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Robin Harris

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NEWS
April 17, 1990
The Cook County Medical Examiner's office said Monday that comedian Robin Harris, who was found dead in his Chicago hotel room March 17 after performing at a theater there, died of a heart attack. Autopsy results right after his death were inconclusive. Medical examiner spokesman Bill Juneau said his office had awaited results of toxicological tests before announcing that Harris, 36, who portrayed Sweet Dick Willie in the film "Do the Right Thing," had died of natural causes.
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SPORTS
October 22, 1997 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antoine Harris slips a videotape into a VCR in an assistant football coach's office at USC, hits a button and puts life in rewind. On stage, his father is rolling again, just as he always did: * "Man says to me, 'You got any spare change?' I want to know what the . . . spare change is! Get yourself a spare job, then you'd have some spare change." "I wear my wedding ring on the wrong finger. [Pause] That's because I married the wrong woman." "Look, press-on nails!"
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NEWS
March 19, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robin Harris, the rotund comedian known locally for his pillorying of famous blacks and nationally as Sweet Dick Willie in the movie "Do the Right Thing," has died in Chicago. His manager, Bill Gross, said his friend and client had completed a performance before a sold-out crowd of 2,400 at Chicago's Regal Theater on Saturday night, returned to his room at the Four Seasons Hotel, and was found dead in bed sometime later.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When comedian Robin Harris died of a heart attack two years ago at age 36, he left behind a CD recording of a live performance in which he played himself, stuck with taking some obstreperous youngsters to an amusement park. Harris' "Bebe's Kids" (citywide), based on that tale, has now become the first animated theatrical feature with exclusively African-American characters as principals.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1992 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comedian Robin Harris was on the verge of a major breakthrough when he died of heart failure two years ago at 36 in a Chicago hotel room. The public at large knew him only from a couple of small film roles, principally his oracular Sweet Dick Willie in "Do the Right Thing," but in the Los Angeles African-American community he was a sensation, one of the hottest club secrets in black America.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1989 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
The entertainment industry--particularly the comedy part--is so rife with recycled product and self-cannibalism that a genuinely new talent presents an almost startling freshness and an instant prize. That has to be one of the reasons for the success of Roseanne Barr; it certainly underlies the eager rush to make the most of comedian Robin Harris.
SPORTS
October 22, 1997 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antoine Harris slips a videotape into a VCR in an assistant football coach's office at USC, hits a button and puts life in rewind. On stage, his father is rolling again, just as he always did: * "Man says to me, 'You got any spare change?' I want to know what the . . . spare change is! Get yourself a spare job, then you'd have some spare change." "I wear my wedding ring on the wrong finger. [Pause] That's because I married the wrong woman." "Look, press-on nails!"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When comedian Robin Harris died of a heart attack two years ago at age 36, he left behind a CD recording of a live performance in which he played himself, stuck with taking some obstreperous youngsters to an amusement park. Harris' "Bebe's Kids" (citywide), based on that tale, has now become the first animated theatrical feature with exclusively African-American characters as principals.
NEWS
May 26, 1996 | Kevin Thomas
The late comedian Robin Harris' routine about a guy stuck with taking some obstreperous youngsters to an amusement park has been deftly developed by writer Reginald Hudlin and director Bruce Smith into a pure delight in what is the first 1992 animated theatrical film with exclusively African Americans as principal characters (Cinemax Wednesday at 3 p.m.).
MAGAZINE
April 5, 1998
Styled by Elizabeth Bragin; hair: Daniel Howell/Cloutier; makeup: Bethany Karlyn for Trish McEvoy/Heller Artists; manicurist: Lisa Postma/Celestine L.A.; fashion assistant: George Kotsiopoulos; models: Selena/Elite L.A., Robin Harris/Bordeaux Models, Phina/Company Management L.A., Bianca Barnett/Elite L.A., Kali Harrington/Ford Models L.A.; location: Regal Biltmore Hotel Health Club, Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1992 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comedian Robin Harris was on the verge of a major breakthrough when he died of heart failure two years ago at 36 in a Chicago hotel room. The public at large knew him only from a couple of small film roles, principally his oracular Sweet Dick Willie in "Do the Right Thing," but in the Los Angeles African-American community he was a sensation, one of the hottest club secrets in black America.
NEWS
April 17, 1990
The Cook County Medical Examiner's office said Monday that comedian Robin Harris, who was found dead in his Chicago hotel room March 17 after performing at a theater there, died of a heart attack. Autopsy results right after his death were inconclusive. Medical examiner spokesman Bill Juneau said his office had awaited results of toxicological tests before announcing that Harris, 36, who portrayed Sweet Dick Willie in the film "Do the Right Thing," had died of natural causes.
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robin Harris, the rotund comedian known locally for his pillorying of famous blacks and nationally as Sweet Dick Willie in the movie "Do the Right Thing," has died in Chicago. His manager, Bill Gross, said his friend and client had completed a performance before a sold-out crowd of 2,400 at Chicago's Regal Theater on Saturday night, returned to his room at the Four Seasons Hotel, and was found dead in bed sometime later.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1989 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
The entertainment industry--particularly the comedy part--is so rife with recycled product and self-cannibalism that a genuinely new talent presents an almost startling freshness and an instant prize. That has to be one of the reasons for the success of Roseanne Barr; it certainly underlies the eager rush to make the most of comedian Robin Harris.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Spike's 'Better' Help: Spike Lee's new movie, "Mo' Better Blues," is creating a windfall for a home for the babies of women suffering from AIDS and drug addiction. Actor Ossie Davis announced at Monday night's New York premiere of the movie that Hale House in Harlem will be getting $75,000 from Lee's production company, 40 Acres and a Mule, Universal Pictures and the Nike shoe company.
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