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Robin Wright

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2009 | By Robert Abele
Perched uncomfortably between flat whimsy and Lifetime movie crescendos, the coming-of-middle-age comic drama "The Private Lives of Pippa Lee" is rough going. Writer-director Rebecca Miller, adapting her own novel about a 50-year-old people-pleasing housewife's long overdue reassessment of her life, is after the elusive charm of a highbrow chick flick. To that end, she's shrewd enough to cast melancholic beauty Robin Wright as the title character, who upon moving into a well-appointed Connecticut retirement community with her retired publisher husband (Alan Arkin)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Mary McNamara
Are you done yet? The second season of "House of Cards" dropped on Netflix on Friday, which was Valentine's Day (and if you are only just learning this, it is officially too late). The diabolical Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey) --calculating adulterer, cold-blooded murderer and (shudder) congressional representative -- is now our vice president, which brings him one step closer to his ultimate goal: world domination (cue evil laughter). His wife, Claire (Robin Wright), is staring down Her last chance to bail on their life of obsessive ambition, and many other things are happening as well (none of which bodes well for the journalists involved.)
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1994 | JAMES GRANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actress Robin Wright lounges casually on a love seat confessing to her addictions. Well, sort of. "Since I've become a mom, I've had to give up coffee," she complains in a raspy whisper, fighting a case of laryngitis this afternoon. Indeed, she admits, unpredictable mood swings have recently been a problem around the Pacific Palisades house she shares with longtime lover, Sean Penn, and it's not because his ex-wife, Madonna, has been calling Penn late at night. "Oh, my gawd!" exclaims Wright.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The second season of the dark and dastardly inner-Beltway drama "House of Cards" dropped at 12:01 a.m. on Valentine's Day. If Netflix knows as much about its subscribers as we think they do, this pretty much proves what we've long suspected: Binge-watching has become the new sex. Actually it makes some narrative sense. Despite its byzantine plots of power and politics, "House of Cards" is, essentially, a love story. One between Americans and their carefully nurtured suspicions about government.
BOOKS
December 15, 1985 | G. H. Jansen, Jansen, author of "Militant Islam," has covered the Middle East for many years.
These two books, as their titles signify, are both about the same subject, Islam in the contemporary world, and specifically that aspect of it that may be called militant Islam. Otherwise the books are not in the same universe of discourse. Emmanuel Sivan's book is a serious, learned study, while Robin Wright has produced a well-intentioned, interesting, even entertaining journalistic potboiler.
BOOKS
February 4, 1990 | Mansour Farhang, Farhang, currently professor of politics at Vermont's Bennington College, served as revolutionary Iran's first ambassador to the United Nations. His latest book, "U.S. Press and Iran: Foreign Policy and the Journalism of Deference" (University of California Press), is co-authored with William A. Dorman
In the contemporary world, the first draft of popular history is composed by journalists. When a distinguished journalist who has covered a landmark story for 10 years writes a book about the event, the result can add depth, scope and perspective to her original dispatches. Robin Wright is such a journalist, and her account of the Iranian revolution surpasses the expectation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
If "House of Cards" were an actual television show, this would be the day after its finale - a time to analyze the cultural impact of the E-ticket D.C. thriller starring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright, and to painstakingly mine the end of the first season for clues to the second. There would be hashtags and recaps, heated discussions and lists of things to love and hate. Instead: radio silence. After all, fans have already seen the finale weeks, possibly months, ago. Or they haven't.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The second season of the dark and dastardly inner-Beltway drama "House of Cards" dropped at 12:01 a.m. on Valentine's Day. If Netflix knows as much about its subscribers as we think they do, this pretty much proves what we've long suspected: Binge-watching has become the new sex. Actually it makes some narrative sense. Despite its byzantine plots of power and politics, "House of Cards" is, essentially, a love story. One between Americans and their carefully nurtured suspicions about government.
BOOKS
December 15, 1991 | Daniel Pipes, Pipes, director of the Foreign Policy Research Institute in Philadelphia, is the author of "Damascus Courts the West" (Washington Institute for Near East Policy) and co-editor of "Friendly Tyrants: An American Dilemma" (St. Martin's).
Robin Wright and Doyle McManus, two Washington-based reporters for this newspaper, announce in the first chapter of "Flashpoints" that we are presently living through a major turning point in world history, one of such fundamental importance that "almost five hundred years have passed since mankind experienced anything comparable." Five hundred years is a long time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Fred Schruers
Some three years ago, when "The Social Network" director David Fincher and executive producer Kevin Spacey took a pizza break across the street from the West Hollywood lot where the picture was shooting, Spacey mentioned a BBC series about political machinations called "House of Cards. " "Do you know this series from Britain?" Spacey recalls asking. "Do you think it would be interesting to maybe adapt it?" Sitting in shorts, sneakers and a pinstriped shirt on the patio of the Beverly Hills Hotel's Polo Lounge recently, awaiting the arrival of Robin Wright, his acting partner in the resultant Netflix series about scheming Washington insiders, Spacey recalls just how long the odds were.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Robin Wright won the Golden Globe for best actress in a TV drama on Sunday night, but that wasn't the only news she made this last weekend: The "House of Cards" actress is engaged to "Lone Survivor" actor Ben Foster. Wright, 47, wore a ring on that finger to Diane von Furstenberg's "Journey of a Dress" exhibition Friday night in Los Angeles, and on Saturday her rep confirmed to People that yes, she was indeed set to wed again.  She and Foster, 33, who met on the set of the 2011 film "Rampart," were outed as a couple in February 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Adore" is a twisted sexual drama about misguided affections between older women and younger men, which wouldn't be all that outrageous if not for the dicey details, so let's get right to it. Naomi Watts and Robin Wright, two of Hollywood's most beautiful and most accomplished women, play mothers who sleep with each other's sons. The sons are of age, with college on the horizon. The boys, not the mothers, are the seducers. It's all very civilized, but still ... They really are still boys.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
Emmy voters mixed it up a bit in the lead actress in a drama category today, recognizing seven nominees including newcomers Kerry Washington ("Scandal"), Vera Farmiga ("Bates Hotel") and Robin Wright ("House of Cards"), a past favorite Connie Britton ("Nashville") and returnees Claire Danes ("Homeland"), Michelle Dockery ("Downton Abbey") and Elisabeth Moss ("Mad Men"). Washington scored her first Emmy nomination for her role as crisis manager extraordinaire Olivia Pope in ABC's soapy political thriller "Scandal.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Fred Schruers
Some three years ago, when "The Social Network" director David Fincher and executive producer Kevin Spacey took a pizza break across the street from the West Hollywood lot where the picture was shooting, Spacey mentioned a BBC series about political machinations called "House of Cards. " "Do you know this series from Britain?" Spacey recalls asking. "Do you think it would be interesting to maybe adapt it?" Sitting in shorts, sneakers and a pinstriped shirt on the patio of the Beverly Hills Hotel's Polo Lounge recently, awaiting the arrival of Robin Wright, his acting partner in the resultant Netflix series about scheming Washington insiders, Spacey recalls just how long the odds were.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
CANNES, France -- Few independent directors have won as many plaudits for their visual inventiveness as Ari Folman. Five years ago, the Israeli first-timer came to Cannes and caught the film world's attention with his combat piece “Waltz With Bashir.” A largely autobiographical account of his experience in the first Israel-Lebanon war, “Bashir” subsumed real-life acting into a palette of painstaking hand-drawn animation. The film went on to be nominated for the foreign-language Oscar and win the Golden Globe in the category.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
If "House of Cards" were an actual television show, this would be the day after its finale - a time to analyze the cultural impact of the E-ticket D.C. thriller starring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright, and to painstakingly mine the end of the first season for clues to the second. There would be hashtags and recaps, heated discussions and lists of things to love and hate. Instead: radio silence. After all, fans have already seen the finale weeks, possibly months, ago. Or they haven't.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2011 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Rock the Casbah Rage and Rebellion Across the Islamic World Robin Wright Simon & Schuster: 320 pp., $26.99 It might seem odd to appropriate the title of a song from an English punk band for a book of in-depth reporting about the evolving political situation in largely Muslim nations, but the Clash's understanding that culture and politics are inextricably intertwined is precisely Robin Wright's point. In "Rock the Casbah," she provides invaluable context for what she rightly terms "the epic convulsion across the Islamic world" by listening to voices we don't usually hear.
MAGAZINE
August 3, 1997
It was a delight to read about those nine extraordinary people--real heroes ("Nine Lives,' by Robin Wright, June 29). In a world filled with so much greed and thirst for power, it is reassuring to know there are people doing good as an end in itself. They are the ones who should get more exposure, as opposed to, say, some of our overpaid athletes, who often have trouble distinguishing between morality and immorality. Rose Martorell Los Angeles The Times and Robin Wright are to be commended for identifying and describing these remarkable individuals--good examples for us all. And in the process of going about it, Wright has spotlighted some serious problems that need our attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Sean Penn's son, Hopper, sure said a mouthful Tuesday to a paparazzo hanging out outside a medical office building where he and his dad were headed. After the elder Penn passed the paps without incident, the 19-year-old muscled his way past and then hurled racial and homophobic slurs at a black photographer, according to TMZ. “I was accosted by paparazzi and made to feel like an animal - threatened and under attack, but that does not condone my own actions," the younger Penn told the website , which posted an unedited version of the video included above.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For those who follow the Gospel According to Netflix, Friday is the day the world changes, instantly and forever. The day when viewers, too long oppressed by commercials, cliffhangers and increasingly erratic scheduling dictated by greedy network overlords, rise up in glorious revolution and seize the means of consumption. As of 12:01 a.m. Friday, all 13 episodes of the highly pedigreed "House of Cards" - Adapted from a British miniseries! Directed, at least initially, by "The Social Network's" David Fincher!
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