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Robin Yount

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SPORTS
September 10, 1992 | From Associated Press
No. 1--April 12, 1974 vs. Baltimore, 4th inning single off Dave McNally. No. 500--July 13, 1977 vs. New York, 3rd inning single off Don Gullett. No. 1,000--Aug. 16, 1980 at Cleveland, 4th inning double off Sandy Wihtol. No. 1,500 -- Aug. 25, 1983 vs. California, 5th inning double off Tommy John. No. 2,000--Sept. 6, 1986 vs. Cleveland, 7th inning single off Don Schulze. No. 2,500--July 2, 1989 at New York, 5th inning single off Jimmy Jones. No. 3,000--Sept. 9, 1992 vs.
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SPORTS
January 20, 2013 | Eric Sondheimer
In the 78-year history of high school sports in the Los Angeles Unified School District, the number of Olympians produced, major league players developed and Hall of Fame members inducted from a variety of sports is staggering. So now you can understand how difficult it is to be selected to the Los Angeles City Section Hall of Fame. The second class of 42 recipients has been selected, and it is a who's who of greatness. There are baseball Hall of Fame members Robin Yount (Taft 1973)
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SPORTS
March 9, 1986 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
He's been a great shortstop, and he'll be a great center fielder. He's such a great athlete that I'm sure if I said "pitch," he could pitch. --GEORGE BAMBERGER, Brewer manager The chronology is found on Page 52 of the Milwaukee Brewers' media guide. The statistics confirm the resolute march of time, the passage from 18-year-old boy wonder to 30-year-old veteran preparing for his 13th major league season.
SPORTS
December 18, 1999 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By his own admission, Robin Yount never has been comfortable talking to crowds. But, boy, could he dazzle them with his play. For 20 prolific seasons with the Milwaukee Brewers, Yount built the credentials that landed him in the baseball Hall of Fame in July, refining his craft year after year like an artisan. At the induction ceremonies in Cooperstown, Yount acknowledged his stage fright during his acceptance speech.
SPORTS
May 8, 1994 | MARK NEWMAN, THE SPORTING NEWS
The Milwaukee Brewers had just finished April with an extra-inning victory at Kansas City and a share of the lead in the American League Central. Their winning pitcher was Jeff Bronkey, an offseason pickup from the Texas Rangers who threw two perfect innings of relief for his first decision with the club. So, Phil Garner, what do you know about Jeff Bronkey? "I don't know anything," the Brewers' manager responds with a laugh. "I just put him out there and let him pitch. He might be interesting.
SPORTS
July 24, 1988 | MIKE HISERMAN, Times Staff Writer
For the better part of a decade, Robin Yount sent scouts, teammates, opponents and sportswriters scrambling to find the right adjectives to describe the way he played baseball, most notably the position of shortstop. They spoke of his youth, athletic ability, competitive spirit and maturity and usually came to the same conclusion: that the blend of qualities Yount possessed would likely land him in the Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
September 9, 1992 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robin Yount was pumping iron in the visitors' clubhouse at Tiger Stadium. This was more than an hour after the Milwaukee Brewers had defeated Detroit last Friday night, 5-3. The clubhouse was almost empty, the bus was about to leave, but even at this late hour there was work to be done.
SPORTS
February 21, 1990
Robin Yount has agreed to $9.6 million, three-year contract with the Milwaukee Brewers. Yount, 34, won his second MVP award last season, batting .318 with 21 homers and 103 RBIs.
SPORTS
July 9, 1991
Doctors have determined that the recent health problems of Milwaukee Brewer center fielder Robin Yount resulted from a passed kidney stone, according to a team spokesman. Yount might be back in the lineup Thursday.
SPORTS
October 24, 1999
Clement Cohen watches the major league baseball playoffs with a critical eye. When a millionaire big leaguer bobbles a pickoff throw or can't hit the cutoff man, Cohen's stomach clenches. "You get a little nutty when the kids do it," Cohen says, "and then you see guys making millions, grown men, and they can't put it together. But the playoffs have been exciting, lots of good baseball. Lots of frustrating baseball too. All in all a couple of exciting series."
SPORTS
August 17, 1999 | FRANK SCHWAB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boyhood idols are, I hope, exempt. As journalists we are told from Day 1 that we must detach ourselves from a story to be objective. But is that really possible if you've been watching that athlete since you were 5? I grew up in Milwaukee, and when baseball caught my eye in 1982, the Brewers were on top of the American League. A shortstop named Robin Yount was suddenly my hero. From that point until 1993, I watched his every move.
SPORTS
July 26, 1999 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came in record numbers to the 60th Hall of Fame inductions Sunday. They carried team banners and wore jerseys with the names of Brett and Ryan and Yount on the back. They filled the Mohawk Valley meadow and inevitably greeted the introduction of Commissioner Bud Selig with the chant of "We want Pete, we want Pete."
SPORTS
July 23, 1999 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the summer of 1956, Phil Yount was living on a farm in Covington, Ind., with his wife and three young sons when an advertisement in the Chicago Tribune caught his attention. Rocketdyne was hiring workers to test rocket engines at its field lab in Los Angeles' San Fernando Valley. The Cold War was heating up, the space race was about to begin and Yount was an engineer working at a plant north of Terre Haute that made heavy water for the hydrogen bomb.
SPORTS
January 6, 1999 | BILL PLASCHKE
The little boy has rubber footballs, roller-blades and a neat Cub Scout cap and kerchief. Yet all he wants to do is play catch. Nobody in his immediate family has played it in 25 years, or has season tickets, or watches it regularly on TV, or talks about it at home. Yet on Christmas the little boy scrambled outside to pitch in church clothes and mud. At which point his bewildered mother asked: "What exactly is it about him and baseball?"
SPORTS
January 6, 1999 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Those who saw Robin Yount blossom as a baseball player at Woodland Hills Sunrise Little League, then at Taft High, never predicted he'd reach the Hall of Fame. But no one is surprised he made it on Tuesday, along with other first-ballot selections Nolan Ryan and George Brett. "It's very deserving," said Clement Cohen, Yount's Little League coach. "He's a very unique individual, not just in baseball but in character. He's been very dedicated, very focused on what he's doing.
SPORTS
June 14, 1998 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
In a quiet Woodland Hills neighborhood, just a baseball throw away from St. Mel's Catholic Church and down the street from Woodland Hills Country Club, a young boy took his first steps toward the Hall of Fame. During long summer days, from sun-up until dusk, Robin Yount would hang out in his backyard with neighborhood buddies imagining themselves as major leaguers. Armed with plastic baseballs and a sawed-off bat, they engaged in heated competition. "They were some of my best days," Yount said.
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