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Robin S Symes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1990 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three of the four defendants in the Lincoln Savings & Loan fraud case have been bailed out of jail, leaving only Charles H. Keating Jr. in custody, Los Angeles County sheriff's officials said Saturday. Judy J. Wischer, 42, Keating's former top aide at Lincoln's parent company, American Continental, was freed on $200,000 bond at 10 p.m. Friday, Sgt. Bob Olmsted said. Robin S. Symes, 37, and Ray C.
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BUSINESS
January 11, 1994 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A bookish computer expert swept up in Charles H. Keating Jr.'s empire to become chairman of Lincoln Savings & Loan was put on probation for three years Monday for his role in helping Keating swindle investors and loot the Irvine thrift. Robin Scott Symes, 41, who also was one of a succession of Lincoln presidents, was given a light sentence in the nation's costliest thrift failure because he helped win both state and federal court convictions of Keating.
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BUSINESS
July 20, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A former president of Lincoln Savings & Loan was charged Friday with two federal securities fraud charges, setting the stage for another plea bargain that would make him a key witness against former thrift owner Charles H. Keating Jr. Robin S. Symes, 38, who at one point was also chairman of Irvine-based Lincoln, is set to be arraigned Monday in U.S. District Court.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1993 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors are recommending lenient sentences for five former executives in Charles H. Keating Jr.'s fraud-ridden real estate and financial empire, saying the one-time associates helped convict the former operator of Lincoln Savings & Loan. The defendants include Robin S. Symes and Raymond C. Fidel, who were chairman and president, respectively, of the Irvine-based thrift before it collapsed in April, 1989. In sentencing memos filed in U.S.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles H. Keating Jr. placed a high priority on selling American Continental Corp. bonds and considered employees who sold them at the company's Lincoln Savings & Loan unit to be "heroes," a former thrift and company executive testified Thursday. Robin S. Symes, who was a Lincoln chairman and chief executive, also said that Keating and a trader at Dexel Burnham Lambert Inc.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through nine days of testimony, the defense attorney for former Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr. has been driving home a major point--none of the small investors who bought bonds at Keating's thrift can link him to any fraudulent sales techniques. But prosecutors in the 20-count criminal securities fraud trial of Keating said that they will bring to the stand today one of their two star witnesses--both former Lincoln executives--to provide that missing link. Robin S.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a firm voice, Charles H. Keating Jr. told a criminal court Friday that he is "absolutely not guilty" of 42 state securities fraud charges stemming from his company's bond sales at Lincoln Savings & Loan branches. Keating, former chairman of American Continental Corp., appeared relaxed and confident as he entered his not guilty plea in Los Angeles Superior Court. If convicted, the Phoenix businessman and three co-defendants could be sentenced to up to 10 years in prison.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former chairman of Lincoln Savings & Loan pleaded guilty Monday to securities fraud charges in both state and federal courts here. Robin S. Symes, 38, of Malvern, Ohio, is the fourth person in federal court and the second in state court to plead guilty to charges stemming from the nation's biggest thrift scandal. Like the others, Symes is expected to testify against his former boss, Charles H. Keating Jr.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles judge Friday refused to reduce the $5-million bail for Charles H. Keating Jr., saying the Phoenix businessman is a flight risk after being indicted on 42 counts of state securities fraud and other violations. Superior Court Judge Gary Klausner said Keating--pursued by creditors, regulators and prosecutors for his role in the failure of Irvine-based Lincoln Savings & Loan--has "significant reasons not to stay around."
BUSINESS
September 20, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles H. Keating Jr. placed a high priority on selling American Continental Corp. bonds and considered employees who sold them at the company's Lincoln Savings & Loan unit to be "heroes," a former associate testified Thursday. Robin S. Symes, who was a Lincoln chairman and chief executive, also said that Keating and a trader at Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. concocted a plan to lie to large institutional investors who might call to ask if the company planned to repurchase their bonds.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission, in its first legal action stemming from the failure of Lincoln Savings & Loan, filed civil fraud charges Tuesday against three former thrift officers involved in the sale of more than $250 million in bonds issued by the S&L's parent company. The three--former Chairman Robin S. Symes, former President Ray C.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles H. Keating Jr. placed a high priority on selling American Continental Corp. bonds and considered employees who sold them at the company's Lincoln Savings & Loan unit to be "heroes," a former associate testified Thursday. Robin S. Symes, who was a Lincoln chairman and chief executive, also said that Keating and a trader at Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. concocted a plan to lie to large institutional investors who might call to ask if the company planned to repurchase their bonds.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles H. Keating Jr. placed a high priority on selling American Continental Corp. bonds and considered employees who sold them at the company's Lincoln Savings & Loan unit to be "heroes," a former thrift and company executive testified Thursday. Robin S. Symes, who was a Lincoln chairman and chief executive, also said that Keating and a trader at Dexel Burnham Lambert Inc.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through nine days of testimony, the defense attorney for former Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr. has been driving home a major point--none of the small investors who bought bonds at Keating's thrift can link him to any fraudulent sales techniques. But prosecutors in the 20-count criminal securities fraud trial of Keating said that they will bring to the stand today one of their two star witnesses--both former Lincoln executives--to provide that missing link. Robin S.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Figure in Lincoln Case Pleads Guilty: The former chairman of Lincoln Savings & Loan pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to two counts of federal securities fraud and, in state court, to six counts of violating state securities laws. Symes, 38, faces a maximum prison term of 10 years in each court. He is scheduled to be sentenced in January. Symes is expected to testify against his former boss, Charles H. Keating Jr.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former chairman of Lincoln Savings & Loan pleaded guilty Monday to securities fraud charges in both state and federal courts here. Robin S. Symes, 38, of Malvern, Ohio, is the fourth person in federal court and the second in state court to plead guilty to charges stemming from the nation's biggest thrift scandal. Like the others, Symes is expected to testify against his former boss, Charles H. Keating Jr.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles district attorney's office Monday filed an amended and expanded 46-count indictment alleging securities fraud against former Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr. and three others. The new charges were submitted to Los Angeles County Superior Court after Judge Lance A. Ito 10 days ago set aside 22 counts of the original 42-count indictment saying they either did not state a criminal offense or were vague. Deputy Dist. Atty.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A former president of Lincoln Savings & Loan was charged Friday with two federal securities fraud charges, setting the stage for another plea bargain that would make him a key witness against former thrift owner Charles H. Keating Jr. Robin S. Symes, 38, who at one point was also chairman of Irvine-based Lincoln, is set to be arraigned Monday in U.S. District Court.
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