Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobin Swicord
IN THE NEWS

Robin Swicord

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2005 | Susan King
Screenwriter Robin Swicord sought to transform herself into an "everyman" when she set out to adapt "Memoirs of a Geisha" for the big screen. She simply had to trust her instincts as she sought to draw out the essence of the bestselling novel by Arthur Golden upon which the movie is based. "I had to go on the simple thought of, 'What I loved [from the book] is what other people loved.' In a way, it is kind of an act of faith," she recounts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences elected 10 first-time governors including Sony Pictures Co-chairman Amy Pascal to its board of directors for the upcoming year. The board's ranks have been expanded from 43 to 48. In addition to Pascal, costume designers Judianna Makovsky and Deborah Nadoolman, designers Rick Carter and Jan Pascale, documentarian Alex Gibney, film editor Lynzee Klingman, and Kathryn Blondell and Bill Corso from the makeup artists and hairstylists branch, will join the board of governors.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences elected 10 first-time governors including Sony Pictures Co-chairman Amy Pascal to its board of directors for the upcoming year. The board's ranks have been expanded from 43 to 48. In addition to Pascal, costume designers Judianna Makovsky and Deborah Nadoolman, designers Rick Carter and Jan Pascale, documentarian Alex Gibney, film editor Lynzee Klingman, and Kathryn Blondell and Bill Corso from the makeup artists and hairstylists branch, will join the board of governors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences announced Wednesday that screenwriter Robin Swicord ("The Curious Case of Benjamin Button") has been elected to the board of governors, representing the writers branch. She fills the seat vacated by Frank Pierson, who died in July. Swicord joins fellow writers branch governors  Bill Condon and Phil Robinson. She will remain on the board until the next election, scheduled for July 2013. Swicord earned an Oscar nomination in the adapted screenplay category for her work on "Benjamin Button.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1994
Regarding your Film Clips item "A Killer Script From San Quentin," by David J. Fox (May 29): Of the 170 screenplays submitted for competition to the Writers Workshop in 1993, only seven were awarded showcase presentations. Of those seven, only two were deemed of sufficient quality to be circulated to the studios. San Quentin inmate Kenneth Gay was one of the two writers. I was the other. My winning screenplay, "Killing Time," is about a murderer but was written by someone with no criminal record and who would find it very difficult to load a rifle to hunt game.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1999
Robin Swicord deserves a standing ovation for her insightful and enlightening article ("Youth Must Be Served--With Respect," May 30). I am so tired of hearing TV and film producers relinquishing responsibility, singing their well-worn song, "We're only giving the public what it wants." Bull! Children don't know what they want--it is our job, as the adults in society, to help them learn. And, no, Mr. Violent Movie Producer, you can't always rely on parents to teach and police their children.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2010 | By KENNETH TURAN, Film Critic
I'm coming out of the closet about Zoe Kazan, breaking a rule I've kept to my entire professional life. It was either that or stand by and watch a very small and quite special film struggle for life and likely wither and die in an unforgiving marketplace. If you don't know her name, Zoe Kazan is a young actress coming into her own. She played Leonardo DiCaprio's character's mistress in "Revolutionary Road" and Meryl Streep's character's daughter in "It's Complicated," was featured in the Royal Shakespeare Company's New York production of Chekhov's "The Seagull" and is costarring on Broadway with Christopher Walken, Anthony Mackie and Sam Rockwell in Martin McDonagh's "A Behanding in Spokane."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2005 | John Horn and Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writers
MOVIEMAKING has been a collaborative business since Day 1, but rarely have so many screenwriters converged on so few screenplays. While some upcoming holiday films may be credited to just one writer, that hardly means just one writer wrote the whole movie. In some cases, producers and studios throw different writers at different sections of a story, adding a joke here, some action there. In other instances, a writer -- or team of writers -- does a top-to-bottom rewrite.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences announced Wednesday that screenwriter Robin Swicord ("The Curious Case of Benjamin Button") has been elected to the board of governors, representing the writers branch. She fills the seat vacated by Frank Pierson, who died in July. Swicord joins fellow writers branch governors  Bill Condon and Phil Robinson. She will remain on the board until the next election, scheduled for July 2013. Swicord earned an Oscar nomination in the adapted screenplay category for her work on "Benjamin Button.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for The Times.
When "Criminal Minds" collide at the Gnu Theatre, watch out. There's Eddie Ray, a failed small-time crook. Nine days before making parole, with the help of his tough-talking, tag-along girlfriend, Billy Marie, Eddie broke out of prison with the mysterious Renfroe. Now on the lam, the threesome have found themselves, in the middle of winter, on a deserted miniature golf course, eating stale vending-machine food and dreaming of a rosy future.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2010 | By KENNETH TURAN, Film Critic
I'm coming out of the closet about Zoe Kazan, breaking a rule I've kept to my entire professional life. It was either that or stand by and watch a very small and quite special film struggle for life and likely wither and die in an unforgiving marketplace. If you don't know her name, Zoe Kazan is a young actress coming into her own. She played Leonardo DiCaprio's character's mistress in "Revolutionary Road" and Meryl Streep's character's daughter in "It's Complicated," was featured in the Royal Shakespeare Company's New York production of Chekhov's "The Seagull" and is costarring on Broadway with Christopher Walken, Anthony Mackie and Sam Rockwell in Martin McDonagh's "A Behanding in Spokane."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
The notion of Jane Austen as palliative for all that ails you reaches its warm and cuddly apotheosis in "The Jane Austen Book Club," adapted from the novel by Karen Joy Fowler. Capably, if not exactly artfully directed by longtime screenwriter, first-time feature director Robin Swicord, "Book Club" is a widget carefully engineered to comfort, console and sell like hot cakes since it was but a gleam in the author's eye, and Swicord doesn't mess with the formula.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2005 | Susan King
Screenwriter Robin Swicord sought to transform herself into an "everyman" when she set out to adapt "Memoirs of a Geisha" for the big screen. She simply had to trust her instincts as she sought to draw out the essence of the bestselling novel by Arthur Golden upon which the movie is based. "I had to go on the simple thought of, 'What I loved [from the book] is what other people loved.' In a way, it is kind of an act of faith," she recounts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2005 | John Horn and Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writers
MOVIEMAKING has been a collaborative business since Day 1, but rarely have so many screenwriters converged on so few screenplays. While some upcoming holiday films may be credited to just one writer, that hardly means just one writer wrote the whole movie. In some cases, producers and studios throw different writers at different sections of a story, adding a joke here, some action there. In other instances, a writer -- or team of writers -- does a top-to-bottom rewrite.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1999
Robin Swicord deserves a standing ovation for her insightful and enlightening article ("Youth Must Be Served--With Respect," May 30). I am so tired of hearing TV and film producers relinquishing responsibility, singing their well-worn song, "We're only giving the public what it wants." Bull! Children don't know what they want--it is our job, as the adults in society, to help them learn. And, no, Mr. Violent Movie Producer, you can't always rely on parents to teach and police their children.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1994
Regarding your Film Clips item "A Killer Script From San Quentin," by David J. Fox (May 29): Of the 170 screenplays submitted for competition to the Writers Workshop in 1993, only seven were awarded showcase presentations. Of those seven, only two were deemed of sufficient quality to be circulated to the studios. San Quentin inmate Kenneth Gay was one of the two writers. I was the other. My winning screenplay, "Killing Time," is about a murderer but was written by someone with no criminal record and who would find it very difficult to load a rifle to hunt game.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
The notion of Jane Austen as palliative for all that ails you reaches its warm and cuddly apotheosis in "The Jane Austen Book Club," adapted from the novel by Karen Joy Fowler. Capably, if not exactly artfully directed by longtime screenwriter, first-time feature director Robin Swicord, "Book Club" is a widget carefully engineered to comfort, console and sell like hot cakes since it was but a gleam in the author's eye, and Swicord doesn't mess with the formula.
NEWS
December 21, 1997 | Kevin Thomas
Gillian Armstrong's beguiling 1994 version of Louisa May Alcott's novel brings alive the past vividly. Armstrong, screenplay adapter and co-producer Robin Swicord and their colleagues have got everything just right. In their vision, Alcott's alter ego-heroine, Jo March (played by a perfectly cast Winona Ryder, right, with Trini Alvarado, center, and Claire Danes), is not a modern-day feminist but points the way to the future in her unladylike ambition and outspoken free thinking.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for The Times.
When "Criminal Minds" collide at the Gnu Theatre, watch out. There's Eddie Ray, a failed small-time crook. Nine days before making parole, with the help of his tough-talking, tag-along girlfriend, Billy Marie, Eddie broke out of prison with the mysterious Renfroe. Now on the lam, the threesome have found themselves, in the middle of winter, on a deserted miniature golf course, eating stale vending-machine food and dreaming of a rosy future.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|