of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, Martinez's work is scored with outrage and the particular brand of analytical fascination...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2010
Iconoclastic multimedia artist and pro skateboarder Ed Templeton will open a new photo show called "The Seconds Pass," which features all the photographs that he's taken from moving cars over the last 15 years. No Dramamine needed, though. Roberts and Tilton, 5801 Washington Blvd., Culver City. Opening reception 6-9 p.m. Fri.; exhibit 11 a.m.- 6 p.m. Tue.-Sat. Through April 3. Free. robertsand tilton.com.
NEWS
August 25, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
SOMEWHERE between a dorm-room poster of Monet's waterlilies and the Robert Rauschenberg painting owned by Eli Broad is another level -- the beginnings of an art collection that can be built by anyone with a few grand to spend.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2010 | By CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Art Critic
Watching "Avatar," it's hard not to be struck by the utter strangeness of a fantastically complex high-tech movie that worships fervently at nature's mysterious altar. Digital primitivism is a peculiar faith, especially with 3-D glasses. Thirteen mostly recent, mostly large paintings by Mark Grotjahn at Blum & Poe knock that sort of faith upside the head. Emphatically handmade, with layer upon layer of pigment built up with brushes and palette knives on cardboard sheets affixed to canvas, they wear their secrets on their sleeve.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
The fact that Kehinde Wiley maintains studios in three far-flung cities (New York, Beijing and Dakar, Senegal) attests to his success as a painter, which is regularly described as "meteoric. " It also reflects his working method, which involves painting portraits of people from around the world, with some serious help on the background designs from assistants. But most of all, it speaks to his sense of himself as a global citizen, at home in many places — or in none. "I don't have a home base," said the 34-year-old artist at Roberts & Tilton gallery in Culver City, decked out in a tweedy suit of his own design with hot pink piping.
NEWS
June 7, 2007 | Justin Hampton, Special to The Times
THE environment, the war on terrorism, red-blue state feuding -- it's hard to tell which road may lead to Armageddon first. Just to be safe, Ohio-based multimedia artist Jimmy Baker has crafted relics from several imaginary disasters for his one-man exhibit "Rapture," on display at Roberts & Tilton Gallery this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2007 | Chris Lee
Don't get Timothy Olyphant wrong. Sure, the scene-stealing actor is best known for playing a tough-as-nails Old West lawman on HBO's "Deadwood." And granted, he seems to favor big-screen baddies: a deadly techno geek in "Live Free or Die Hard" and a shaven-headed assassin in the current "Hitman." As well, he does a hilariously over-the-top job of dialing in the morning sports report on Indie 103.1 FM five days a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
The fact that Kehinde Wiley maintains studios in three far-flung cities (New York, Beijing and Dakar, Senegal) attests to his success as a painter, which is regularly described as "meteoric. " It also reflects his working method, which involves painting portraits of people from around the world, with some serious help on the background designs from assistants. But most of all, it speaks to his sense of himself as a global citizen, at home in many places — or in none. "I don't have a home base," said the 34-year-old artist at Roberts & Tilton gallery in Culver City, decked out in a tweedy suit of his own design with hot pink piping.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2010 | By CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Art Critic
Watching "Avatar," it's hard not to be struck by the utter strangeness of a fantastically complex high-tech movie that worships fervently at nature's mysterious altar. Digital primitivism is a peculiar faith, especially with 3-D glasses. Thirteen mostly recent, mostly large paintings by Mark Grotjahn at Blum & Poe knock that sort of faith upside the head. Emphatically handmade, with layer upon layer of pigment built up with brushes and palette knives on cardboard sheets affixed to canvas, they wear their secrets on their sleeve.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2010
Iconoclastic multimedia artist and pro skateboarder Ed Templeton will open a new photo show called "The Seconds Pass," which features all the photographs that he's taken from moving cars over the last 15 years. No Dramamine needed, though. Roberts and Tilton, 5801 Washington Blvd., Culver City. Opening reception 6-9 p.m. Fri.; exhibit 11 a.m.- 6 p.m. Tue.-Sat. Through April 3. Free. robertsand tilton.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2009 | Alie Ward
It seems like just yesterday that the blue-chip gallery Blum & Poe moved onto La Cienega Boulevard and the Culver City Art District was born. But the district south of Venice Boulevard, once a string of warehouses and decaying auto shops, has grown up quickly since 2003, and its annual art walk has matured. This Saturday marks the fourth annual Artwalk Culver City, and from noon until 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2000
Museums, galleries and murals mentioned in Christopher Knight's roundup (Page 10) of the top art attractions in Southern California. MURALS Willie Herron's "The Wall That Cracked Open" (4125 City Terrace Drive, near Carmelita Avenue, City Terrace). The 1972 mural is painted at the site where Herron's younger brother was stabbed by local gang members. Judy Baca's "The Great Wall of Los Angeles" (Coldwater Canyon Avenue between Burbank Boulevard and Oxnard Street, Van Nuys).
Los Angeles Times Articles
|