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Robertson Davies

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NEWS
January 30, 1989 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Robertson Davies is a 75-year-old Canadian writer with flowing white hair, beard and mustache, bright blue eyes and a very pink face. His portly bearing reflects the good food and drink he enjoys. He has kept the upper-class English accent he acquired while at Oxford half a century ago, and his diction and syntax have more in common with that time and place than the contemporary scene.
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NEWS
December 4, 1995 | JANE GROSS and CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Robertson Davies, one of Canada's most celebrated novelists and the master of multiple, eclectic careers in theater, journalism and academia, has died. Davies died Saturday night of a stroke at the age of 82. He had been hospitalized with pneumonia.
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NEWS
December 4, 1995 | JANE GROSS and CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Robertson Davies, one of Canada's most celebrated novelists and the master of multiple, eclectic careers in theater, journalism and academia, has died. Davies died Saturday night of a stroke at the age of 82. He had been hospitalized with pneumonia.
BOOKS
March 26, 1995 | Joanna Scott, (Joanna Scott's most recent book is a collection of stories, "Various Antidotes." Henry Holt will publish her new novel, "The Manikin," in 1996.)
As a young child, I had an interest in false teeth, and my immodest Granny obliged me whenever she came to visit, calling me to her side before a meal so I could watch her put in her dentures and summoning me later for the ritual of removal. Sometimes I would sneak into her room when she was out and take a long, quiet look at the set of teeth submerged in a jelly glass full of mouthwash. Of course, I had no desire to touch the teeth.
BOOKS
February 5, 1989 | Paul Skenazy
"Robertson Davies writes with a wit inherited from the formalities of the English novel tradition, but his heroes are the cultural desperadoes who would defy civilization to inject it with life."
BOOKS
December 1, 1985 | James Kaufmann, Kaufmann teaches writing at Cornell College in Mt. Vernon, Iowa
"I'd been on the job, so to speak, since the boy was conceived on Dec. 10, 1908, at 11:37 p.m. . . . When Francis was conceived--at the very moment of the Major's fortunate orgasm. They summoned me and said this is yours; do well by him but don't show off."
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Robertson Davies has considered a remarkable fact and attempted to turn it into a novel. The fact is one that has to do with possibly most of us living in Canada and the United States. It is remarkable not only in itself but also in that relatively few of us have really remarked on it. We--accountants, factory workers, farmers, lawyers, clerks, postmen, real estate brokers, writers, tycoons--have giants in our lineage, three, four, five, six generations back.
BOOKS
January 29, 1989 | Paul Skenazy, Skenazy teaches literature at UC Santa Cruz. His critical study of James M. Cain will be published this winter. and
Robertson Davies loves to mock the complacency of his native Canada--"the home of Modified Rapture," he calls it. All his work uses satire to encourage sentiment, challenge what passes for decency with the immodesties of passion. He writes with a wit inherited from the formalities of the English novel tradition, but his heroes are Jung, Rabelais, and the cultural desperadoes who would defy civilization to inject it with life.
BOOKS
May 23, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
READING AND WRITING by Robertson Davies (University of Utah Press: $12.95; 64 pp.) Canadian novelist Robertson Davies apologizes a number of times for talking down to his audience during the two 1991 lectures collected in this volume. For good reason: the lectures make for effortless reading, but Davies' views about literature are monotonously familiar: one should read deeply rather than widely, write according to inspiration rather than fashion.
BOOKS
March 26, 1995 | Joanna Scott, (Joanna Scott's most recent book is a collection of stories, "Various Antidotes." Henry Holt will publish her new novel, "The Manikin," in 1996.)
As a young child, I had an interest in false teeth, and my immodest Granny obliged me whenever she came to visit, calling me to her side before a meal so I could watch her put in her dentures and summoning me later for the ritual of removal. Sometimes I would sneak into her room when she was out and take a long, quiet look at the set of teeth submerged in a jelly glass full of mouthwash. Of course, I had no desire to touch the teeth.
BOOKS
May 23, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
READING AND WRITING by Robertson Davies (University of Utah Press: $12.95; 64 pp.) Canadian novelist Robertson Davies apologizes a number of times for talking down to his audience during the two 1991 lectures collected in this volume. For good reason: the lectures make for effortless reading, but Davies' views about literature are monotonously familiar: one should read deeply rather than widely, write according to inspiration rather than fashion.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Robertson Davies has considered a remarkable fact and attempted to turn it into a novel. The fact is one that has to do with possibly most of us living in Canada and the United States. It is remarkable not only in itself but also in that relatively few of us have really remarked on it. We--accountants, factory workers, farmers, lawyers, clerks, postmen, real estate brokers, writers, tycoons--have giants in our lineage, three, four, five, six generations back.
BOOKS
February 5, 1989 | Paul Skenazy
"Robertson Davies writes with a wit inherited from the formalities of the English novel tradition, but his heroes are the cultural desperadoes who would defy civilization to inject it with life."
NEWS
January 30, 1989 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Robertson Davies is a 75-year-old Canadian writer with flowing white hair, beard and mustache, bright blue eyes and a very pink face. His portly bearing reflects the good food and drink he enjoys. He has kept the upper-class English accent he acquired while at Oxford half a century ago, and his diction and syntax have more in common with that time and place than the contemporary scene.
BOOKS
January 29, 1989 | Paul Skenazy, Skenazy teaches literature at UC Santa Cruz. His critical study of James M. Cain will be published this winter. and
Robertson Davies loves to mock the complacency of his native Canada--"the home of Modified Rapture," he calls it. All his work uses satire to encourage sentiment, challenge what passes for decency with the immodesties of passion. He writes with a wit inherited from the formalities of the English novel tradition, but his heroes are Jung, Rabelais, and the cultural desperadoes who would defy civilization to inject it with life.
BOOKS
December 1, 1985 | James Kaufmann, Kaufmann teaches writing at Cornell College in Mt. Vernon, Iowa
"I'd been on the job, so to speak, since the boy was conceived on Dec. 10, 1908, at 11:37 p.m. . . . When Francis was conceived--at the very moment of the Major's fortunate orgasm. They summoned me and said this is yours; do well by him but don't show off."
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