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March 12, 1991 | JAN HERMAN
You'd have thought she would have an agent by now. She's blond and beautiful and can play everything from Shakespeare to the piccolo. She's starring as Alice in "You Can't Take It With You" at South Coast Repertory. Her name is Robin Goodrin Nordli, and her notices for the pivotal role in SCR's revival of the classic 1936 Hart-Kaufman comedy are no less glowing than the radiant smile she offered the camera one evening last week, during a pre-show interview.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1991 | JAN HERMAN
You'd have thought she would have an agent by now. She's blond and beautiful and can play everything from Shakespeare to the piccolo. She's starring as Alice in "You Can't Take It With You" at South Coast Repertory. Her name is Robin Goodrin Nordli, and her notices for the pivotal role in SCR's revival of the classic 1936 Hart-Kaufman comedy are no less glowing than the radiant smile she offered the camera one evening last week, during a pre-show interview.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The summer's last show in the Garden Grove Amphitheatre is the third in the Grove Shakespeare Festival's ambitious trio of politically difficult Shakespearean plays. First came the beautifully done, prejudicially touchy "The Merchant of Venice" (which unexpectedly turned out to be former artistic director and founder Thomas F. Bradac's eloquent swan song). Then came a driving "Measure for Measure" staged for all its all-around questionable morality by Jules Aaron.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the lovable eccentrics in George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart's "You Can't Take It With You" were based on members of Kaufman's family, wrote Howard Teichmann in his "George S. Kaufman, an Intimate Portrait." On the next page of the same biography, Teichmann noted that Kaufman paid for the emigration of 20 of his distant relatives out of Nazi Germany--with the proviso that none of them should ever contact him.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The oddest modern-dress "Hamlet" I ever saw treated Shakespeare's greatest tragedy as an analogue of the Kennedy myth. Onstage camera crews shadowed the royal family's every move for late-night TV reports, turning Denmark into Camelot. The point of the exercise was not just to exalt the Danish royal family as celebrities in their own time but to remind us that the play's calamitous events were more than a mere family affair.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fallout from the July 1 ouster of Grove Shakespeare Festival founding director Thomas Bradac continued this week with the mailing of an open letter of protest signed by 35 company members. Also, it was reported that Kamella Tate has withdrawn from the lead role of Kate in the upcoming Grove production of "The Taming of the Shrew" over what she called "frustration with the lack of openness and sensitivity in the board's relationship with the company."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1991 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took 25 rewrites and two full productions before Lyle Kessler found the right ending to "Orphans," the play that put him on the theatrical map with hit runs in New York and London and then was made into a movie with Albert Finney. Now Kessler has gone back to the drawing board with his latest play, "Robbers," which opened to good reviews two seasons ago in a world premiere at Seattle Repertory Theatre and before that had a workshop production at the Actors Studio in Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley covers theater for The Times.
The revival of George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart's "You Can't Take It With You," as directed by Warner Shook at South Coast Repertory, is a comedy that you want to take home with you. If only every crazy family could be this much fun, we would all want a piece of the craziness. Alice (Robin Goodrin Nordli), the pivotal character in the plot, has some of the same mixed feelings about her family that Kaufman reportedly had about his own relatives, on whom much of the play is based.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1991 | JAN HERMAN
Director Jules Aaron, whose triumphant staging of "Measure for Measure" has just closed at the Grove Shakespeare Festival, is about to pose a formidable question.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1991 | RANDY LEWIS
"The Taming of the Shrew" can be a tough sell nowadays. Especially if there happen to be any women in the house. After all, this Shakespearean comedy has the goods to set men-women relations back further than an Andrew Dice Clay-led coup at the National Organization for Women. Carl Reggiardo knows that only too well.
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