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Robin Gammell

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Depending on your point of view, watching a Pinter play can be disquieting or hilarious--but performing it, says Robin Gammell, is just plain hard. "It's a lovely, witty play--a classic," noted the actor of "The Caretaker," opening Friday at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. "It's wonderful to read it, it's wonderful to rehearse it. But it is also a very vigorous piece. Intricate. It's difficult to learn, difficult to move through, to make connections," said "Largo Desolato's" star.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The Matrix Theatre has a policy of mixing and matching its casts, as it does in its smart new production of Samuel Beckett's "Endgame." In a performance seen Friday night, Robin Gammell played the lord of the manor, Hamm, as a chatty wisecracker. He's less grandiose than the other Hamm--Charles Hallahan--who fills the stage with puffed-up nobility. Consequently, the play's focus shifted a bit, particularly to Allan Arbus' Nagg, Hamm's crotchety, much abused dad.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The Matrix Theatre has a policy of mixing and matching its casts, as it does in its smart new production of Samuel Beckett's "Endgame." In a performance seen Friday night, Robin Gammell played the lord of the manor, Hamm, as a chatty wisecracker. He's less grandiose than the other Hamm--Charles Hallahan--who fills the stage with puffed-up nobility. Consequently, the play's focus shifted a bit, particularly to Allan Arbus' Nagg, Hamm's crotchety, much abused dad.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Depending on your point of view, watching a Pinter play can be disquieting or hilarious--but performing it, says Robin Gammell, is just plain hard. "It's a lovely, witty play--a classic," noted the actor of "The Caretaker," opening Friday at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. "It's wonderful to read it, it's wonderful to rehearse it. But it is also a very vigorous piece. Intricate. It's difficult to learn, difficult to move through, to make connections," said "Largo Desolato's" star.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Daniel Sullivan's powerful staging of "Julius Caesar" at the Old Globe's outdoor amphitheater is set near the end of the 21st century. The world has been "destroyed by religious wars and economic collapse," Sullivan's program note says. "A series of nation states riven by civil war and internecine tribal fighting covers the globe." Prewar Iraq, Chechnya and Bosnia-Herzegovina are models, he writes. These comparisons don't quite ring true.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
People were ready to commit hara-kiri for the chance to see John Malkovich in "Burn This" at the Mark Taper Forum a few weeks back. There probably won't be much trouble getting tickets for Robin Gammell in "Largo Desolato" at Taper, Too (through March 22). Gammell isn't a hot performer and his character isn't a sex object, just a balding professor who wants--oh, so desperately--to be left alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"What's the game?" asks one of the brothers in Harold Pinter's "The Caretaker," suspicious-like. It's a question that many people have asked about the play since it was first performed in 1960. What's going on here? Are the two "brothers" (John Vickery and Jim Piddock at LATC) really brothers, and which is the crazy one? What's their game with the old vagrant (Robin Gammell)--do they plan to knock him off for his identity card?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
We're born "astride of a grave and a difficult birth. Down in the hole, lingeringly, the gravedigger puts on the forceps. We have time to grow old. The air is full of cries." Such is the stoic observation of a homeless man killing time, while time returns the insult. The lines contain a terrible beauty. More often, however, Samuel Beckett's "Waiting for Godot" is a simple play ("Why," Beckett wondered, "do people have to complicate a thing so simple?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC EMERITUS
All you have to do is make your way to the Matrix Theatre on Melrose Avenue to know that producer Joe Stern is back in town. With bells on. Who else would dream of putting on George M. Cohan's hilarious farce, "The Tavern," with two entirely different casts? Who else would guarantee that no two performances are alike by seeing that the mix of cast members changes from show to show? And who else would commandeer a group of players zany enough to submit to such a cockamamie experiment?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1994 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Chekhov poured a lot of anguish about the act of writing into "The Seagull," and in the production of the play now at the Matrix Theatre, some actors best known for their TV work pour a lot of anguish about acting into it too.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
"What I do performing is sort of a live version of what I write," explained South African-born Barry Yourgrau, who arrives at the Saxon-Lee Gallery in "Barry Yourgrau's Safari" on Saturday. "Actually, the performing thing just sort of developed. I'm a writer first; my pieces exist first on paper. I don't write them with an idea of performing them. And I don't write to supply material for my performing. A lot of the things I write I don't perform."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2007 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
A visit to the Vanderhof-Sycamore household of "You Can't Take It With You" is pretty much guaranteed to make a person wish for a permanent place in this bustling, happy family.
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