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Robinson Crusoe

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1987
The British have a theatrical custom called panto, a very bawdy olde tyme music hall confection that takes a popular story and spices it up. Theater Exchange's "Robinson Crusoe" is reportedly L.A.'s first professionally staged panto. There may not be another one for some time unless the Brits in the Valley turn out en masse for this one. You've perhaps heard the cautionary line of criticism that "less is more." Never could that advice be better applied than here. Director B.J.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2013
Paul Mantee Actor known for 'Robinson Crusoe on Mars' Paul Mantee, 82, a veteran actor who starred in the 1964 science-fiction adventure film "Robinson Crusoe on Mars" and had a regular role as Detective Al Corassa on the 1980s TV series "Cagney and Lacey" before turning to fiction writing, died Nov. 7 at a rehabilitation center in Canoga Park, according to his wife, Suzy Davis Mantee. The longtime Malibu resident had non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. He was born Paul Marianetti on Jan. 9, 1931, in San Francisco and as a teenager worked as a busboy in his family's Italian restaurant before becoming interested in acting.
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NEWS
January 5, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
"Robinson Crusoe" has been thrown overboard by the planners of the Los Angeles Unified School District's Sixth Annual Academic Pentathlon after a teacher complained about racial stereotyping in the literary classic. In October, the district notified coaches preparing middle-school students for the districtwide academic competition that the Super Quiz would deal with Daniel Defoe's 18th-Century novel about shipwreck and survival.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
I don't read J.M. Coetzee for pleasure. To be fair, I'm not sure anyone does. The 2003 Nobel laureate writes from his head more than his heart, framing novels that are philosophical and austere, books that break down the world in highly rational ways. Over the course of his career, he's been compared to Beckett and Kafka, although despite the occasional nod in their direction - the title character of his 1983 novel "The Life and Times of Michael K. " functions to some extent as an homage to "The Trial's" Josef K. - he lacks their appreciation of humor, of life as essentially absurd.
TRAVEL
July 28, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A common idea lies behind the ritziest Hawaiian coastal resort, the most marginal Mexican beach shack, the script for "Cast Away" and the last island "Survivor" episode: What if this beach were mine alone? The name we usually attach to that daydream is Robinson Crusoe, hero of the 18th century story by Daniel Defoe that some people consider the first English novel.
SPORTS
June 14, 1985 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
I first met the man on the flying trapeze in August 1981. I was covering a roosterfish tournament at this fishing resort on the Sea of Cortez, near the tip of the Baja California peninsula. From a fishing boat a few hundred yards offshore one day, I saw a strange structure on a bluff above a bay. It looked like a McDonald's after a hurricane. "Oh, that's John Bickel's place," someone said. "He's our Robinson Crusoe down here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2013
Paul Mantee Actor known for 'Robinson Crusoe on Mars' Paul Mantee, 82, a veteran actor who starred in the 1964 science-fiction adventure film "Robinson Crusoe on Mars" and had a regular role as Detective Al Corassa on the 1980s TV series "Cagney and Lacey" before turning to fiction writing, died Nov. 7 at a rehabilitation center in Canoga Park, according to his wife, Suzy Davis Mantee. The longtime Malibu resident had non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. He was born Paul Marianetti on Jan. 9, 1931, in San Francisco and as a teenager worked as a busboy in his family's Italian restaurant before becoming interested in acting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2001
SERIES "Backstory" (7 and 11:30 p.m., AMC) recalls "The Boston Strangler," the 1968 film with Tony Curtis as notorious serial killer Albert DeSalvo. "Biography" (8 p.m. and midnight, A&E) recounts the bittersweet career of "Brady Bunch" patriarch Robert Reed. SPECIALS "The Making Of: La Traviata From Paris" (8 p.m., KCET), a behind-the-scenes look at last year's unique production of Verdi's masterwork, precedes a repeat of the opera staged on the streets in the City of Lights.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2007 | Maria Elena Fernandez
The fall TV season is only 1 week old, and NBC already has begun picking up new series for next season. On Monday, the network ordered 13 episodes of "Robinson Crusoe," a drama based on Daniel Defoe's classic novel about an Englishman marooned on a tropical island for 28 years.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | Tony Kornheiser
Last spring, 24-year-old David Goodman of Maryland became the youngest person to win the grand prize of $1 million on "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire." It turns out David is a fan of this column. He's read it for years. Imagine how flattered I was to learn that. A smart kid like him being a fan of mine. Just 24 years old, and with a million dollars in his pocket. And he's a fan of mine! What a country. Quite naturally, I wondered: What's in it for me?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2007 | Maria Elena Fernandez
The fall TV season is only 1 week old, and NBC already has begun picking up new series for next season. On Monday, the network ordered 13 episodes of "Robinson Crusoe," a drama based on Daniel Defoe's classic novel about an Englishman marooned on a tropical island for 28 years.
NEWS
June 15, 2004 | Joe Robinson
The best-known castaways -- Tom Hanks and his volleyball, for example, and Robinson Crusoe -- come from the world of make-believe. One way to tolerate the idea of enduring years without human contact, apparently, is to fictionalize it. Daniel Defoe transformed Scotsman Alexander Selkirk, who spent four years on an island off Chile, into Crusoe -- and gave him a sidekick for company.
BOOKS
November 2, 2003 | John Bayley, John Bayley, a professor emeritus of English literature at Oxford University's St. Catherine's College, is the author of numerous works, including "Leo Tolstoy," "The Red Hat: A Novel" and "Elegy for Iris," about his late wife, Iris Murdoch.
Elizabeth COSTELLO is a quite famous Australian novelist -- her best known work is a feminist reinterpretation of James Joyce's Mrs. Bloom -- now getting on in life and more accustomed to traveling, lecturing and receiving prizes than to writing new novels. She is about to visit America, escorted by her son, to pick up quite a grand award, given by Altona College.
BOOKS
August 11, 2002 | JOAN TAPPER, Joan Tapper is the former editor of Islands magazine.
Alone on a desert island. That's been a favorite subject of fantasies, stories, vacation promotions and cartoons--not to mention a Tom Hanks movie. And we owe it all to Daniel Defoe, whose "The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe" became an instant bestseller when it was published in 1719. But to what or whom did Defoe owe it all? That's the question that Tim Severin sets out to answer in his new book, "In Search of Robinson Crusoe."
TRAVEL
July 28, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A common idea lies behind the ritziest Hawaiian coastal resort, the most marginal Mexican beach shack, the script for "Cast Away" and the last island "Survivor" episode: What if this beach were mine alone? The name we usually attach to that daydream is Robinson Crusoe, hero of the 18th century story by Daniel Defoe that some people consider the first English novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2001
SERIES "Backstory" (7 and 11:30 p.m., AMC) recalls "The Boston Strangler," the 1968 film with Tony Curtis as notorious serial killer Albert DeSalvo. "Biography" (8 p.m. and midnight, A&E) recounts the bittersweet career of "Brady Bunch" patriarch Robert Reed. SPECIALS "The Making Of: La Traviata From Paris" (8 p.m., KCET), a behind-the-scenes look at last year's unique production of Verdi's masterwork, precedes a repeat of the opera staged on the streets in the City of Lights.
BOOKS
March 29, 1987
Richard Eder's excellent review of J. M. Coetzee's "Foe" rightly places its emphasis upon the ambiguous relationship between the artist and the reality which he can or cannot fashion into art, but there is one facet of this subject in Coetzee's novel that has a special meaning for those familiar with Daniel Defoe's fictions. Everyone knows of Robinson Crusoe (Coetzee's Cruso) and Friday, but who is the narrator, Susan Barton?
NEWS
September 9, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
At last: people plopped onto a remote island in a television series likely to appeal evento those fed up to here with Survivormania. No torches. No melodramatic councils. No smarmy host. No Richard Hatch. Best of all, no shadowy conspiracies or visible greed. Instead of a million bucks, the potential payoff for these 28 adults and eight children--who began this adventure on New Year's Eve, 1999--is a million memories. Starting Monday on BBC America--which airs only British imports--is "Castaway," which takes place mostly on the Hebridean island of Taransay, a forbidding slab, 3 miles long and 2 miles wide off the coast of Scotland.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | Tony Kornheiser
Last spring, 24-year-old David Goodman of Maryland became the youngest person to win the grand prize of $1 million on "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire." It turns out David is a fan of this column. He's read it for years. Imagine how flattered I was to learn that. A smart kid like him being a fan of mine. Just 24 years old, and with a million dollars in his pocket. And he's a fan of mine! What a country. Quite naturally, I wondered: What's in it for me?
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