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Robin Trower

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1997 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You've got to give Robin Trower credit for getting off the classic-rock gravy train. At a time when many '70s-era bands routinely reunite to crank out oldie after oldie, the veteran British guitarist has other ideas. At 52, Trower has decent new material (a pleasant surprise) and a summer tour set list with only four tunes more than 3 years old.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1997 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You've got to give Robin Trower credit for getting off the classic-rock gravy train. At a time when many '70s-era bands routinely reunite to crank out oldie after oldie, the veteran British guitarist has other ideas. At 52, Trower has decent new material (a pleasant surprise) and a summer tour set list with only four tunes more than 3 years old.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1987 | RICHARD CROMELIN, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"A&M Classics: Procol Harum." A&M. The British band wears better than you might expect on this 12-track compilation, which contains 55 minutes and 18 seconds of music. The 1967 hit "A Whiter Shade of Pale" retains a timeless power that transcends nostalgia, and some of the songs that in vague memory seem merely pretentious come back strong in the vivid CD sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1997 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robin Trower is a musician whose output never seemed to live up to the potential of his gift. His nimble-fingered guitar work went a long way toward making Procol Harum among the most intriguing British rock groups of the late '60s and early '70s. His second solo album, 1974's "Bridge of Sighs," is a classic of the power-trio genre that still sounds fresh and exciting today. But after "Bridge," Trower began to recycle formulaic, blues-steeped rock ad infinitum.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1987 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
It makes perfect sense that Robin Trower's comeback bid seems to be clicking. After all, this is a time when more and more people's idea of the good old days of rock now includes the '70s . Trower steps into this odd time warp with a new album, "Passion," that's making a steady climb up the charts. And his local shows seem to be a hot ticket.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1997 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robin Trower is a musician whose output never seemed to live up to the potential of his gift. His nimble-fingered guitar work went a long way toward making Procol Harum among the most intriguing British rock groups of the late '60s and early '70s. His second solo album, 1974's "Bridge of Sighs," is a classic of the power-trio genre that still sounds fresh and exciting today. But after "Bridge," Trower began to recycle formulaic, blues-steeped rock ad infinitum.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
In a business where overexposure can be a career killer, '70s guitar hero Robin Trower goes blithely on, playing a circuit of Southland clubs with such frequency that he would scarcely seem more familiar if he was performing door to door. Yet Trower never fails to draw a crowd, and his first of three nights at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano on Tuesday provided some justification for his fans' loyalty.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1993 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dinosaurs! So real! So lifelike! Sorry, if you want to see Stegosaurus, T. Rex and that bunch, you'll have to queue up with everyone else today to see "Jurassic Park." Had you been in attendance at the Coach House on Wednesday, however, you would have gotten to see a well-preserved Trowersaurus rise out of the primordial murk.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Rock riddle: How would a Robin Trower concert sound without songs from his "Bridge of Sighs" album? Answer: Silent. OK, that's an exaggeration, but only a slight one. Performing at the Coach House on Tuesday, he built his set around material from "Bridge of Sighs," which you would expect if "Sighs" was his latest release. But that album is nearly 15 years old.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Power rock of the '70s. Roaring, other-worldly, blues-steeped electric guitars, thundering through stacks of Marshall amplifiers, blissfully bleeding the ears and benumbing the brain. Robin Trower, who performs tonight and Thursday night at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, was one of the genre's most acclaimed practitioners during the era of six raging strings.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1993 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dinosaurs! So real! So lifelike! Sorry, if you want to see Stegosaurus, T. Rex and that bunch, you'll have to queue up with everyone else today to see "Jurassic Park." Had you been in attendance at the Coach House on Wednesday, however, you would have gotten to see a well-preserved Trowersaurus rise out of the primordial murk.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Power rock of the '70s. Roaring, other-worldly, blues-steeped electric guitars, thundering through stacks of Marshall amplifiers, blissfully bleeding the ears and benumbing the brain. Robin Trower, who performs tonight and Thursday night at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, was one of the genre's most acclaimed practitioners during the era of six raging strings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
In a business where overexposure can be a career killer, '70s guitar hero Robin Trower goes blithely on, playing a circuit of Southland clubs with such frequency that he would scarcely seem more familiar if he was performing door to door. Yet Trower never fails to draw a crowd, and his first of three nights at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano on Tuesday provided some justification for his fans' loyalty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Rock riddle: How would a Robin Trower concert sound without songs from his "Bridge of Sighs" album? Answer: Silent. OK, that's an exaggeration, but only a slight one. Performing at the Coach House on Tuesday, he built his set around material from "Bridge of Sighs," which you would expect if "Sighs" was his latest release. But that album is nearly 15 years old.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1987 | RICHARD CROMELIN, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"A&M Classics: Procol Harum." A&M. The British band wears better than you might expect on this 12-track compilation, which contains 55 minutes and 18 seconds of music. The 1967 hit "A Whiter Shade of Pale" retains a timeless power that transcends nostalgia, and some of the songs that in vague memory seem merely pretentious come back strong in the vivid CD sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1987 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
It makes perfect sense that Robin Trower's comeback bid seems to be clicking. After all, this is a time when more and more people's idea of the good old days of rock now includes the '70s . Trower steps into this odd time warp with a new album, "Passion," that's making a steady climb up the charts. And his local shows seem to be a hot ticket.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1991
A sympathetic pat on the back for poor Patrick Goldstein, whose agonizing plea to "stop all these rock graybeards from getting back together" hit home so strongly (Pop Eye, June 2). After all, how can a band like Procol Harum, which gave us dross like the uninspired and soulless "A Whiter Shade of Pale," hold a candle to the invigorating and artistically rich array of newer outfits featured in the same issue of Calendar: Napalm Death, the "loudest" and "most dissonant" band in the world, or Calendar faves N.W.A and those wacky Geto Boys, whose new LPs offer yet more refreshing glimpses of violence and sexism?
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