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Robin Cook

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2005 | Vanora McWalters, Special to The Times
Robin Cook, Britain's former foreign secretary and a key member of Tony Blair's Labor government who resigned in 2003 in protest against the Iraq war, has died of a heart attack. He was 59. Cook collapsed while walking in the Scottish Highlands with his wife Saturday morning. He was airlifted to a hospital in the northern Scottish city of Inverness but was pronounced dead an hour later.
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BOOKS
June 24, 2007
The following reviews are scheduled: Martin Rubin reviews "Uncommon Arrangements: Seven Portraits of Married Life in London Literary Circles 1910-1939" by Katie Roiphe. Paula L. Woods reviews "New England White," a novel by Stephen L. Carter. Tim Rutten reviews "Off the Record: The Press, the Government, and the War Over Anonymous Sources" by Norman Pearlstine. Richard Fausset reviews "Redemption Song: The Ballad of Joe Strummer" by Chris Salewicz.
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BOOKS
February 15, 1987 | Jonathan Kellerman, Kellerman is a medical school professor whose most recent novel is "Blood Test" (Athenum/NAL-Signet)
People are afraid of the doctor. Robin Cook, a physician himself, knows this well and has exploited it handsomely in five of his six novels. This, the seventh, is no exception. The story line is standard Cook: medical disaster, shapes of conspiracy, good doctor battles hordes of evil doctors, happy ending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2005 | Vanora McWalters, Special to The Times
Robin Cook, Britain's former foreign secretary and a key member of Tony Blair's Labor government who resigned in 2003 in protest against the Iraq war, has died of a heart attack. He was 59. Cook collapsed while walking in the Scottish Highlands with his wife Saturday morning. He was airlifted to a hospital in the northern Scottish city of Inverness but was pronounced dead an hour later.
NEWS
December 31, 1990 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I never want it said that I don't love "airplane literature." I do! What the world needs, as much as fluorescent lights, or elastic waistbands on skirts, or really excellent french fries, is splendid airplane literature (otherwise known as post-operative literature)--the kind where, when you pick up the book, all turbulence falls away, all fear of pain disappears and death itself seems a pale mirage. Every few months or so, I write these reviews on a plane, as I do this moment.
WORLD
October 6, 2003 | From Associated Press
Former Foreign Secretary Robin Cook said in diary excerpts published Sunday that he believed Prime Minister Tony Blair knew two weeks before the war that Iraq probably didn't possess usable weapons of mass destruction. The claim by Cook -- who resigned from the government over the U.S.-led war -- renewed calls for an investigation into why Britain joined the invasion despite questions about the threat posed by Saddam Hussein.
WORLD
March 18, 2003 | Sebastian Rotella and Janet Stobart, Times Staff Writers
As British Prime Minister Tony Blair prepared Monday to lead his restive and divided nation to war, a top Cabinet minister resigned in protest and another said she also might step down. Robin Cook, leader of the House of Commons and a former foreign secretary under Blair, quit after Britain, the United States and Spain decided to abandon a proposed U.N. resolution authorizing use of force against Iraq.
BOOKS
June 24, 2007
The following reviews are scheduled: Martin Rubin reviews "Uncommon Arrangements: Seven Portraits of Married Life in London Literary Circles 1910-1939" by Katie Roiphe. Paula L. Woods reviews "New England White," a novel by Stephen L. Carter. Tim Rutten reviews "Off the Record: The Press, the Government, and the War Over Anonymous Sources" by Norman Pearlstine. Richard Fausset reviews "Redemption Song: The Ballad of Joe Strummer" by Chris Salewicz.
NEWS
August 4, 1994
Robin William Arthur Cook, 63, British mystery writer who used the pen name Derek Raymond to avoid confusion with best-selling American author Robin Cook. Born in London, Cook dropped out of Eton at the age of 17. He candidly admitted that he had worked as a pornographer, illegal gambling organizer and money launderer, and termed the experience "a very useful thing for a writer."
BOOKS
July 13, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
Medicine in literature doesn't have to be boring. Think of the mesmerizingly detailed operation in Cormac McCarthy's "The Crossing" (rifle bullet in a boy's chest, rural Mexico in the 1930s, no anesthetic). But Robin Cook, who helped launch the medical-thriller genre a quarter-century ago with "Coma," evidently lacks confidence that stem-cell research and therapeutic cloning -- the hot-button issues at the center of his latest novel, "Seizure" -- are enough to keep us turning the pages.
WORLD
October 6, 2003 | From Associated Press
Former Foreign Secretary Robin Cook said in diary excerpts published Sunday that he believed Prime Minister Tony Blair knew two weeks before the war that Iraq probably didn't possess usable weapons of mass destruction. The claim by Cook -- who resigned from the government over the U.S.-led war -- renewed calls for an investigation into why Britain joined the invasion despite questions about the threat posed by Saddam Hussein.
BOOKS
July 13, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
Medicine in literature doesn't have to be boring. Think of the mesmerizingly detailed operation in Cormac McCarthy's "The Crossing" (rifle bullet in a boy's chest, rural Mexico in the 1930s, no anesthetic). But Robin Cook, who helped launch the medical-thriller genre a quarter-century ago with "Coma," evidently lacks confidence that stem-cell research and therapeutic cloning -- the hot-button issues at the center of his latest novel, "Seizure" -- are enough to keep us turning the pages.
WORLD
March 18, 2003 | Sebastian Rotella and Janet Stobart, Times Staff Writers
As British Prime Minister Tony Blair prepared Monday to lead his restive and divided nation to war, a top Cabinet minister resigned in protest and another said she also might step down. Robin Cook, leader of the House of Commons and a former foreign secretary under Blair, quit after Britain, the United States and Spain decided to abandon a proposed U.N. resolution authorizing use of force against Iraq.
NEWS
August 4, 1994
Robin William Arthur Cook, 63, British mystery writer who used the pen name Derek Raymond to avoid confusion with best-selling American author Robin Cook. Born in London, Cook dropped out of Eton at the age of 17. He candidly admitted that he had worked as a pornographer, illegal gambling organizer and money launderer, and termed the experience "a very useful thing for a writer."
NEWS
December 31, 1990 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I never want it said that I don't love "airplane literature." I do! What the world needs, as much as fluorescent lights, or elastic waistbands on skirts, or really excellent french fries, is splendid airplane literature (otherwise known as post-operative literature)--the kind where, when you pick up the book, all turbulence falls away, all fear of pain disappears and death itself seems a pale mirage. Every few months or so, I write these reviews on a plane, as I do this moment.
BOOKS
February 15, 1987 | Jonathan Kellerman, Kellerman is a medical school professor whose most recent novel is "Blood Test" (Athenum/NAL-Signet)
People are afraid of the doctor. Robin Cook, a physician himself, knows this well and has exploited it handsomely in five of his six novels. This, the seventh, is no exception. The story line is standard Cook: medical disaster, shapes of conspiracy, good doctor battles hordes of evil doctors, happy ending.
NEWS
October 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Britain and Germany announced plans to open diplomatic relations with North Korea for the first time since the creation of the Communist state more than 50 years ago. British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook said that more such links could foster good relations between North and South Korea. The U.S. said it expects to follow suit as it sees progress in missile and nuclear arms talks.
NEWS
September 24, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater has been released from the hospital where he was treated for a mild stroke, said Robin Cook of St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix. Goldwater went home Saturday, Cook said, but his family had requested that his release not be made public. Goldwater, 87, the Republican candidate for president in 1964, was admitted about two weeks ago after the stroke was discovered during routine testing. He did not suffer any paralysis.
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