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Roberts

NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
When I saw the first tweet about this, I truly thought it was a hoax. But no, it seems wine critic Robert M. Parker Jr. is launching a lifestyle magazine. Wine-searcher.com has the story and describes the mag as aimed at "high net-worth individuals and corporate leaders. " In other words, Robb Report territory. And what will his new magazine be called? It's not hard to guess: “100 Points by Robert Parker.” Oh, no. Oh, yes. John Stimpfig reports that The Wine Advocate has signed a deal with publishers Hubert Burda Media to publish the new international lifestyle magazine quarterly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Steve Appleford
AUSTIN, Texas - Robert Duvall first came to Texas when he was 10, a San Diego military brat on a visit to his mother's family. It would be his first time on a horse, and his first encounter with the people he would later come to know so well. "These aunts would back up to the fire and lift their skirts to warm their behinds, and I never saw that before," says Duvall, now 83, sitting with a bowl of soup at this city's old Driskill Hotel. "The name of the family was Hart, so we said 'They warmed their hearts.'" He's never lived in the Lone Star State, but he was embraced as a cultural icon here after his acclaimed performance as Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Johanna Neuman
Robert S. Strauss, a one-time chairman of the Democratic National Committee and a Washington insider who combined earthy Texas charm with raw political power, died Wednesday. He was 95. A spokesman for Strauss' Washington law firm, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, confirmed his death but would release no other details. A U.S. trade representative in the Carter administration, Strauss was a poker-playing, cigar-chomping, power-lunch-eating rainmaker who was so successful at recruiting mega-clients that he stopped billing by the hour in the 1970s.
SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | Eric Sondheimer
Los Angeles doesn't have an NFL team, but this year's draft set for May 8-10 is going to generate excitement in Southern California, because a lot of former high school standouts could be selected. Anthony Barr of Los Angeles Loyola, Marqise Lee of Gardena Serra, Troy Niklas of Anaheim Servite and De'Anthony Thomas of Crenshaw will have plenty of fans glued to their TVs and computers hoping to unleash a big scream when they are chosen. Then there's Robert Herron, a receiver from Dorsey who earned a college scholarship to Wyoming in the summer of 2010, just days before the start of fall practice.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Artist Robert Heinecken (1931-2006) is best-known for cleverly manipulating found photographs plucked from mass media, which meant to undermine their authority in America's exploding image-culture. He's not included among the 36 artists in the historical group exhibition "Take It or Leave It" currently at the UCLA Hammer Museum, but he probably should be. A self-styled "para-photographer," Heinecken made pictures that crossed appropriation art with institutional critique, the Hammer show's theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Susan King
Robert Wagner is in a reflective mood. "Movies last forever," noted the veteran actor ("Broken Lance," "The Pink Panther," the "Austin Powers" series),  but the Hollywood he once knew has all but disappeared. "I turned around, and it was all gone," Wagner, 84, said recently in Beverly Hills. Known as R.J. to his friends and colleagues, he's dapper, charming, handsome and very much cut from the same cloth as the suave characters he played in the TV series "It Takes a Thief" and "Hart to Hart," in which he and Stefanie Powers played a wealthy crime-solving couple.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
We know his crimes - boosting his compensation to $1.5 million a year for managing the small working class city of Bell, and allowing the City Council and fellow administrators to similarly fleece taxpayers. We know his likely punishment - he pleaded no contest to 69 felony corruption charges last year and faces 10 to 12 years in prison, plus several million dollars in restitution. Yet, we still don't know why Robert Rizzo chose to rip off the city he was hired to manage. At least, not from his own mouth.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By Eric Pincus
In early February, the Lakers ran out of players in an odd win at Cleveland over the Cavaliers, 119-108. On Thursday, Joe Borgia, the NBA's vice president of referee operations, gave his perspective (via NBA TV ) on the strange final minutes that saw Lakers center Robert Sacre finishing the game despite collecting his sixth personal foul. "We have to have five players on the court at all times," Borgia said. "If there are no available substitutes to come in the game, the player who fouls out has to remain in the game" The Lakers started the game short-handed, with Kobe Bryant, Jordan Hill, Pau Gasol and Jodie Meeks all out with injuries.  Nick Young bruised his knee during the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Daniel Miller and Meg James
It's one of Hollywood's longest-running guessing games: Who will succeed Walt Disney Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Robert Iger? And it just got a little more interesting. Anne Sweeney's announcement this week that she will step down as head of Disney's media networks, including ABC-TV, could help set up important moves on a corporate chess board as Disney prepares for bigger and more dramatic changes. Iger agreed last summer to stay on as CEO through June 2016, 15 months longer than initially planned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Angela Spaccia's upcoming sentencing for her role in the Bell scandal could bring a first in the long-running corruption case - the testimony of Robert Rizzo. The former city administrator, who became a symbol of greed and government corruption, has never spoken publicly about the case. He pleaded no contest to 69 felony corruption charges last year rather than stand trial. But now, the attorney for Rizzo's former assistant said he would subpoena Rizzo in an effort to get him to reveal details of the wrongdoing in the small, working-class city.
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