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Robin Cotton

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
After an emergency court hearing Wednesday, O.J. Simpson's defense team reversed field and told a judge that their experts will not participate in DNA testing of blood sample evidence because the conditions being placed on them were too restrictive. "The guidelines are totally unmanageable," Robert L. Shapiro, Simpson's lead lawyer, said as the hastily called hearing came to an end. "We will not be participating." Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lance A.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
After an emergency court hearing Wednesday, O.J. Simpson's defense team reversed field and told a judge that their experts will not participate in DNA testing of blood sample evidence because the conditions being placed on them were too restrictive. "The guidelines are totally unmanageable," Robert L. Shapiro, Simpson's lead lawyer, said as the hastily called hearing came to an end. "We will not be participating." Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lance A.
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NEWS
May 9, 1995
Some of the key events Monday in the O.J. Simpson murder trial: * SUMMARY: Prosecutors opened the portion of their case devoted to DNA evidence with the testimony of Robin Cotton, director of the Cellmark laboratory. Monday's session was shortened by a funeral that Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito and other trial participants left to attend. * WITNESSES: 1. Bernie Douroux, tow-truck driver: Told the jury he picked up Simpson's Ford Bronco on June 13 and took it to police headquarters.
NEWS
May 11, 1995
Some of the key events Wednesday in the O.J. Simpson murder trial: * SUMMARY: A prosecution expert spent the day reviewing DNA test results that the government attorneys say link Simpson to the scene of the June 12 murders. Blood drops from the scene of the crime and from Simpson's house contain identical genetic markers to Simpson and the victims, the witness said, helping establish the prosecution's so-called trail of blood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1995
Forty-two years have passed since two brash young scientists wrought a Copernican revolution in biology. They solved a central mystery of science--how organisms chemically encode the instructions needed to express and perpetuate life. How strange that the O.J. Simpson murder trial would bring the molecular biology of heredity to a prime-time television audience. In 1953, James D.
NEWS
June 24, 1995
UCLA law professor Peter Arenella and Loyola Law School professor Laurie Levenson offer their take on the Simpson trial. Joining them is Southwestern University Law professor Myrna Raeder, who will rotate with other experts as the case progresses. Today's topic: Numbers, numbers and more mind-numbing numbers. On the prosecution PETER ARENELLA "Dry as sand and just as digestible.
NEWS
May 18, 1995
UCLA law professor Peter Arenella and Loyola University law professor Laurie Levenson offer their take on the Simpson trial. Joining them is Los Angeles defense attorney Gerald L. Chaleff, who will rotate with other experts as the case moves forward. Today's topic: More damning DNA. PETER ARENELLA On the prosecution: "So much blood. So much on the Rockingham glove consistent with O.J. Simpson and the two victims that it seeped into the glove's lining. And a bloody smear on the Bronco's console bears the same genetic markers of the two victims and O.J. as the mixed stain on the Rockingham glove.
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